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Dell, HP, IBM Are the Greenest Companies

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 26 comments

Dell seems to be the best at loving the earth.

These days running a good business is more than just about profits and putting out a product that sells; businesses also need to be mindful of their environmental impact. Newsweek has ranked the top 500 publicly traded companies in the U.S. and tech companies dominate the top spots.

Out of the top 10, eight of them are technology companies, perhaps showing that the tech sector either cares most about the environment, or is able to retool quickly to respond to environmental factors better than any other industry.

The greenest company, according to Newsweek, is Dell. Following closely at second and third by Hewlett-Packard and IBM.

Intel comes it at number five, followed by Sprint Nextel, Adobe Systems, Applied Materials and Yahoo! AMD and Cisco were in the top 20 at twelfth and thirteenth, respectively.

Some industry onlookers are surprised that Apple didn't place higher, given its recent efforts in using recyclable materials, but Newsweek put it at 65th spot.

Microsoft placed 29th, Google made 36th and Motorola was 43rd.

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Top Comments
  • 21 Hide
    Nesto1000 , October 20, 2010 1:34 PM
    Steve Jobs rebuttal:
    You're recycling wrong!
  • 14 Hide
    deweycd , October 20, 2010 1:32 PM
    A company that tells you to replace your printer to get new ink instead of refilling/replacing the ink cartrage is the greenest? How can that be?
  • 10 Hide
    Parsian , October 20, 2010 2:30 PM
    i dont believe this report until i see their procedure. How can a software company scores less than a company that sells hardware?
Other Comments
  • 2 Hide
    lukeiamyourfather , October 20, 2010 1:15 PM
    Is anyone else a surprised that Dell is ranked first?
  • 14 Hide
    deweycd , October 20, 2010 1:32 PM
    A company that tells you to replace your printer to get new ink instead of refilling/replacing the ink cartrage is the greenest? How can that be?
  • -8 Hide
    Anonymous , October 20, 2010 1:33 PM
    Well, since Dell is selling less and less computer, they ARE reducing the carbon footprint.
  • 21 Hide
    Nesto1000 , October 20, 2010 1:34 PM
    Steve Jobs rebuttal:
    You're recycling wrong!
  • 2 Hide
    robwright , October 20, 2010 2:04 PM
    Dell was actually well ahead of the curve. The company made its fortune on supply chain optimization -- rather than design or innovation -- which enabled it to sell PCs direct to customer for less than, say, HP or Gateway back in the day. Dell essentially figured out that using cheaper, recycled material for packaging could reduce costs even further. So it wasn't a matter of Michael Dell declaring he wanted to save the environment -- far from it. It was more a matter of the company figuring out ways to make and ship its products cheaper through "green" methods.
  • 4 Hide
    cookoy , October 20, 2010 2:16 PM
    Ranking 500 companies objectively would take a lot of money and resources. Did Newsweek visit each office/plant sites to assess each one? What criteria did they used to rank? Over what period? Or let's just their word for it.
  • 10 Hide
    Parsian , October 20, 2010 2:30 PM
    i dont believe this report until i see their procedure. How can a software company scores less than a company that sells hardware?
  • 1 Hide
    tarku , October 20, 2010 2:41 PM
    I can see why apple isn't at the top. They use way too much packaging for their products. Apple tends to package everything in their own box, so 1 iPod/iPad per box, which I have never seen a company produce so much cardboard.
  • 0 Hide
    kelemvor4 , October 20, 2010 2:47 PM
    I think there's a third reason tech companies are near the top. Most of them sell "green" products because it's a big selling point to consumers, and simultaneously most tech companies eat their own dog food to cut costs - inherently making them greener as the products get greener. It's a nice convenient circle.
  • -2 Hide
    aevm , October 20, 2010 2:55 PM
    According to wikipedia, General Electric made 12.4% of the wind turbines sold in the world in 2009 (beaten only by a Danish company with 12.5%). It's definitely a public traded company and one of the top 500 by market cap (LOL, it was #1 a few years ago and it's worth 6 times more than Dell today). Doesn't that make it "green" enough for Newsweek???

    What about companies that make solar cells or electric vehicles?
  • 0 Hide
    theoutbound , October 20, 2010 3:10 PM
    How exactly can Google be 36th? When your primary business is based on a search engine and advertising, how can you not be green?
  • 0 Hide
    xenol , October 20, 2010 3:29 PM
    theoutboundHow exactly can Google be 36th? When your primary business is based on a search engine and advertising, how can you not be green?

    It's probably how big their carbon footprint is for a company of their size.

    That's what I'm guessing.
  • 2 Hide
    Bluescreendeath , October 20, 2010 4:48 PM
    Suck it hypocritical elitist apple snobs!
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , October 20, 2010 4:49 PM
    @theoutbound

    probably has something to do with the large large amounts of electricity your server farms are consuming, the kind of electricity data centers consume requires their own electrical grid, probably one of the key reasons Google decided to build their own wind farm
  • -2 Hide
    puscifer919 , October 20, 2010 5:38 PM
    BluescreendeathSuck it hypocritical elitist apple snobs!

    You do realize that 65th place is still really, really good, right?
  • 2 Hide
    moonsite , October 20, 2010 6:05 PM
    I think most of you missed the point of how this is rated. It is not rated on what product you produce but how you produce it. It is based on the processes and procedures such as if you have a recycling program or if you use recycled product and so on.
  • -1 Hide
    angelv , October 20, 2010 6:07 PM
    What a joke. Finding the cheapest place to be a polluter to manufacture products and then shipping said products around the globe doesnt make you "green".
  • 4 Hide
    Anonymous , October 20, 2010 6:08 PM
    Apple should be the less "green" company. Their product don't even have a replacable battery. Some of their desktop computers (iMacs) are so integrated that you need to replace the display when you change your computer. None of these are good for the environnement.
  • 1 Hide
    Komma , October 20, 2010 7:21 PM
    Seeing as most of the listed technology companies spend huge amounts on electricity, it's easy to see why they would want to go green to cut costs. It's also a lot easier to be green with electricity (solar panels, efficient and up to date hardware, software improvements) than actual manufacturers who have to do a lot of the dirty work, such as using lots of hazardous industrial chemicals that there isn't much room to be green with.
  • -1 Hide
    Dirty Durden , October 20, 2010 8:29 PM
    How can a company that makes the most unnatural product be green. Thank about what goes into a computer. Even worst, they make the product to be thrown away every couple years.

    By the way, this green BS is for the ignorant (IMO).
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