QNAP Offers World's Smallest NAS

QNAP Systems today is claiming to offer the "world's smallest 8-bay" with its new SS-839 Pro Turbo network-attached storage (NAS) server. The company backs its claim by providing support for eight 2.5-inch hard drives or solid state disks (SSD), and a storage capacity of up to 4 TB (or up to 500 GB per drive). To expand the NAS even more, QNAP also included two eSATA and five USB ports, allowing end-users to add extra external backup storage if needed. According to QNAP, the SS-839 Pro Turbo is targeted for business owners, consuming low power (34 W with all 8 bays installed) and remaining extremely quiet while providing high performance, stability, and scalability.

Under the hood, the SS-839 Pro features Intel's Atom N270 CPU running at 1.6 GHz, 2 GB DDR2 RAM, 128 MB Disk on Module (DOM) flash memory, and 2 gigabit RJ-45 Ethernet ports. The server also supports RAID 0, 1, 5, 6, 5 + hot spare, single, and JBOD, Online RAID Capacity Expansion, and Online RAID Level Migration. On the security front, the server uses AES 256-bit volume-based encryption: end-users must provide the encryption password in order to access the drives.

Outside the hardware specifications, the SS-439 Pro Turbo can not only act as a network server, but also as an FTP sever and a web server using built-in applications such as phpMyAdmin, Joomla, MySQL/ SQLite, and an editable php.ini. As a printer server, the NAS supports up to three printers; performing as a Surveillance Station, the NAS can support up to four IP-based cameras. QNAP said that end-users could add additional software applications such as a mail server provided by XDove, a Wordpress system or other environments. Additional features include Wake on LAN, automatic policy-based IP blocking, network share status report, instant SMS and email alert, and more.

According to QNAP, the SS-839 Pro Turbo is compatible with Windows, Mac, Linux, and UNIX operating systems. But is this really the "world's smallest 8-bay" NAS? Based on the specs, the overall size of the server is 6.97 (H) x 7.09 (W) x 9.25 (D) inches.

Currently, QNAP has not provided pricing and availability at this time.

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  • jeffunit
    The intel atom doesn't have ecc. Not so smart for a NAS to lack ecc, as all data flows through memory.

    If the AES encryption isn't done with dedicated hardware, but done with the atom, it is sure to slow everything down.

    Sure looks cute though...
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  • 08nwsula
    jeffunitThe intel atom doesn't have ecc. Not so smart for a NAS to lack ecc, as all data flows through memory.If the AES encryption isn't done with dedicated hardware, but done with the atom, it is sure to slow everything down.Sure looks cute though...


    you almost always take a performance hit when size becomes more important. You would have to be really pressed for floor space to take advantage of this thing. Super small business anyone?
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  • WheelsOfConfusion
    08nwsulayou almost always take a performance hit when size becomes more important. You would have to be really pressed for floor space to take advantage of this thing. Super small business anyone?

    Then again, VIA's Nano features hardware for full AES encryption and generally better performance than the single-core version of the Atom, using only slighting more power and a little bit more heat. It also has ECC.
    2