Paul Allen Has Monster Lawsuit Dismissed

Back in August, Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen filed a suit against a fistful of the biggest names in the tech industry, including Apple, eBay, Facebook, Google, Netflix, and Yahoo.

Allen accused the tech giants of infringing upon patents owned by a company he had founded in 1992. Dissolved in the year 2000, Interval Research focused on the Internet and consumer technology applications. Allen's suit accused 11 companies of infringing upon Interval Research-owned patents that covered internet searching and e-commerce.

A month or so after the August filing of Allen's lawsuit, Google and several others listed in the lawsuit asked that it be dismissed on the grounds that it was not detailed enough.

"Interval is not entitled to waste Court and party resources with a scattershot Complaint against multiple Defendants that fails to give any indication as to which products or services Interval contends are infringing and the factual basis for such a claim," Google is quoted as saying in its request.

Last Friday judge Marsha Pechman concurred and dismissed Allen's complaint. Undeterred, a spokesperson for the Microsoft co-founder described the dismissal as a "procedural issue" and told the Wall Street Journal, "The case is staying on track."

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  • Wow, so Allen's argument was: "We own patents and these companies with big bank accounts are somehow infringing upon those patents, which I refuse to name?" The guy is worth like $20-billion, what more does he want?
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  • hellwigWow, so Allen's argument was: "We own patents and these companies with big bank accounts are somehow infringing upon those patents, which I refuse to name?" The guy is worth like $20-billion, what more does he want?


    and people wonder why the court system is all fouled up.
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  • No, the court system actually worked this time - in throwing this out.

    It's the PATENT office that's the problem in giving patents to "idea's", instead of something that's actually REAL.

    Ya know - back in the 60's some Sci-Fi writers wrote about these cool helmets that have a built in heads up display with built in radar, radios, and all that fancy stuff - should their estates sue Halo makers, Ironman movie creators, and all the other modern games and movies that have used that same IDEA? You patent an actual ITEM - not an idea. /offsoapbox
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