Seagate Shipping Pulsar XT.2 Solid State Drive

Monday Seagate said that it shipped its fastest SSD thus far, the enterprise-class Pulsar XT.2, which combines single-level cell (SLC) flash with a native SCSI 6 Gb/s (SAS) interface. The company's other Pulsar enterprise-geared SSD, the Pulsar.2, will feature multi-level cell NAND flash when it hits retail shelves next week on July 29.

According to Seagate, the 2.5-inch Pulsar XT.2 is geared for complex, mixed workloads typical of enterprise environments such as online transaction processing (OLTP), database or web indexing, and email. However the upcoming 2.5-inch Pulsar.2 SSD, which supports both native 6 Gb/s SAS and Serial ATA (SATA) 6 Gb/s interfaces, was designed specifically for data centers. It automatically detects and corrects any number of data errors that could otherwise plague normal drive operations, delivering "the price/performance, data integrity, and endurance needed for performance-hungry enterprise applications," the company said.

"Most SSD suppliers aren’t fully aware of the needs of the enterprise," said Jim Handy of Objective Analysis. "It isn’t just a fast interface like SAS, Fibre Channel, or PCIe that they need, and it isn’t just IOPS levels in the tens to hundreds of thousands. Without data integrity and reliability, an SSD is worthless to most enterprise users. Seagate’s undeniable leadership in the enterprise HDD market has given the company a deep understanding of the necessity of data integrity and endurance."

The Pulsar XT.2 now arrives in 100 GB, 200 GB and 400 GB capacities. It's hotpluggable, offers a Self-Encrypting Drive (SED) tech for the 400 GB model, a sustained data transfer rate of 360 MB/s and an I/O data transfer rate of 600 MB/s. Next week the Pulsar.2 will come in 100 GB, 200 GB, 400 GB and 800 GB capacities and will offer SED tech only on the 800 GB model.

"The Pulsar.2 drive is the first MLC-enabled SSD from an enterprise storage company to deliver the price-performance benefits with the data integrity and drive endurance needed for demanding enterprise environments," the company said.

Seagate did not provide pricing for the Pulsar XT.2 and the Pulsar.2, so stay tuned.

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  • Randomacts
    Why can't they just compete for better $/g ratio...

    imo most people don't need this speed anyways.
    -1
  • danwat1234
    I heard from storagereview that the Pulsar MLC drive can handle 15 Petabytes of writing over it's lifetime and the SLC drive can handle 25 Petabytes! Sounds too good to be true.
    1
  • Kaiser_25
    price is going to be lulz
    1