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Giada Launches Mini PC for Pro Gamers

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 18 comments

In February, we reported that Giada launched a new Haswell-based barebones mini PC called the F300. Although its main focus was on the digital signage market, the spec list showed that it could also serve as the perfect home theater PC: lots of punch with a small footprint. Now the company is back with a new mini-PC that's built for PC gaming: the D2308U.

The D2308U packs an Intel Core i7-4500U Haswell processor (1.8 GHz, 3.0 GHz), Nvidia's GeForce GTX 750 Maxwell GPU with 2 GB of GDDR3 VRAM, and 8 GB (2x 4 GB) of DDR3L-1600 MHz memory. The gaming rig's storage consists of a 1 TB 2.5-inch 5400 RPM hard drive (SATA 2) and an optional mSATA SSD (SATA 3).

In addition, the D2308U provides one DVI-I port and two HDMI 1.4b ports for a triple display setup. The audio is handled by Realtek, which provides headphone and microphone jacks on the front, and a SPDIF combo jack on the back. Realtek also provides the unit's Gigabit Ethernet port, located on the back.

The mini gaming rig has Wireless N and Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity, two mini-PCI Express slots, one USB 3.0 port on the front, two USB 3.0 ports on the back, two USB 2.0 ports on the back, and one 4-in-1 card reader. There's also an on-board IR module and an infrared sensor on the front panel, and a "smart" fan keeps everything cool while owners game on care-free.

Finally, the overall dimensions are 9.05 x 2.14 x 6.83 inches, making it a great fit in the living room. This device retails for $1,099, and can be purchased at local outlets like Circuit City, CompUSA, Newegg and TigerDirect.

Based on pricing, Giada's biggest competitor could be Xi3 Corporation's $999 Piston console. This device sports an AMD Trinity processor clocked at 3.2 GHz, Radeon HD 7660G graphics, 8 GB of DDR3 RAM, and a 128 GB SSD. If you want to add your own memory and hard drive, Gigabyte sells a BRIX gaming barebones PC for around $489.99. This mini-rig includes an Intel Core i5-4570R processor, Iris Pro 5200 graphics, support for 2.5-inch hard drives and two SO-DIMM DDR3L slots for memory.

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  • 8 Hide
    Snipergod87 , July 17, 2014 12:16 PM
    As I was reading this I was thinking ok, this would be reasonable for 500-600 bucks, but it is nowhere near that price.
  • 3 Hide
    2Be_or_Not2Be , July 17, 2014 12:35 PM
    The comment about it's biggest competitor based on pricing seems off. Sure, the pricing might be the same, but an AMD Trinity platform + 7660G is NOT as powerful as an i7-4500U + GTX750.

    Not really a competitor at all, unless price is the only comparison!
  • 5 Hide
    larsoncc , July 17, 2014 12:46 PM
    I don't understand the obsession companies have of late - the obsession with power consumption and small form factor overrides common sense or practicality. Here we have an oddly shaped (can't stand on end), pretty plain looking box that destroys the notion of upgrades to shave 3 extra inches off and use a power brick instead of a SFF power supply. It defies logic - loss of features (processor power, no upgrade path, kinda weak-ish graphics), non-premium looks, and odd architecture "selling points" (great, it supports 3 displays - but so can anyone else with that card)... all for a $500 price premium. These companies are making systems like this "because they can" but not because the need is there. I mean really - whose TV cabinet is SO TINY that they can't use a mini-ITX case, but has room on the floor for some massive power brick? WTH is going on in these design departments?
  • Display all 18 comments.
  • 4 Hide
    thechief73 , July 17, 2014 12:58 PM
    A fool and his money....
  • 1 Hide
    2Be_or_Not2Be , July 17, 2014 1:05 PM
    Quote:
    I don't understand the obsession companies have of late - the obsession with power consumption and small form factor overrides common sense or practicality. Here we have an oddly shaped (can't stand on end), pretty plain looking box that destroys the notion of upgrades to shave 3 extra inches off and use a power brick instead of a SFF power supply. It defies logic - loss of features (processor power, no upgrade path, kinda weak-ish graphics), non-premium looks, and odd architecture "selling points" (great, it supports 3 displays - but so can anyone else with that card)... all for a $500 price premium. These companies are making systems like this "because they can" but not because the need is there. I mean really - whose TV cabinet is SO TINY that they can't use a mini-ITX case, but has room on the floor for some massive power brick? WTH is going on in these design departments?


    You're trading those features for a real decrease in size. Having a very crowded entertainment center already, I appreciate the decrease in size. At a low enough entry point, I don't care about upgrades. So this one could drop a bit in price to be really attractive.

    This could make a decent media center PC as well as a Big-Screen Steam display. You're not really losing much in the processor (that i7 turbos to 3.0GHz), and a mSATA drive will make it really snappy. Even the GTX750 is decent enough for gaming.

    It also functions well as a working desktop where you can game on it as well as using it for work-related purpose. Multiple screens are really useful in the workplace. Finally, that small footprint saves a lot of space on your desktop, in addition to adding a little wow factor when co-workers come into your office.

    Some Intel NUCs are replacing some PCs at my office, so these smaller sizes can definitely find a home.
  • 2 Hide
    mlga91 , July 17, 2014 2:18 PM
    That cpu is a real overkill, i would prefer to see i3 and i5 configurations for a home theater pc.
  • 6 Hide
    photonboy , July 17, 2014 4:22 PM
    Who wrote this TITLE?

    For "pro" gamers? Really? As in professional gamers? On a GTX750?

    Also, the i7 is a dual-core CPU (2C/4T) with a 15W TDP which makes me really nervous considering the i5-4200M is also 2C/4T but has a 37W TDP.

    So what's the deal, does the 3GHz Turbo only work with the 2nd core not running?

    Looks like a lot of compromise to save a little volume on a computer that is unlikely to be moved much. Yes, it's a niche item. but.... why would anyone buy it for that price?
  • -2 Hide
    salgado18 , July 17, 2014 5:34 PM
    Toms, please use metric system? 95% of the world doesn't know if this thing is small or large, please!
  • 3 Hide
    jasonelmore , July 17, 2014 5:55 PM
    Quote:
    Toms, please use metric system? 95% of the world doesn't know if this thing is small or large, please!

    95% of the world know what a foot is, and they also know a foot is 12 inches
  • 0 Hide
    mortsmi7 , July 17, 2014 8:54 PM
    Quote:
    Toms, please use metric system? 95% of the world doesn't know if this thing is small or large, please!

    An inch is roughly the length of your thumb tip and that is no coincidence.
  • 4 Hide
    TechieNewbie , July 17, 2014 9:11 PM
    Quote:
    Toms, please use metric system? 95% of the world doesn't know if this thing is small or large, please!


    weren't you on the internet when you wrote this? If only there were some way to search the vast amounts of information contained online for what you need to know. Like some kind of engine the drove searches. Man, whoever comes up with that idea would probably be worth at least thousands of [insert your currency of choice here].
  • 3 Hide
    RazberyBandit , July 18, 2014 1:47 AM
    LOL TechieNewbie. One could also just open Windows Calculator, Click "View" and select "Unit Conversion" to convert the dimensions. Alas, the lazy want everything just handed to them...
  • 0 Hide
    chaosmassive , July 18, 2014 4:55 AM
    GTX 750 for "Pro Gamer", seriously? to top it off using a 3 GB of GDDR3 memory? really?
  • 1 Hide
    fozzie76 , July 18, 2014 7:37 AM
    Gigabyte Brix Gaming DIY = $799 and has a desktop GTX 760. Add in 8gb of DDR3-1600 and a 480gb mSata and your still under $1100
  • 0 Hide
    TechieNewbie , July 18, 2014 9:14 AM
    Quote:
    LOL TechieNewbie. One could also just open Windows Calculator, Click "View" and select "Unit Conversion" to convert the dimensions. Alas, the lazy want everything just handed to them...


    Woah woah, did you not see my handle? That's a pretty complex maneuver for me, I'm not a hacker or something :p .

    But I shouldn't have been so rude, I live in the states, but so much of the content I watch in regards to tech is in metric so I can understand the desire to want things measured in that system. But then, if it weren't for being interested in computers I wouldn't have learned Centigrade (which has, at this point, become just a way to annoy my friends when they ask how hot I think it is outside, "Oh about 25 degrees").

  • 0 Hide
    SirTrollsALot , July 18, 2014 2:18 PM
    I got a $1000 to upgrade... I wouldn't buy these systems, cause I already have a bunch SSD, HD's, Case's, Memory, PS. I will use that $1000 for a new CPU, MOBO, and G. CARD... What ever I upgrade with run circles around these little systems... These systems are marketed to people who don't know or are not hardcore. They make it small and put the cheapest moderate components in it to keep price of making it down, then mark up the ass out of it (niche system) to sell again to people who don't know or ect..... You might as well build your own $500 system and buy xbox or PS4, whatever cash is left over buy a small mini fridge hold those nice cold beers as you have another epic encounter in DOTA or BF4 or whatever your gamer ass desires!!!
  • 0 Hide
    Thermoproduct , July 18, 2014 2:59 PM
    This is what I call innovation.
  • 0 Hide
    asven1 , July 18, 2014 7:57 PM
    I am on it going to walk over to the local circuit city and buy one of these bad boys..... Can someone tell me how to travel back in time?