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Intel Pushing 550 MB/s mSATA Speeds with SSD 525 Series

By - Source: Intel | B 14 comments

Intel has introduced a new mSATA SSD with SATA 3 bandwidth performance.

Intel on Monday introduced the SSD 525 Series, a small mSATA form factor SSD packed with Intel's 25-nm MLC NAND Flash and SATA 3 (6 Gb/s) bandwidth performance. Using merely one-eighth the space of traditional 2.5-inch hard drives, this new solution is ideal for Ultrabook, tablet and embedded applications.

"Intel SSDs reduce the risk of data loss due to shock, vibration or jarring," said James Slattery, product line manager for Intel Non-Volatile Memory Solutions Group Client SSDs. "With these new performance thresholds available in a small form factor package, and backed by Intel quality and reliability, the Intel SSD 525 opens the door to an unlimited number of creative embedded solutions such as in-flight entertainment, mobile workstations, microservers and IP phone storage."

This is the latest offering in the Intel 500 Series SSD family, aimed at higher-performance, enthusiast solutions. It connects via a PCI Express (PCIe) mini-connector, measures just 3.7 x 50.8 x 29.85-mm and weighs 10 grams. Initial capacities will include 120 GB and 180 GB, but Intel plans to release 30 GB, 60 GB, 90 GB, and 240 GB models later in 1Q13.

According to Intel, the new mSATA SSD features a random read performance of up to 50,000 IOPS and sequential read performance up to 550 MB/s. The random write performance is up to 80,000 IOPS and sequential write is up to 520 MB/s (depends on the capacity). Also thrown into the mix is Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) 128-bit encryption capabilities for added data protection, and a 5-year limited warranty.

On Monday Intel also released the Intel SSD Toolbox with Intel SSD Optimizer, a free utility that provides Windows customers (including Windows 8) with a powerful set of management, information and diagnostic tools. There's also the free Intel Data Migration Software toolset to help clone the entire content of a previous storage drive (SSD or HDD) to any Intel SSD.

For more information about the Intel SSD 525 Series, head here.

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  • 15 Hide
    CaedenV , January 29, 2013 1:16 AM
    A Bad DayDesktops: Lol seriously?

    Absolutely in desktops!
    I am working on a build now in a mATX form factor which is meant to be a portable high end video editing rig. The problem with so much power in such a small space is always heat disipation, and HDDs are big rectangular bricks that block airflow, and in an editing rig you need a minimum of 3 of them. So what I did was a mSATA for the OS drive, and then I have 2 normal SSDs in RAID1 for the content drive. All paired with an i5 or i7 CPU, 16GB of ram, and crammed in a nice little box that is ~6" wide, ~6" tall, and ~9" deep.
    It may not be useful for most desktop systems, but in a box that size having an mSATA tucked away under the mobo for the OS makes all the difference in the world!
Other Comments
  • 2 Hide
    A Bad Day , January 28, 2013 11:40 PM
    Usage of mSATA:

    Tablets: Many use proprietary mini SSDs.

    Laptops: Most lack mSATA support except for some of the higher end gaming/business laptops.

    Desktops: Lol seriously?


    If there's ever going to be a major market for mSATA drives, there has to be a major push on laptop/tablet manufacturers to include mSATA support.
  • 5 Hide
    halcyon , January 29, 2013 12:37 AM
    I think my Dell XPS 15 (L521x) would be interested in the 240GB model. She's pretty spoiled.
  • 15 Hide
    CaedenV , January 29, 2013 1:16 AM
    A Bad DayDesktops: Lol seriously?

    Absolutely in desktops!
    I am working on a build now in a mATX form factor which is meant to be a portable high end video editing rig. The problem with so much power in such a small space is always heat disipation, and HDDs are big rectangular bricks that block airflow, and in an editing rig you need a minimum of 3 of them. So what I did was a mSATA for the OS drive, and then I have 2 normal SSDs in RAID1 for the content drive. All paired with an i5 or i7 CPU, 16GB of ram, and crammed in a nice little box that is ~6" wide, ~6" tall, and ~9" deep.
    It may not be useful for most desktop systems, but in a box that size having an mSATA tucked away under the mobo for the OS makes all the difference in the world!
  • 3 Hide
    GabZDK , January 29, 2013 1:18 AM
    CaedenVAbsolutely in desktops!I am working on a build now in a mATX form factor which is meant to be a portable high end video editing rig. The problem with so much power in such a small space is always heat disipation, and HDDs are big rectangular bricks that block airflow, and in an editing rig you need a minimum of 3 of them. So what I did was a mSATA for the OS drive, and then I have 2 normal SSDs in RAID1 for the content drive. All paired with an i5 or i7 CPU, 16GB of ram, and crammed in a nice little box that is ~6" wide, ~6" tall, and ~9" deep.It may not be useful for most desktop systems, but in a box that size having an mSATA tucked away under the mobo for the OS makes all the difference in the world!


    That's why i have always been grateful that Gigabyte boards have onboard mSATA, iTX gaming mobile machine, yes please!!
  • -4 Hide
    A Bad Day , January 29, 2013 1:19 AM
    CaedenVAbsolutely in desktops!I am working on a build now in a mATX form factor which is meant to be a portable high end video editing rig. The problem with so much power in such a small space is always heat disipation, and HDDs are big rectangular bricks that block airflow, and in an editing rig you need a minimum of 3 of them. So what I did was a mSATA for the OS drive, and then I have 2 normal SSDs in RAID1 for the content drive. All paired with an i5 or i7 CPU, 16GB of ram, and crammed in a nice little box that is ~6" wide, ~6" tall, and ~9" deep.It may not be useful for most desktop systems, but in a box that size having an mSATA tucked away under the mobo for the OS makes all the difference in the world!


    I suppose there are always exceptions...
  • 1 Hide
    hero1 , January 29, 2013 1:51 AM
    A Bad DayUsage of mSATA:Tablets: Many use proprietary mini SSDs.Laptops: Most lack mSATA support except for some of the higher end gaming/business laptops.Desktops: Lol seriously?If there's ever going to be a major market for mSATA drives, there has to be a major push on laptop/tablet manufacturers to include mSATA support.


    I'm currently looking for an mSATA that I can use for OS and work files. This means I can have a 512GB SSD or the ones I have now in raid just for games. The more airflow I have in my rig, the better. If price is right then I'm going for this one but I want to see what Sammy have up their sleeves.
  • 0 Hide
    madjimms , January 29, 2013 2:02 AM
    I like mSATA simply because its smaller & thus allows more airflow in the case. In addition to the smaller device size, the actual power/data plugs are exactly the same.
  • 0 Hide
    madjimms , January 29, 2013 2:03 AM
    MadjimmsI like mSATA simply because its smaller & thus allows more airflow in the case. In addition to the smaller device size, the actual power/data plugs are exactly the same.

    Sorry, mistake on the plugs being the same...
  • 2 Hide
    danwat1234 , January 29, 2013 2:43 AM
    "On Monday Intel also released the Intel SSD Toolbox with Intel SSD Optimizer," , you mean a new version. The Intel SSD Toolbox has been around for a while. The new version supports windows 8.

    I like this SSD. Hopefully my next laptop will have an mSATA port so I can have a 512GB mSATA SSD and then a mechanical (hybrid) drive for storage, maybe 2 hybrid drives.
    And by the time I get a new laptop, mSATA SSDs will probably be faster than the 840 Pro or the Vector so you won't have to sacrifice anything for the small form factor, except for price and max capacity.
  • -2 Hide
    emad_ramlawi , January 29, 2013 10:26 AM
    A-Data already done that for many months

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820211664
    http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/storage/43305-adata-xpg-sx300-128gb-msata-ssd/

    But you in Intel loving bastards at Tom`s hardware love to kiss ass of the ones whom pays you.
  • 0 Hide
    K2N hater , January 29, 2013 11:19 AM
    I've had the SSD toolbox with optimizer for like 1 year and a half...
  • 0 Hide
    ojas , January 29, 2013 12:46 PM
    This is simply the mSATA version of the 520.

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6702/intels-ssd-525-bringing-isandforce-to-msata

    Quote:
    Today Intel is officially announcing what we've had in house since the end of last year: the Intel SSD 525. Based on SandForce's SF-2281 controller but using a special Intel validated (but SandForce developed) firmware, the 525 is an mSATA version of the 2.5" SATA Intel SSD 520 that launched last February. Unlike the Intel SSD 335, the 525 uses the same 25nm 2-bit MLC IMFT NAND as the 520, the only difference here is the form factor.
  • 0 Hide
    game junky , January 29, 2013 2:38 PM
    Now that they're making more laptops w/ mSATA slots, you're going to see some quick access speeds in newer ultrabooks with these bad boys in them. OS being deployed from factory with these caching files for a large HDD should make for an excellent user experience.

    Cost-wise, it's better to have this drive caching for a 750GB 7.2k SATA drive than upgrading to a 256/512GB SSD.
  • 0 Hide
    halcyon , January 29, 2013 5:27 PM
    ^ My aforementioned Dell came with a 128GB caching Samsung 830 to feed a 1 TB WD Blue. It never got the chance though as I turned caching off and replaced the WD with a 500GB Samsung 840. I may eventually try the caching thang.