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LucidLogix GameXtend Aims to Extend Smartphone Battery

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 6 comments

Lucid's technology is already integrated into the Note 3.

One of the biggest issues plaguing mobile gaming is battery life. While the quality of mobile games improves and smartphone technology continues to evolve, the fact that gaming takes a serious toll on your phone's battery is still a problem. LucidLogix is hoping to solve that issue with its new GameXtend software, which it claims can extend battery life while gaming.

GameXtend is the first in what Lucid promises is a series of power efficiency software products for smartphones. The power-aware software uses a series of 'state of the art algorithms' to reduce power draw in real time, lengthening mobile play time during 2D and 3D gameplay. Though the company didn't go into the specifics of how the technology works, Lucid is confident enough in the technology to suggest it could eliminate the need for other typical battery saving measures (such as lowering the screen brightness, for example).

LucidLogix is working with manufacturers to implement GameXtend in smartphones. First up is the Galaxy Note 3. Samsung says GameXtend has allowed the company to leverage the fastest CPUs and the highest resolution screens while ensuring a fully immersive and uninterrupted experience.

The Galaxy Note 3 launched in October and packs Samsung's own octa-core Exynos 5 CPU clocked to 1.9 GHz (or a Snapdragon 800, if you're getting the LTE version over the GSM version), ARM Mali T628MP6 graphics (or Adreno 330 with the Snapdragon model), 3 GB of RAM, up to 64 GB of storage, a 13-megapixel camera, and a huge 3,200 mAh battery.

Though Lucid hasn't provided any details on how much extra play time you'll get out of the Note 3 as a result of GameXtend, the company did say that tests on the Galaxy S4 yielded an extra two to three hours of play time from a single charge.

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  • 0 Hide
    airanp , November 12, 2013 12:40 PM
    I guess it is working on my note 3 considering I am getting about the same battery life while gaming as I was on my note 2 with only a slightly bigger battery but I don't see their current implementation changing the face of mobile gaming as it still kills the battery fast.
  • 1 Hide
    Krisk7 , November 12, 2013 1:26 PM
    Vaporware until tested
  • 0 Hide
    catswold , November 12, 2013 1:33 PM
    Hope it works better than Lucid's ill-fated graphics engine that was supposed to allow the use of AMD and NVidia GPU's together (as in SLI/CrossFire).
  • 0 Hide
    heero yuy , November 12, 2013 2:30 PM
    didn't the phones Huawei came up with not long after they said they were going to take on Samsung and apple have some decent power efficiency software?
  • 0 Hide
    Xenturion , November 12, 2013 2:35 PM
    LucidLogix is definitely an interesting company. They had HydraLogix (the mixed GPU & SLI/CrossFire alternative) and Virtu. (which allows you to use Intel's QuickSync with an addon GPU) Interestingly, they don't really even mention HydraLogix on their site anymore, which is a pretty good indication of how useful it was. I suspect the reason they're being quiet about what GameXtend actually does is that it's a combination of techniques like simple frame rate caps that keep power consumption in check. I wouldn't mind being proven wrong though.
  • 0 Hide
    catswold , November 12, 2013 3:37 PM
    Quote:
    LucidLogix is definitely an interesting company. They had HydraLogix (the mixed GPU & SLI/CrossFire alternative) and Virtu. (which allows you to use Intel's QuickSync with an addon GPU) Interestingly, they don't really even mention HydraLogix on their site anymore, which is a pretty good indication of how useful it was. I suspect the reason they're being quiet about what GameXtend actually does is that it's a combination of techniques like simple frame rate caps that keep power consumption in check. I wouldn't mind being proven wrong though.

    I did a Google on Hydra and it appears that motherboard manufacturers failed to adopt it due to it's expense compared to simply going with 2 identical video cards.

    I actually had an MSI board with it and used it to run a 9800+ combined with a 460. I saw about a 40% increase in performance over the 460 alone.