Ubuntu to Launch on Galaxy Nexus in February

Canonical, the company responsible for the Linux-based Ubuntu operating system, said the platform's mobile OS will make its debut on smartphones via Samsung's Galaxy Nexus handset.

Canonical Engineering Manager Alan Pope said during CES that that the firm is aiming to launch a downloadable image of Ubuntu for the Galaxy Nexus during the latter stages of February, 2013.

The company, which unveiled the mobile platform prior to CES 2013, built the mobile OS for use on Android's drivers and kernals, consequently allowing existing Android devices to integrate Ubuntu.

Ubuntu for smartphones will launch initially for the Galaxy Nexus, which is the device Canonical has been using as its primary test and demo unit thus far.

However, features including voice control and an app store are apparently set to be missing from the initial release, with the apps which are available said to have limited functionality.

Stay tuned for a hands-on from CES.

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  • jreed38
    MatthiasBAndroid is also based on Linux -_- And yes, Android is free, but far from open source, it is developed by Google, not by a community that develops the code


    And Ubuntu is developed by Canonical, not so much by the community. And as for your use of "open source", I don't think it means what you think it means.
    15
  • Abion47
    MatthiasBAndroid is also based on Linux -_- And yes, Android is free, but far from open source, it is developed by Google, not by a community that develops the code


    source.android.com would like a word.
    14
  • WithoutWeakness
    MatthiasBAndroid is also based on Linux -_- And yes, Android is free, but far from open source, it is developed by Google, not by a community that develops the code

    Android most certainly is open source and the source code is available for download. Google does for Android what Canonical does for Ubuntu; they host it, maintain it, and determine release dates and features. Individuals can absolutely write and submit their own code to the project for use in future releases.

    Ubuntu for Android is a great step into building one ecosystem to run across all devices. The level of integration you can offer by running one operating system on phones, tablets, and laptop/desktop computers is unmatched by anything else that is out right now. Microsoft had the right idea with Windows 8 but their poor UI design and subsequent low market share is killing them. Dual and quad core phones with 1GB+ of RAM are already as powerful as low-end desktop computers and mid-range laptops from a few years ago. Putting a lightweight and extremely powerful OS like Ubuntu on them opens the doors for what can be done with these devices.
    10
  • Other Comments
  • Abion47
    I don't know, as far as freely available and open-source mobile operating systems go, Android is pretty good and stable. Do we really need a Linux-based mobile OS too? I mean, unless Ubuntu brings something really neat to the table, I don't really see a point for this other than tech-savvy hipsters getting it just to say they have it.
    -13
  • MatthiasB
    Abion47I don't know, as far as freely available and open-source mobile operating systems go, Android is pretty good and stable. Do we really need a Linux-based mobile OS too?

    Android is also based on Linux -_- And yes, Android is free, but far from open source, it is developed by Google, not by a community that develops the code
    -6
  • jreed38
    MatthiasBAndroid is also based on Linux -_- And yes, Android is free, but far from open source, it is developed by Google, not by a community that develops the code


    And Ubuntu is developed by Canonical, not so much by the community. And as for your use of "open source", I don't think it means what you think it means.
    15