Samsung Galaxy S4 Benchmark Confirms Eight Cores

Samsung's unannounced Galaxy S4 smartphone has made its first appearance in a benchmark listing, which seemingly confirms the device being powered by eight cores.

Outed by Antutu Benchmarks, a Korean variant (SHV-E300S) and an international variant (GT-I9500) are listed. According to the benchmark, the Galaxy S4 boasts Samsung's Exynos 5 Octa processor -- the world's first eight-core mobile processor -- clocked at 1.8GHz. It'll apparently launch with Android 4.2.1 Jelly Bean.

Other rumored features of the Galaxy S4 include an eight-core Mali-T658 GPU, 4.99-inch SuperAMOLED full HD display, at least 2 GB of RAM, a rear 13-megapixel camera and a front-facing 2-megapixel front facing snapper.

Although it failed to make an appearance at CES 2013, Samsung has confirmed the existence of the Galaxy S4 and said it won't launch until May at the earliest.

The device has previously been rumored to feature Samsung's eight-core processor, as well as sporting its flexible OLED display. As for the screen itself, if a Samsung CES 2013 roadmap is anything to go by, it's seemingly 4.99-inches and offers a full HD 1080p resolution.

 

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  • I would like to see flagship phones with smaller screens.
    21
  • Quote:
    front-facing 2-megapixel front facing snapper


    If you guys need an editor I'll gladly take the job.
    20
  • Actually, the SOC contains one 4-core A15 cpu and another 4-core A7 cpu whereas the A15 core is used for performance and the A7 for power savings. It is not one whole 8-core CPU.
    15
  • Other Comments
  • nice to hear but honestly the market is pretty full of android phones. would like to see some ubuntu phone products
    -20
  • I would like to see flagship phones with smaller screens.
    21
  • ....and has an amazing 23 minutes of battery time. Seriously, do consumers really need that many cores?
    -13