Chip Industry Had Tough Nov '11; Expects Long Term Growth

Compared to last year, the sharp was even greater: The global chip industry sold semiconductors for $25.93 billion in November 2010. The good news is that, on a year to date basis, chip sales are 0.8 percent ahead of 2010.

"Supply chain disruptions resulting from the floods in Thailand have impacted semiconductor sales in the near term, however OEM's are expected to recover production losses over the course of the next few months," said Brian Toohey, president of the Semiconductor Industry Association. "November sales were additionally affected by the continuing European financial crisis which is having a broad impact on other economies and global demand."

The SIA believes that the chip industry has ended 2011 with a gain over 2010. Even if the trade organization believes that there are "near term challenges", it stated that 2012 will bring "further improvement".

November 2011




Billions




Month-to-Month Sales                               




Market

Last Month

Current Month

% Change

Americas

4.67

4.59

-1.8%

Europe

3.08

3.03

-1.8%

Japan

3.88

3.82

-1.7%

Asia Pacific

14.10

13.70

-2.9%

Total

25.74

25.13

-2.4%





Year-to-Year Sales                          




Market

Last Year

Current Month

% Change

Americas

4.71

4.59

-2.5%

Europe

3.42

3.03

-11.5%

Japan

4.16

3.82

-8.2%

Asia Pacific

13.64

13.70

0.4%

Total

25.93

25.13

-3.1%





Three-Month-Moving Average Sales




Market

Jun /Jul /Aug

Sep /Oct /Nov

% Change

Americas

4.58

4.59

0.1%

Europe

3.07

3.03

-1.4%

Japan

3.64

3.82

4.7%

Asia Pacific

13.79

13.70

-0.6%

Total

25.08

25.13

0.2%

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9 comments
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  • Well, Ivy-Bridge should do pretty well this year and stimulate some sales. There are way too many newly developing markets for any slowdown to last too long, in my view.
    -1
  • from my point of view, old sata is still good enough, old usb2 is still good enough, 'olde' ddr3 still good enough, and graphics showing little improvement, screens still the same (lcd tv all in one) and good enough.

    What compelling reason is their to get new kit for a higher price (new AMD lol chips, hard drives skyrocket).

    The market is also pretty saturated (in 'developed' nations) where there is pretty much a PC/Laptop or 2 in every home.

    The only real reason to get new computers is for work (computational needs), playing facebook browser games along with games being held back by consoles are still fine.

    e8500 + 4870x2, not a single compelling reason to upgrade.

    That is, if the article were talking about desktops/laptops.

    Phones however, could always be better, and they are more suseptable to damage/loss. Not to mention the 'fad' factor. Growth in phones, but decline in desktops in my opinion, purely due to lack of anything domestic putting a strain on desktop resources.
    -3
  • billybobserfrom my point of view, old sata is still good enough, old usb2 is still good enough


    USB2 is nowhere near good enough. Even USB 3 can be a limiting factor in transfer speeds.
    5