Distance Alpha Racing Game Released to Kickstarter Backers

Refract Studios has been working hard on Distance since it was officially funded by Kickstarter back on November 16, 2012. That effort seems to have paid off, as the spiritual successor of Nitronic Rush has started strutting its stuff in the form of an alpha version for Kickstarter backers. Last week, the Refract Studios team sent out a web blast announcing that the Distance alpha would be available for all backers with alpha access ($55 pledge or higher). If you're a backer, make sure to check your email and redeem your code to download the game! Refract Studios has teamed up with Humble Bundle to distribute all the game codes and private backer-only forum access codes. Hopefully, that means that in the future, when new codes are released for other platforms, you'll be able to download them all from your centralized Humble Bundle page!

The game alpha is currently being distributed on both Steam and as a stand-alone installer, however, Refract Studios recommends the Steam version for one major reason. Updating the game on the stand-alone version requires you to re-download the entire game build, while using the Steam version allows for players to download small incremental updates.

If you're unfamiliar with Distance at this point, think of it as an arcade style racing game with multiple interesting game modes and a very retro Neon art style. To quote from Refract Studios themselves,

In short, it's Trials Evolution + Rush 2049 + Halo + Tron. The game takes the intense action of arcade racing and fuses it with the exploration of an atmospheric world.

Distance is definitely a fairly unique game that we look forward to hearing more about in the future! Even if you're not big into racing games, the unique gameplay combining track-racing and open-world exploration are definitely worth checking out. If you'd like to read more on Distance or to pre-order the game (which gets you beta access when it comes out), please check out the official links below:

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  • Grandmastersexsay
    What a scam this crowd funding nonsense is. Good ideas don't have trouble finding funding, and video games require very little funding.

    Why don't the creators of this game just produce their product then sell it to the public like everyone else? Video games can get a beta tester out for virtually nothing but time invested. Minecraft was literally written by one guy. So the creators of this game want you to invest your hard earned money but they won't invest their own time without compensation? Doesn't sound like they have a lot of faith in their own product.

    I hope too many people don't fall for this crowd funding nonsense.

    I also get the feeling Tom's Hardware is getting payed by Kickstarter to put out all these crowd funding stories.
    -4
  • Anonymous
    @Grandmastersexsay are you trolling? Games require a lot of money and time. And remember, time is money. These people can't afford to work on the game without money. And this funding basically allows the developer to live properly, giving them time to develop. Crowd Funding is great, it allows people to invest in things that they want, and without it, small companies wouldn't get a chance at the big time these days as the industries become more split between the big companies and small ones. Ouya and Gamestick would not exist if it wasn't for crowd funding. Also Minecraft was made by a few people actually and took a lot of time, it was also released during alpha stages so they could earn money. But the developers still need to have some money to survive during development before release
    5
  • Grandmastersexsay
    Anonymous said:
    @Grandmastersexsay are you trolling? Games require a lot of money and time. And remember, time is money. These people can't afford to work on the game without money. And this funding basically allows the developer to live properly, giving them time to develop. Crowd Funding is great, it allows people to invest in things that they want, and without it, small companies wouldn't get a chance at the big time these days as the industries become more split between the big companies and small ones. Ouya and Gamestick would not exist if it wasn't for crowd funding. Also Minecraft was made by a few people actually and took a lot of time, it was also released during alpha stages so they could earn money. But the developers still need to have some money to survive during development before release


    Whatever happened to people using business and personal loans to fund a business venture? With crowd funding, the borrowers have no stake in the game. It's their venture, shouldn't it be their risk?

    Are you with Kickstarter?
    -5