Diamond Announces Xtreme Sound 7.1 Sound Card

Diamond Multimedia has announced a brand new sound card, the Diamond Xtreme Sound 7.1. Actually, the card's full name is "Diamond Xtreme Sound 7.1 PCI-e Low Profile 24 Bit Record and Playback Internal Sound Card," but that doesn't exactly roll off the tongue.

 

The Diamond Xtreme Sound 7.1 offers 7.1 surround sound and support for 24-bit 192 KHz / 96 KHz / 48 KHz / 44.1 KHz playback and 24-bit 192 KHz / 96 KHz / 48 KHz / 44.1 KHz recording. Compatible with Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista and Windows XP, the card features 7.1 channel output, 4 x 3.5 mm stereo outputs for front R/L, rear R/L, side R/L and center/subwoofer, 3.5 mm stereo connectors for line-in, 2 x RCA connectors for coaxial input and output, 2 x optical connectors for SPDIF input and output, as well as HD audio link for front audio. There's also anti-Pop protection circuitry as well as support for special effects (including concert hall).

The Diamond Xtreme Sound 7.1 PCI-e Low Profile 24-bit Record and Playback Internal Sound Card is already available at the Diamond Multimedia Online Store as well as authorized resellers including Amazon, Fry's Electronics, NCIX, Newegg, Tiger Direct, Futureshops and Best Buy Canada. Priced at $59.99, the card carries the model number 'XS71HD' (just in case you had problems remembering its full name).

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  • ShadyHamster
    Anonymous said:
    people still buy sound cards?


    I'd take a sound card over onboard realtek junk any day.
    10
  • Other Comments
  • nolarrow
    people still buy sound cards?
    -11
  • ShadyHamster
    Anonymous said:
    people still buy sound cards?


    I'd take a sound card over onboard realtek junk any day.
    10
  • waxdart
    nolarrow, yes.
    I got mine to fix the lack of shielding with interefence/ motherboard noise which started to really bothered me. Listening to webpages load up via squeaks from the speaks was awful. A better motherboard would have cost more and I just wanted to spend money and a soundcard was that next thing.
    They don't cost that much and my Xonar is way better than the on the motherboard sound.
    The difference between the HDMI bypassing the soundcard and then hooking it back in is noticeable for games and it really makes films better.
    Also, my large headphones need a bit more power to drive them an the output from the motherboard doesn't cut it. The sound card is able to. In an ideal world I'd have an AMP to drive them. They far too much.
    After you go back to a dedicated card to realise just how bad the motherboard options really are.
    1