Globalfoundries Accelerates Roadmap: 14nm Chips in 2014

The company is planning to catch up with Intel's manufacturing process, which is scheduled to shrink to 14 nm in late 2013.

Globalfoudnries said that its 14 nm process, called 14XM (XM stands for "extreme mobility"), will deliver 3D FinFET transistor production capability with planar technology pulled from the 20 nm process to enable a fast transition to 14 nm. For the 2014 transistor generation, Globalfoundries promises a 20 to 55 percent performance advantage over 20 nm devices, while mobile devices using these chips will be able to achieve 40 to 60 percent better battery life.

The production roadmap ties in nicely with previous announcements of an expanded collaboration with ARM that should allow Globalfoundries to attract more ARM manufacturing business. Given the fact that Intel is aggressively moving its manufacturing roadmap as well, and using its manufacturing prowess to make its SoC more competitive, the announcement from Globalfoundries indicates that we will be seeing a very competitive mobile chip market over the next few years.

 

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  • commandersozo
    jupiter optimus maximusAmazing that we were at 65nm 4 years ago and now we are going into the 14nm territory in two years. So how close to quantum computing are we now?

    The jump to quantum computing isn't a matter of getting current design standards miniaturized, it's a whole new paradigm.
    17
  • blazorthon
    Global Foundries seems to have been improving lately. Perhaps their deals with Samsung have been more beneficial than I first thought that they'd be.
    14
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  • blazorthon
    Global Foundries seems to have been improving lately. Perhaps their deals with Samsung have been more beneficial than I first thought that they'd be.
    14
  • jdwii
    I don't think they can do this, Look at their 32nm die at release and the issues it was having.
    1
  • blazorthon
    jdwiiI don't think they can do this, Look at their 32nm die at release and the issues it was having.


    Their 32nm node wasn't great, but they've had a few deals and such with Samsung, so they might pull this off. Samsung is most definitely not a slouch in manufacturing as far as I'm aware.
    7