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HP Intros Two New DreamColor Displays: HP Z27x & Z24x

By - Source: Hewlett Packard | B 11 comments

HP launched two new DreamColor displays, one of which is quite affordable.

Hewlett Packard on Monday released two new HP DreamColor displays: the HP Z27x and the Z24x. Both feature HP's second-generation DreamColor Engine and provide up to 1.07 billion on-screen colors. Compared to the previous generation, both are up to 57 percent thinner, have up to 60 percent more pixels, and contain up to a 4,000 percent increase in the internal color palette.

"The HP DreamColor Engine and our line of DreamColor products have become the gold standards for professionals who demand color accuracy," said Jun Kim, vice president and general manager, PC displays and accessories, HP. "This next generation of HP DreamColor Displays will once again disrupt color technology, providing customers with richer and more accurate colors than ever before."

The HP Z27x DreamColor Display packs three times the color accuracy over the previous generation. This display is also the first to feature HP's hostless integrated calibration engine with built-in support for third-party professional color measurement instruments. There's also Ethernet-based remote management with an integrated web server, and a published software development kit (SDK) for integrating the HP Z27x into the user's color workflows.

The specs show that this model has a 27-inch viewable image area, a 2560 x 1440 resolution @ 60, 50 or 40 Hz native sync, 178-degree viewing angles, a contrast ratio of 800:1 (minimum), and a typical response time of 12 ms GTG. The panel also has a color production of up to 1.07 billion colors, and a backlight lamp life of 50,000 hours minimum.

As for the smaller Z24x DreamColor display, this IPS panel has a 24-inch viewable area backed by LED backlighting. The panel also has a 1920 x 1200 resolution @ 60 Hz, 178-degree viewing angles, a typical contrast ratio of 1,000:1, and a typical response time of 20 ms (6 ms GTG). The display also features color support of up to 1.07 billion colors, and a backlight lamp life of 30,000 hours.

Both displays provide one-button access to presets including sRGB D65, sRGB D50, Adobe RGB, BT.709, BT.2020 and DCI-P3. Users also have the ability to create a custom color space with full control over primaries, white point and tone response. The panels even promise consistent 10-bit color accuracy from design to production with push-button color space selection and easy color calibration.

The DreamColor series is the result of a collaboration between HP, DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc., and a number of other leading studios. The goal is to create displays with accurate and consistent color from print to the big screen. Each new feature is a result of direct feedback from key advisory council members and customers looking for new ways to transform the way they work, HP's announcement reveals.

"The new DreamColor Z Displays are amazing and will be a game changer for many photographers," said Chris McLennan, an international, award-winning adventure and travel photographer and Nikon Ambassador. "The price point will mean that everyone who is into photography—whether a full time pro or a keen enthusiast—should be looking into this product." 

The HP DreamColor Z27x is now available for $1,499, and the smaller Z24x for $599.

Add your comment Display 11 Comments.
  • 2 Hide
    Zepid , April 8, 2014 11:27 AM
    How about some actual specs and not just a copy/paste of the press release. You don't say which type/generation of IPS panel it is nor many other essential specs.
  • 2 Hide
    c123456 , April 8, 2014 11:55 AM
    Seeing as these are >$400 for the 24" monitor I don't see to many people caring. You can get a 27" 1440p AH-IPS panel for less.
  • -1 Hide
    xcoree , April 8, 2014 5:59 PM
    "Both displays provide one-button access to presets including sRGB D65, sRGB D50, Adobe RGB, BT.709, BT.2020 and DCI-P3. "

    Hmm the PR people are wrong here, you should be pulling them not printing their wrong assertions.
    to be BT.2020 compliment they need to be able to use a Frame frequency (Hz) of 120, 60, 60/1.001, 50, 30, 30/1.001, 25, 24, 24/1.001 as per the UHDTV/UHD-1 3840×2160/UHD-2 7680×4320 BT.2020 http://www.itu.int/dms_pubrec/itu-r/rec/bt/R-REC-BT.2020-0-201208-I!!PDF-E.pdf



  • -1 Hide
    ethanolson , April 8, 2014 6:12 PM
    So... there isn't the real useful info like DICOM support or gamut percentage for sRGB, AdobeRGB, etc. What gives?
  • 0 Hide
    VENAXIS , April 9, 2014 8:29 AM
    HP has never been affordable when it comes to screens, and will probably never be. I got a 27" QNIX 1440p IPS for only $300. Now that is affordable.
  • 0 Hide
    Draven35 , April 11, 2014 3:11 AM
    These are for pros who need extremely good color accuracy, not frame rate. The 24" foes 99% of Adobe RGB, and the 27" does 100% of Adobe RGB... I doubt your $300 monitor can do more than 80% of Adobe RGB. In this market segment, these HP monitors are 'affordable'. This market segment exists because a lot of cheaper monitors are not color accurate, or are not color accurate *enough* for things like film and TV effects work (and print media) and everyone's Trinitrons are dying.
  • 0 Hide
    c123456 , April 11, 2014 4:02 AM
    Draven35: Here's a 24" at about $440 with 99% Adobe RBG: http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/dell_u2413.htm. Your point just became irrelevant.
  • 0 Hide
    Draven35 , April 11, 2014 4:05 AM
    Nice find! note that it is a 30-bit display as well, using a 14-bit LUT... (pretty much the same as these HPs)
  • 0 Hide
    c123456 , April 11, 2014 4:15 AM
    Not really a nice find. Just took one of the several monitors I know in this performance range and googled it. This was the first of I assume many that I'm sure are far less then the HP monitor. I could've gotten lucky, but I doubt it. HP is just late to the party on this one.
  • 0 Hide
    Draven35 , April 11, 2014 4:35 AM
    Quote:
    Not really a nice find. Just took one of the several monitors I know in this performance range and googled it. This was the first of I assume many that I'm sure are far less then the HP monitor. I could've gotten lucky, but I doubt it. HP is just late to the party on this one.


    Ironic since IIRC they were first to the party...
  • 0 Hide
    c123456 , April 11, 2014 4:45 AM
    I didn't say is always late to the party... just on these particular monitors.
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