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Zalman Wants You Designing... [CLOSED!]

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 214 comments

Get creative!

You tweak, you mod, you squeeze the most out of your system. But, wouldn't it be great, if you can get your favorite component manufacturer to design things the way you want?

That's exactly what Zalman wants.

Famous for its CPU-cooling solutions, Zalman is no stranger to overclockers. It was the first manufacturer to take silent, and fanless, coolers to the mainstream, and now to take things to the next level, Zalman wants your help. Come up with several creative ideas, and post them into the comments. We'll gather up all the feedback and give them Zalman.

The company wants creative ideas for the following:

- heatsink designs utilizing fans
- heatsink designs without fans
- liquid-cooling ideas

And if you so choose, any other creative hybrid designs you can think of. Basically, what would you use in your system if you were given the task of head-designer?

The top 3 ideas will win some prizes. We'll let everyone know the ideas picked in 2 weeks when Zalman tells us. So get started!

[UPDATE]

Zalman has picked 3 winners! Congratualations to:

- Someguynamedmatt
- Andon48
- ProDigit80

I will PM each directly with information on how to proceed. Congrats again to the three who were picked!

Display 214 Comments.
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Top Comments
  • 19 Hide
    tburns1 , August 3, 2010 6:25 PM
    It should definitely smell like bacon. Everyone likes bacon. Unless you don't. I'm hungry ...
  • 17 Hide
    Anonymous , August 3, 2010 5:50 PM
    they should try using a metal fir tree design to maximize surface area( like nature)
  • 10 Hide
    the_krasno , August 3, 2010 5:52 PM
    I'd like a mainstream liquid cooling solution for graphics cards. Current options rely on the user being already familiar with liquid cooling and having it for the processor.
    A guy that is just getting into overclocking won't be sure of what cooling solutions are best for both a CPU and a GPU! If they make a relatively easy to understand system for that it could really boost liquid cooling's popularity, particularly for the GPU!
Other Comments
  • -8 Hide
    theshonen8899 , August 3, 2010 5:37 PM
    Heatpipe Direct Touch.
  • -7 Hide
    IM0001 , August 3, 2010 5:40 PM
    No less than 12 Heatpipes. 100% copper. 2 120mm puller/pusher fans. The pusher will be between the heatpipes right above the CPU block. (Also make sure the heatpipes are on only 2 sides the the pusher fan could be replaced if need be. Blowing air up through fins that are curved toward the rear of the case where a puller fan would help pull the air through the fins and out the back of the case.

    Yes it would be a large fan.
  • 3 Hide
    dman3k , August 3, 2010 5:44 PM
    I want to send them the Noctua heatsink prototypes but with direct touch...
  • 1 Hide
    theshonen8899 , August 3, 2010 5:44 PM
    Yeah if Zalman had Heatpipe Direct Touch coolers, the coolers would be the most amazing combination of cooling, quality, and value ever witnessed in the cooling industry.
  • 3 Hide
    theshonen8899 , August 3, 2010 5:45 PM
    Heatsinks with replaceable fans would be fantastic too.
  • 17 Hide
    Anonymous , August 3, 2010 5:50 PM
    they should try using a metal fir tree design to maximize surface area( like nature)
  • -9 Hide
    unholygregor , August 3, 2010 5:50 PM
    A heatsink with shorter heatpipes, this will make the aluminium fins sit closer to the motherboard. and give more space in the case to make the fins bigger and increase surface area. A fan will be mounted on the fins which blows air out of the case, and because the whole unit is closer to the motherboard, the fan will draw air across the ram and northbridge more efficiently.


    For watercoolig, a cpu block which is extended to cover the chipset would be very useful, since consumers would only have to buy one waterblock and have 2 bases covered.
  • 10 Hide
    the_krasno , August 3, 2010 5:52 PM
    I'd like a mainstream liquid cooling solution for graphics cards. Current options rely on the user being already familiar with liquid cooling and having it for the processor.
    A guy that is just getting into overclocking won't be sure of what cooling solutions are best for both a CPU and a GPU! If they make a relatively easy to understand system for that it could really boost liquid cooling's popularity, particularly for the GPU!
  • 4 Hide
    domenic , August 3, 2010 5:52 PM
    I'll get started on Solidworks flow simulation
  • 0 Hide
    mtd324 , August 3, 2010 5:56 PM
    Is it possible to make a small scale phase change cooler just for the CPU?
    Or is the hardware required just too big/heavy?



  • 2 Hide
    Andon48 , August 3, 2010 5:57 PM
    I always thought it would be awesome to have a heatsink fan that has a couple of flexible tubes attached that would catch some of the air from the fan so you could direct the tubes to blow air on other components such as your ram or the memory chips on your video card. It would need to be a very strong fan and catch the air before it passed through the heatsink.
  • 3 Hide
    VTOLfreak , August 3, 2010 6:03 PM
    A liquid cooling solution thats factory sealed so you only have to bolt down the water-block\pump and mount the radiator somewhere in the case.

    All the hoses should be attached and the unit pre-filled. The radiator should be at least an 3x120 unit. However I don't want a radiator thats 360mm long, I want it stacked with a single or dual 120mm fan. So you end up with this cube looking unit that will easily mount in 3 5.25 bays and pushes the hot air out of the front of the case. The pump should have a 4wire connection to the motherboard CPU fan header for monitoring and integrated fan controller for the fan on the radiator (Easy, just relay the PWM signal coming from the motherboard.)

    Also, because its a pre-filled unit it could use any type of coolant, it doesn't have to be water. If some sort of oil would perform better or stop corrosion I would use that instead of water.

    Basically a souped-up version of the corsair H50. :p 
  • -2 Hide
    FUtomNOreg , August 3, 2010 6:03 PM
    Go old school and drop the radiator stack of fins. Something like a pin fin heatsink but using dozens of individual heatpipes.
  • -3 Hide
    evillman , August 3, 2010 6:04 PM
    Can we send some Google Sketchup models with real dimensions?
  • 2 Hide
    El_Capitan , August 3, 2010 6:06 PM
    Is one of the top 3 prizes a job designing heatsinks at Zalman?
  • 0 Hide
    RADIO_ACTIVE , August 3, 2010 6:06 PM
    Detachble... the ability to remove the block from the fan and pipes during install maybe male to female connectors. That way you can attach the block to the board and then simply insert the pipes and fan on. It can be a royal pain in the @$* during install raching around large heatsinks and fans. I don't know if this will affect heat dispursion, it may but its an idea.
  • -3 Hide
    pjmelect , August 3, 2010 6:08 PM
    I have often thought that it would be a good idea if the copper area that makes contact with the CPU was gold plated. It wouldn't add much to the cost of the heatsink yet it would dramatically improve heat conduction to the heatsink from the CPU.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , August 3, 2010 6:11 PM
    I propose a design whereby the fan is enclosed between the two sets of copper heatsink blades in a radial arrangement, with heat pipes. Basically similar to the heat sink design shown at the top of this article, except for the following:

    1. The two halves, each with its own set of heat pipes, are assembled similar to example above, i.e. attached by screws to the common base. Thus they enclose the fan from all sides, increasing airflow efficiency, decreasing noise, and making it impossible for any loose object or cable to block the fan blades.

    2. One or both halves may be user-detachable (using high quality thermal grease if needed) to allow dis-assembly for fan replacement or cleaning.

    3. Copper fins are curved in the direction of airflow, making them work like static turbine blades and cutting down noise.

    4. Copper fins are trimmed on the outside to form a rounded-corner cube rather than a cylinder. This optimizes the cooling area in a given space inside the case.

    -- Alex K. NY
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