TSMC Contracted as 64-Bit ARM Foundry for Next-gen Chips

ARM and TSMC entered in a "multi-year agreement" that "extends beyond 20 nm technology" to enable the production of next-gen ARMv8 processors that use FinFET transistors and leverages the ARM's Artisan IP that currently covers a production process range from 250 nm to 20 nm.

"By working closely with TSMC, we are able to leverage TSMC's ability to quickly ramp volume production of highly integrated SoCs in advanced silicon process technology," said Simon Segars, executive vice president and general manager, Processor and Physical IP Divisions, ARM. "The ongoing deep collaboration with TSMC provides customers earlier access to FinFET technology to bring high-performance, power-efficient products to market."

ARM unveiled its 64-bit architecture in October of last year and said that ARMv8 chips will be targeted ant consumer and enterprise markets. First processors are expected to be announced later this year, while prototype servers running the processors are unlikely to surface until early 2014. ARM said that TSMC's FinFET process "promises impressive speed and power improvements as well as leakage reduction", which the company hopes will contribute to help solve the problem of scaling SoCs in high-volume production.

 

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  • wiinippongamer
    chromonoidI know this might sound idiotic but wasnt ARM a diferent architecture than x86 (x32)CPUs... i mean a few years back we had x86(x32) CPUs only and now x64 CPUs... i didnt know ARM was based on x86 i guess you learn something new everyday


    64-bit doesn't mean x86_64. And ARM isn't based on x86.
    10
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  • boiler1990
    This could put a lot of pressure on Intel's Medfield and future mobile chips. TSMC is having issues with NVIDIA's and AMD's 28nm GPUs, but only because they are a fabrication foundry and are contracted to manufacture specified chip designs. If they work in-house with ARM, many of those problems will be erased since they're partnering manufacturing with development.
    2
  • boiler1990
    chromonoidI know this might sound idiotic but wasnt ARM a diferent architecture than x86 (x32)CPUs... i mean a few years back we had x86(x32) CPUs only and now x64 CPUs... i didnt know ARM was based on x86 i guess you learn something new everyday

    ARM isn't based on x86, but they have implemented a 64-bit architecture in their newest designs, which is half of the point of the article. This could spawn an Atom direct competitor in the mobile space (beyond phones/tablets).
    3
  • wiinippongamer
    chromonoidI know this might sound idiotic but wasnt ARM a diferent architecture than x86 (x32)CPUs... i mean a few years back we had x86(x32) CPUs only and now x64 CPUs... i didnt know ARM was based on x86 i guess you learn something new everyday


    64-bit doesn't mean x86_64. And ARM isn't based on x86.
    10