Samsung Wins UK Tablet Victory Because "It's Not Cool"

Despite several setbacks here in the States that led to at least one product ban, Samsung saw a small victory in its patents war with Apple on Monday.

Over in the UK, British High Court Judge Colin Birss ruled that Samsung's Galaxy Tab Android-powered tablets definitely belonged in the same family as Apple's iPad when viewed from the front. But when the Galaxy Tabs are compared to Apple's gadget from the side, it's "very thin, almost insubstantial members of that family with unusual details on the back."

In fact, the judge indicated that Samsung's tablets just aren't as "cool," and therefore no infringement is taking place. Was that comment insulting to Samsung? Probably. Will the company take what it can get at this point? Most definitely.

"They do not have the same understated and extreme simplicity which is possessed by the Apple design. They are not as cool," Judge Birss said. "The overall impression produced is different."

Naturally Apple wasn't pleased with the verdict, as it still insists that Samsung is violating several of its patents. The company wouldn't offer a statement regarding Monday's ruling either, but provided its stance on Samsung instead.

"It's no coincidence that Samsung's latest products look a lot like the iPhone and iPad, from the shape of the hardware to the user interface and even the packaging," the company said. "This kind of blatant copying is wrong and, as we've said many times before, we need to protect Apple's intellectual properties when companies steal our ideas."

The two companies have been disputing over Android-related patents for many years across ten countries. Currently Samsung is banned from selling the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 here in the States, but on Friday the company was given the green light to continue the sales of its new Galaxy Nexus smartphone for the immediate future.

"Should Apple continue to make excessive legal claims in other countries based on such generic designs, innovation in the industry could be harmed and consumer choice unduly limited," Samsung said in a statement.

Create a new thread in the US News comments forum about this subject
This thread is closed for comments
42 comments
    Your comment
    Top Comments
  • lilotimz
    No actual quotes from the judge's statements?
    /dissapoint
    Quote:
    In a ruling on July 9, 2012, the High Court of England & Wales sided with Samsung that the designs of the Galaxy Tab series of products are 'different' from an Apple tablet design, and do not infringe Apple’s Registered Community Design No. 181607-0001. Samsung products subject to this trial were the Galaxy Tab 10.1, the Galaxy Tab 8.9, and the Galaxy Tab 7.7."Samsung had requested this voluntary trial in September 2011, in order to oppose Apple’s ongoing efforts to reduce consumer choice and innovation in the tablet market through their excessive legal claims and arguments. Apple has insisted that the three Samsung tablet products infringe several features of Apple’s design right, such as 'slightly rounded corners,' 'a flat transparent surface without any ornamentation,' and 'a thin profile.'"However, the High Court dismissed Apple’s arguments by referring to approximately 50 examples of prior art, or designs that were previously created or patented, from before 2004. These include the Knight Ridder (1994), the Ozolin (2004), and HP’s TC1000 (2003). The court found numerous Apple design features to lack originality, and numerous identical design features to have been visible in a wide range of earlier tablet designs from before 2004."Equally important, the court also found distinct differences between the Samsung and Apple tablet designs, which the court claimed were apparent to the naked eye. For instance, the court cited noticeable differences in the front surface design and in the thinness of the side profile. The court found the most vivid differences in the rear surface design, a part of tablets that allows designers a high degree of freedom for creativity, as there are no display panels, buttons, or any technical functions. Samsung was recognised by the court for having leveraged such conditions of the rear surface to clearly differentiate its tablet products through 'visible detailing.'
    19
  • ddpruitt
    Apple, "It's fine if we outright steal someone else's stuff and call it our own (Mac, Ipod, etc) but if you make something with a screen and a case we'll sue you for infringement"
    16
  • jamoise
    nuvonReally? Samsung didn't get any of its ideas from Apple?


    Really? Apple didn't get any of its ideas from Microsofts Tablet in 2002?
    15
  • Other Comments
  • blazorthon
    Apple's advantage always has included being considered more cool. Regardless, congradulations on the victory, Samsung, regardless of how small it is. I don't think that Samsung's stuff is really as similar to Apple's as some have said and this seems to support that view.
    7
  • blazorthon
    Quote:
    Quote:
    "It's no coincidence that Samsung's latest products look a lot like the iPhone and iPad, from the shape of the hardware to the user interface and even the packaging," the company said. "This kind of blatant copying is wrong and, as we've said many times before, we need to protect Apple's intellectual properties when companies steal our ideas."


    Apple does not own the rights to Tablets, They've been here before the iPad.

    Apple does not own the rights to Ultrabooks as well...........hopefully they dont start suing people after granted their newest "patent " on it


    Having read into the new patent a little, it was actually a more specific than it is often given credit for.
    0
  • ddpruitt
    Apple, "It's fine if we outright steal someone else's stuff and call it our own (Mac, Ipod, etc) but if you make something with a screen and a case we'll sue you for infringement"
    16