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Adobe Announces 'Ink' Stylus and 'Slide' Ruler for iOS

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 6 comments

Adobe is aggressively moving into the 'mobile' space this year. Actually, no. Let's rephrase that: Adobe is aggressively moving into the iOS space this year, and basically ignoring Android. The company has introduced its Ink 'Creative Cloud Pen' and Slide 'Digital Ruler' for use with their new iOS apps, Line and Sketch.

Line is a line drawing tool meant for drafting-type drawings under iOS. It provides straight lines, circles and French curves for creating drawings in plan, elevation and perspective views. Sketch, meanwhile, is more of a freeform drawing tool meant to more closely imitate the experience of drawing using traditional media. Both work with the Ink as a drawing tool, but in demonstrations during their presentation on Wednesday there was a perceptible lag when using the pen. Drawing directly with a pen on a screen greatly improves the digital drawing and sketching experience, but having perceptible lag can work against that.

The Ink 'pen' tool allows the storage of various user tools, brushes, presets and palettes in the Creative Cloud. When you go to use your pen on another designer's iPad, it will fetch your settings from the cloud and will be right there with you, making the Ink not just 'a pen,' but your pen.

Photoshop Mix is a new application for image compositing and masking on the iPad, allowing you to edit applications using the power of Photoshop while on your iPad. A portion of Photoshop's powerful filters, like Content-Aware Fill and Camera Shake Reduction, are available via 'cloud-based imaging technology' in this application -- it sounds a lot like the images are being processed in the cloud instead of locally.

Lightroom Mobile (like Lightroom, but mobile) is able to load images from smartphones, tablets, and DSLRs just like its desktop cousin. Edits, processes and organization performed with it on your iPad can be synced back to your desktop.

As part of its mobile push, Adobe also announced a new Creative SDK that allows access to files in the Creative cloud, and includes methods for accessing elements within PSDs. It also allows the use of cloud image editing services like the aforementioned Content-aware Fill within your app. The Adobe Creative SDK was used to build Photoshop Mix and is currently targeted for iOS development. It is being tested by select iOS developers and is expected to enter into a comprehensive beta shortly.

Adobe Sketch, Line and Photoshop Mix are free applications available for IOS devices through the Apple App Store. Ink and Slide are packaged together and available via Adobe.com for $199.99.

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  • 0 Hide
    DarkSable , June 21, 2014 10:18 AM
    So why are they going the iOS only route? Most drawing tablets, if not proprietary, run android.

    Wondering if it's part of Apple desperately trying to hang on to the "Macs are your only option for art" thing. It would explain their ipad composer ads, too.
  • -1 Hide
    Draven35 , June 21, 2014 10:54 PM
    Quote:
    So why are they going the iOS only route? Most drawing tablets, if not proprietary, run android.

    Wondering if it's part of Apple desperately trying to hang on to the "Macs are your only option for art" thing. It would explain their ipad composer ads, too.


    Yes, that's at least part of it. Apple really wants to hand on to their art-geek roots, even though most high-end animation and VFX is done in windows and Linux.
  • -3 Hide
    ericburnby , June 23, 2014 9:51 PM
    Quote:
    So why are they going the iOS only route? Most drawing tablets, if not proprietary, run android.


    Because nobody does anything on Android tablets. All companies that track usage statistics prove this. I wonder if those gazillion Android tablets are nothing more than door stops or TV remote controls, because they're not showing up anywhere (like Internet browsing, for example).
  • 1 Hide
    Draven35 , June 23, 2014 10:57 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    So why are they going the iOS only route? Most drawing tablets, if not proprietary, run android.


    Because nobody does anything on Android tablets. All companies that track usage statistics prove this. I wonder if those gazillion Android tablets are nothing more than door stops or TV remote controls, because they're not showing up anywhere (like Internet browsing, for example).


    Yup, nobody does drawing on Android tablets. Nobody has bought a Tegra Note to use as a sketchpad.

    Ok, all sarcasm aside, I got a HP Slate 7 Extreme... (HP's Tegra Note) for just that use.
  • 0 Hide
    BranFlake5 , June 24, 2014 9:41 AM
    If someone was really serious about a drawing tablet, they wouldn't use an iPad, they would be using this http://cintiqcompanion.wacom.com/CintiqCompanionHybrid/en/ or something similar.
  • 0 Hide
    Draven35 , June 24, 2014 1:31 PM
    Quote:
    If someone was really serious about a drawing tablet, they wouldn't use an iPad, they would be using this http://cintiqcompanion.wacom.com/CintiqCompanionHybrid/en/ or something similar.



    Most people 'really serious about drawing' use a sketchpad, and a wacom tablet with their PC or laptop... or a Surface Pro... the surface pro 1 and 2 use Wacom technology to provide a perfectly good drawing tablet at half the price of a Wacom Companion.