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This Access Point Offers Up to 7,500 SQ FT of Wi-Fi Coverage

By - Source: Amped Wireless | B 20 comments

Later this month, Amped Wireless is launching an access point that delivers 2.4 GHz wireless coverage up to 7,500 square feet.

Amped Wireless introduced on Tuesday its new AP20000G dual-band Wireless-N access point, capable of delivering up to 7,500 square feet of local network coverage. It's packed with a 620 MHz processor to handle multiple loads of traffic, premium high power Wi-Fi 600mW 2.4 GHz amplifiers, high power 5.0 GHz Wi-Fi amplifiers and two dual band high gain antennas.

Built for coverage in large homes and businesses, the AP20000G provides five Gigabit Ethernet ports (one uplink, four LAN), a USB 2.0 port for sharing USB storage devices locally, and an intelligent plug-and-play setup. Premium software features include guest networks, adjustable Wi-Fi coverage controls, and support for the latest Wi-Fi security.

"Advanced software allows the AP20000G to automatically configure itself to a network's settings without the user's input or configuration," the company said on Tuesday. "The AP20000G simply connects to the router's network port, automatically configures itself and creates a new wireless and wired network for connecting wired or wireless computers, printers and other network devices."

According to Amped Wireless, your typical access point has a wireless output power of 50mW, and does not utilize wireless amplifiers and are equipped with antennas that have zero antenna gain. However the company's solution has dual 2.4 GHz amplifiers with 600mW of output power – dual 5 GHz amplifiers are also present. The boosted performance is optimally tuned with dual high gain 5dBi detachable dual band antennas for maximum range and performance.

As the company states, this gadget is not a router – it's a high power dual band access point that physically connects to your existing router by way of a Gigabit Ethernet connection. That said, the wireless aspect of your router essentially isn't needed, as the AP20000G could handle all the wireless connectivity thanks to its range. However, the 5 GHz coverage isn't quite as widespread as the 2.4 GHz band, so your router may get some use after all if it's dual-band.

To some degree, that's unfortunate: consumers really need a highly amplified 5 GHz band with 600mW of output power to cover 7,500 square feet. That's because it's less used than the 2.4 GHz wireless highway which typically is congested with traffic from most household wireless gadgets. The 5 GHz band is also less capable of penetrating through walls, thus users are required to keep close proximity to a dual-band router to get good data throughput.

Still, this gadget promises to penetrate walls and eliminate Wi-Fi dead spots, but it's unclear as to how far its 5 GHz band will reach. The AP20000G has a retail price of $169.99 and is available now for pre-order from the Amped Wireless web store. It will be available nationwide late September.

Update: Amped Wireless offered a little more info about the access point's 5 GHz range. "The 5 GHz band is slightly lower in power than the 2.4 GHz (roughly 500mW)," a rep told Tom's. "5 GHz technology has less range in general however we rate our 5 GHz range at 5000 sq ft after our amplification and high gain antenna additions."

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  • 6 Hide
    house70 , September 19, 2012 11:45 AM
    " high power 5.0 GHz Wi-Fi amplifiers" "dual 5 GHz amplifiers are also present"
    "However, the 5 GHz coverage isn't amplified"

    Anyone else finds this confusing?
  • 0 Hide
    vk_87 , September 19, 2012 12:14 PM
    600mW of power is pretty high. I think its time we have some sort of rating system like SAR for cellphones about the power levels.
  • 0 Hide
    belardo , September 19, 2012 12:29 PM
    Flux Capacitor Jr?
  • Display all 20 comments.
  • -2 Hide
    thecolorblue , September 19, 2012 12:47 PM
    vk_87600mW of power is pretty high. I think its time we have some sort of rating system like SAR for cellphones about the power levels.

    what ever for?

    why put a totally meaningless rating on any device when it only serves up to feed on people's irrational fears. pseudoscience is pseudoscience, EMF fields do not cause cancer... actual sciencehas proven that thereis No Detectable Risk of cancer from EMF fields.

    consider the dead horse beaten to death, stop beating it please
  • 5 Hide
    techcurious , September 19, 2012 12:48 PM
    house70" high power 5.0 GHz Wi-Fi amplifiers" "dual 5 GHz amplifiers are also present""However, the 5 GHz coverage isn't amplified"Anyone else finds this confusing?

    Apparently, everyone except Kevin Parrish find that dribble confusing... I wonder how much of his articles he actually writes and how much of it is simple Copy/Paste..
  • 3 Hide
    dalmvern , September 19, 2012 1:03 PM
    7500 sqft? That is something like a 50 foot radius...am I missing something? I mean I understand how they say its not a router and even crappy routers have a 50 foot radius range, but what is the significance? Its not going to help with traffic load, its just distributing it differently and you will be able to sit a little bit further away from the router, so good news if you have a house too big for a normal router to service.
  • -1 Hide
    blazorthon , September 19, 2012 1:51 PM
    dalmvern7500 sqft? That is something like a 50 foot radius...am I missing something? I mean I understand how they say its not a router and even crappy routers have a 50 foot radius range, but what is the significance? Its not going to help with traffic load, its just distributing it differently and you will be able to sit a little bit further away from the router, so good news if you have a house too big for a normal router to service.


    It should have excellent connectivity even where what would normally be dead spots. That's something to consider.
  • 2 Hide
    techcurious , September 19, 2012 2:08 PM
    dalmvern7500 sqft? That is something like a 50 foot radius...am I missing something? I mean I understand how they say its not a router and even crappy routers have a 50 foot radius range.

    Indeed, even a Trendnet Wireless G Access Point selling for $31 @ newegg is claiming
    "50 to 100 meters indoor, 100 to 300 meters outdoors depending on the environment."
    This is a great article... not..
  • 1 Hide
    Jim_L9 , September 19, 2012 2:41 PM
    I suspect they mean it will provide coverage in a building of up to 7,500 Sq. Ft.
  • 0 Hide
    sporkimus , September 19, 2012 3:09 PM
    Jim_L9I suspect they mean it will provide coverage in a building of up to 7,500 Sq. Ft.

    Yeah, while it will not extended coverage beyond normal wireless routers, the signal strength is probably vastly superior in regards to being able to go through multiple walls of varying material.
  • 3 Hide
    razor512 , September 19, 2012 4:32 PM
    Stupid thing to boast about. Most routers in the $70 range are offering between 500 and 600 mw transmit power

    This would have been special about 7 years ago when premium routers were giving 45 to 50 mw but with todays n routers, if you look up the fccid, you will see that you get 600 mw for around $70
  • 1 Hide
    fuzzion , September 19, 2012 5:18 PM
    Im still sticking with my cisco
  • -2 Hide
    shin0bi272 , September 19, 2012 5:48 PM
    using the formula d= square root of (4A/π) if A is 7500 that gives a circle with a diameter of 31ft... whoopity do
  • 0 Hide
    warbler boy , September 19, 2012 5:55 PM
    Engenius has been offering this for years, and at a lower price. They have units that can go straight-line up to 10 Km.
  • 0 Hide
    blazorthon , September 19, 2012 6:02 PM
    shin0bi272using the formula d= square root of (4A/π) if A is 7500 that gives a circle with a diameter of 31ft... whoopity do


    Assuming that the square foot measure is a circle around the access point, a 50 foot radius is the proper radius. 50 feet squared is 2500 feet, multiplied by about 3 to account for pi and you get 7500 feet. The radius is a little under 50 feet because pi is a little more than 3, but still. A more accurate radius would be approximately 49 feet, but given that this is a WiFi device's rated connectivity radius, you shouldn't try to be too accurate for it. Area for a circle is (Pi)(radius)^2.
  • 1 Hide
    glasssplinter , September 19, 2012 8:18 PM
    High power is great and all but remember that wireless is a two way signal. With a FM radio a station pumps out thousands of watts of signal power they can reach all corners of the desired market. But the people listening to it don't have to worry about transmitting back to the source. With wireless someone could amplify the signal a great amount but unless the other device can "reach" back the whole design is worthless.
  • -2 Hide
    shin0bi272 , September 19, 2012 8:34 PM
    blazorthonAssuming that the square foot measure is a circle around the access point, a 50 foot radius is the proper radius. 50 feet squared is 2500 feet, multiplied by about 3 to account for pi and you get 7500 feet. The radius is a little under 50 feet because pi is a little more than 3, but still. A more accurate radius would be approximately 49 feet, but given that this is a WiFi device's rated connectivity radius, you shouldn't try to be too accurate for it. Area for a circle is (Pi)(radius)^2.


    A=πr2= πd2/4

    d2=4A/π

    d= square root of (4A/π)

  • 0 Hide
    razor512 , September 19, 2012 10:34 PM
    just feel that this needs to be shows,

    average cheap $50-60 router from 2011 (google router fccid and pick a few and look them up on the FCC website)




    here is a dbm to watt chart

    http://www.cpcstech.com/dbm-to-watt-conversion-information.htm

    you will see that there is no need to spend $170 for 600mw of transmit power

    (Also some of the higher end $150-200 routers from companies such as netgear will over over 600mw, generally around 800mw+ of power)

    Now lets look at a router from 10 years ago (one of my favorite routers, the WRT54G)



    yep if you look at that chart, right around 45mw of transmit power.

    They are basically comparing their 2012 router, to routers from nearly 10 years ago just so that they can justify their insane prices.

    PS from 2002 to 2012 and probably beyond, most routers that do not use high gain antennas, will use a 2.5 to 3dbi antenna, and the ones with internal antennas will attempt to account for you not being able to position the antennas by using a combination of 2.5 and 1.8db antennas (the higher the gain, the more directional the signal becomes and thus the less hight it can handle.

    if you live in a 3+ floor house, a 3dbi antenna will give you better coverage than a 7 dbi antenna (average high gain antenna) but if you are okay with a little bit of modding, you can easily add rp-sma connectors to almost any router with internal antennas, and then use 20db gain antennas if you want. (7-9db antennas are good for single level homes) and for multi level homes it is best not to go over 5db unless you are okay with positioning the antennas in a way where it aims to a specific area in the upper level of the home.
  • 2 Hide
    jeffjwatts , September 20, 2012 12:27 AM
    shin0bi272A=πr2= πd2/4d2=4A/πd= square root of (4A/π)


    You've got your math wrong.

    a=pi*r^2
    r^2=a/pi
    r=Sqroot(a/pi)

    r=sqroot(7,500/3.14) = 48.8
  • 1 Hide
    remixedcat , November 12, 2012 7:30 AM
    I have this access point and it does have hardcore coverage. I can easily get 5 bars all over my mixed construction house (spanning several decades and some walls have plaster and I also have dropped celings with flourescent lights like you see in offices) I can walk outside and about 150 feet away can stream youtube vids with not much problems.

    Average RSSI Values: (using the Amped Wireless Analytics tool for Android)
    Amped Wireless AP20000G: 30-50ft avg. @ -22 to -32dBm/50-75ft avg. @ -47dBm/ 170ft @ -72dBm

    while my netgear wgr614 was -75dBm at around 30ft away and -82dBm to -92dBm on the back porch and was only 1 or 2 bars tops. I get 4-5 bars on the back porch with the amped wireless access point. I have a huge thick metal door and my access point is upstairs on the opposite end of the house and I have a thick staircase.

    on the laptop I get 5 bars all over the house as well as the back porch. it's got a built in atheros adapter.