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Seagate Rolls Out 4 TB HDD for Video Storage

By - Source: TechPowerUp | B 28 comments

Seagate has introduced some new hard drives specifically built for video storage and consumption.

Seagate has announced its new video 3.5-inch lineup of HDDs available in capacities up to 4 TB. These drives are intended to be used in DVRs and set-top boxes, as well as surveillance systems and media centers. According to Seagate, the drives have been specifically engineered for three critical areas: capacity, reliability and acoustics. Seagate boasts an annual failure rate of just 0.55 percent.

"Leveraging Seagate's 10 years of experience understanding the requirements of the video market, we've combined our knowledge on heat, acoustics and power to deliver what we believe to be the most reliable DVR drive in the world," said Scott Horn, VP of marketing at Seagate. "Our commitment to deliver a drive with unrivaled reliability ensures the safekeeping of consumers' content as well as keeping DVRs, STBs, and surveillance systems in the field longer."

The drives will come in capacities ranging from 250 GB all the way up to 4 TB, and all these drives spin at 5900 RPM. Drives up to 2 TB in size have a SATA2 interface, while the 3 TB and 4 TB models have a newer SATA3 interface. So far there has been no word on pricing nor availability.

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Top Comments
  • 13 Hide
    purrcatian , May 29, 2013 2:25 AM
    Back up your reliability claims with a warranty to match.
Other Comments
  • 13 Hide
    purrcatian , May 29, 2013 2:25 AM
    Back up your reliability claims with a warranty to match.
  • -2 Hide
    cats_Paw , May 29, 2013 2:59 AM
    After i burned 4 Seagate HDDS in under 6 months (heavy use and a few power surges in summer), i switched to Samsung drives. 3 years working now, never had a problem with samsung drives.
    Sorry seagate, but your product quality is simply not good enought.
  • Display all 28 comments.
  • -2 Hide
    Rune Olsen , May 29, 2013 3:14 AM
    Never getting Seagate drives again. Every single one i've had failed
  • 5 Hide
    Anonymous , May 29, 2013 3:16 AM
    My 2TB Barracuda is running solid, ignore these trolls, had it for over a year now under heavy use
  • 5 Hide
    squirrelboy , May 29, 2013 3:18 AM
    they are the 0.55%, of course you wont get as many comments from people with working products
  • -3 Hide
    Spooderman , May 29, 2013 3:52 AM
    My 5+ year barracuda 128 GB is still going, but I still wouldn't buy any more of their products.
  • 4 Hide
    Spanky Deluxe , May 29, 2013 3:54 AM
    Whatever happened to those 5TB hard drives you said were going to be coming at the beginning of 2012, Seagate?
  • 5 Hide
    laststop311 , May 29, 2013 3:54 AM
    *yawn* seems like we have been stuck at 4TB capacity a long time where are the 1TB per platter 5 platter 5TB drives at?
  • 1 Hide
    laststop311 , May 29, 2013 3:55 AM
    wow almost same comment at the same time submitted thats freaky
  • -4 Hide
    drwho1 , May 29, 2013 4:41 AM
    I LOL at this: "Seagate has introduced some new hard drives specifically built for video storage and consumption"
    ... so we can eat it too? LOL
    in a more serious note I already use 4TB drives for Video (specifically TV shows).
    so... what really makes this drives "better" after all I just store my shows (I don't delete then) on and off all the time, so they should last for a very long time (I think) since there is no constant rewrites to the disk.
  • 0 Hide
    dgingeri , May 29, 2013 6:07 AM
    I have 13 Seagate drives in my various computers. Of those, I have had 3 fail, five years ago, and none since then. Their reliability has improved significantly in recent years. The old 1TB drives did have some reliability issues, but that has certainly changed. In case you didn't notice, the latest series of desktop drives, 1 to 3TB for certain, are Samsung design, and likely produced by the production facilities Samsung sold to them.
    As for enterprise drives, my lab has over 25000 drives of various manufacturers. Seagate has been, by far, the most reliable with only five failures in the last year, while being the highest minority drive in the lab at about 30%. (We have just under 8000 Seagate drives of various ages and capacities.) Toshiba 2.5" drives were by far the worst with 45 failures in the last year out of 2000 drives, all of them between one and three years old. When they first came in, the failure rate was higher. However, these are all enterprise level drives, so they should be held to a higher standard. In the desktop world, 2.25% annual failure rate may sound fairly decent. It's certainly not in the enterprise world.
    My company has now insisted that our OEM suppliers, Dell and NetApp, use only Seagate drives with the products they build for us. My company believes that Seagate is the most reliable, and the numbers from my lab are part of that proof.
  • 2 Hide
    Blazer1985 , May 29, 2013 6:41 AM
    Last time I checked they were called WD Red :-D Also my NAS confirmed :-D
  • 3 Hide
    danwat1234 , May 29, 2013 6:53 AM
    5900RPM, that's fine for specific sequential and multi-sequential tasks but not for heavy duty work. I'm sure a regular Seagate green drive would work fine in a set top box.
    A real hard drive is 7200RPM and if you want a supercharger, get a hybrid 7200RPM model with write caching. I hope they proliferate the desktop market so we can have 4TB+ 7200RPM hybrid desktop drives and I hope that Seagate continues making 7200RPM hybrid laptop drives, even though right now they're just making 5400RPM hybrid laptop drives (can be slow if data isn't cached, I'll never buy one).

    Let me guess, this is a 5x800GB platter drive?

    The 1 thing I'll give them is that it is rated for up to 70 Celsius operating temperature. Typically drives are rated at 60C. Also operating shock at 80g is a bit higher than average I think.

    Their specifications page has bad data though;http://www.seagate.com/internal-hard-drives/consumer-electronics/video-3-5-hdd/?cmpid=friendly-_-video-hdd-us
    Says only 3 watts idle power consumption even on the 4TB model, but the datasheet http://www.seagate.com/files/www-content/product-content/pipeline-fam/pipeline-hd/video-3-5-hdd/en-us/docs/video-3.5-hdd-ds1783-1-1302us.pdf
    says 5 watts, which is far more realistic.
    Also on the datasheet, a drive ready time of 15 seconds? Really? At 24watts of 12V power consumption it won't take long to spin up.
    Some of the lower capacities says <17, or 6, or 12 seconds. Sounds like firmware bloat/excessive self testing before coming online if accurate, though I doubt those numbers are accurate at all.
  • 0 Hide
    gmarsack , May 29, 2013 7:02 AM
    I use Seagate drives for my headless HP Media Center (2 x 2TB, 2 x 1TB) and they have been 100% reliable in an always on environment for close to 3 years straight up-time. I would have absolutely no complaints if something were to fail today.
  • -1 Hide
    gmarsack , May 29, 2013 7:03 AM
    I use Seagate drives for my headless HP Media Center (2 x 2TB, 2 x 1TB) and they have been 100% reliable in an always on environment for close to 3 years straight up-time. I would have absolutely no complaints if something were to fail today.
  • 4 Hide
    Branden , May 29, 2013 7:12 AM
    i've yet to see a seagate drive last 5 years, i've yet to see a WD drive die within 5 years, and i've yet to see a HGST drive die at all.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , May 29, 2013 7:12 AM
    Already have the Western Digital 4Tb drive very happy with it.
  • 2 Hide
    Non-Euclidean , May 29, 2013 8:22 AM
    With 2 full 2TB drives on my NAS, I am getting antsy waiting for a drop in 4TB drive prices...
  • 6 Hide
    lamorpa , May 29, 2013 8:44 AM
    I would like to detail my singular experience with a couple of Seagate hard drives representing 0.0000000032% of their manufacturing output and then generalize that experience to the other 99.9999999968% of drives produced in an attempt to characterize their reliability. Ready?...
  • 0 Hide
    lamorpa , May 29, 2013 8:49 AM
    I would like to detail my singular experience with a couple of Seagate hard drives representing 0.0000000032% of their manufacturing output and then generalize that experience to the other 99.9999999968% of drives produced in an attempt to characterize their reliability. Ready?...
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