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Valve Now Charging Developers $100 to Submit to Greenlight

By - Source: Steam | B 39 comments

Those who submitted false entries on Greenlight have ruined it for everyone else.

A few days ago, Valve announced that Steam Greenlight, a community-driven effort to streamline the approval process for indie games to make it onto Steam, was finally live. The developer was probably too optimistic about Greenlight to see the hazards of hosting open submissions with relatively few stipulations. Within a matter of hours, Greenlight was flooded with fake content, including the ever-elusive sequel to Half-Life 2.

In order to beat back the tide of false submissions, Valve's tweaking Steam Greenlight's policies a bit. Now, developers will have to pay a $100 fee, which Valve will donate to the charity Child's Play, in order to submit an entry onto Greenlight. Considering the costs to develop a game, $100 isn't wildly expensive for an indie developer to pay, especially when it comes with advertising to the Steam community. The fee will also deter those submitting Half-Life 3 as a joke.

It's sad to see that those who decided to abuse a useful free service have ruined it for legitimate indie developers looking to get their content onto Greenlight. $100 isn't a heavy price to pay, but it's quite a bit heftier than free.

 

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Top Comments
  • 25 Hide
    vittau , September 5, 2012 9:05 PM
    Wonderful, no more free games will be submitted now... ¬¬

    That's why we can't have good things I guess, stupid people everywhere.
  • 23 Hide
    ikefu , September 5, 2012 9:11 PM
    I'm willing to bet anyone with a good game will be able to come up with $100. Especially considering it wouldn't take hardly anything to make the money back from purchases if it was really worth submitting.
  • 15 Hide
    willard , September 5, 2012 10:06 PM
    Funny to see all the "zomg, $100 is so much" comments. $100 is...

    1) Less than the average American spends on gas each month ($177)
    2) Less than the average American family of four spends on groceries each week (around $150)
    3) Less than the average American makes during one day of work ($176)
    4) About the same as the average American spends on cable TV each month
    5) About what you'd make working a part time, minimum wage job for a week.

    $100 isn't exactly chump change or the kind of money you find in a pair of jeans you haven't worn in a while, but it's not a massive barrier to entry either.
Other Comments
  • 25 Hide
    vittau , September 5, 2012 9:05 PM
    Wonderful, no more free games will be submitted now... ¬¬

    That's why we can't have good things I guess, stupid people everywhere.
  • 5 Hide
    booyaah , September 5, 2012 9:06 PM
    We are also accepting donations to the booyaah beer fund :) 
  • 23 Hide
    ikefu , September 5, 2012 9:11 PM
    I'm willing to bet anyone with a good game will be able to come up with $100. Especially considering it wouldn't take hardly anything to make the money back from purchases if it was really worth submitting.
  • -2 Hide
    schnitter , September 5, 2012 9:15 PM
    I'll give 200 if you get your butts working on Half Life 3.
  • -1 Hide
    Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer , September 5, 2012 9:16 PM
    I understand their argument, and I'm all for Child's Play, but they could have charged $10 and still managed to accomplish what they claim they wanted to accomplish. $100 is a lot to pay when there's a possibility that your game won't get picked.
  • 12 Hide
    vistaofdoom , September 5, 2012 9:22 PM
    Old_Fogie_Late_BloomerI understand their argument, and I'm all for Child's Play, but they could have charged $10 and still managed to accomplish what they claim they wanted to accomplish. $100 is a lot to pay when there's a possibility that your game won't get picked.

    100 dollars for advertising... yeah that's humongus.

    ps: 10 bucks is way too low
  • 13 Hide
    Darkerson , September 5, 2012 9:25 PM
    Hopefully this will curb all the idiotic submissions, like that stupid porn game, and all the other crap, like people submitting games they dont own. Its also nice they are donating the money to charity. Go Valve!
  • 12 Hide
    Johmama , September 5, 2012 9:27 PM
    Old_Fogie_Late_BloomerI understand their argument, and I'm all for Child's Play, but they could have charged $10 and still managed to accomplish what they claim they wanted to accomplish. $100 is a lot to pay when there's a possibility that your game won't get picked.

    It costs a LOT of money to develop a game. $100 is nothing when you've gone through the trouble of development. Especially for the possibility of getting it on Steam.

    On the other hand, $100 is a lot of money to make a joking submission of HL3, or a "wishful" submission of Metal Gear Solid, of which you have no rights to.
  • -4 Hide
    obsama1 , September 5, 2012 9:33 PM
    Great that they're donating the cash to charity, but the fee will deter those looking to make free games. Maybe something like $10-$25 would have been OK.
  • -6 Hide
    hotroderx , September 5, 2012 9:52 PM
    why not just put a stipulation in that anyone found to be submitting false games will be fined and taken to court.
  • 15 Hide
    willard , September 5, 2012 10:06 PM
    Funny to see all the "zomg, $100 is so much" comments. $100 is...

    1) Less than the average American spends on gas each month ($177)
    2) Less than the average American family of four spends on groceries each week (around $150)
    3) Less than the average American makes during one day of work ($176)
    4) About the same as the average American spends on cable TV each month
    5) About what you'd make working a part time, minimum wage job for a week.

    $100 isn't exactly chump change or the kind of money you find in a pair of jeans you haven't worn in a while, but it's not a massive barrier to entry either.
  • 6 Hide
    leeashton , September 5, 2012 10:07 PM
    HotRoderxwhy not just put a stipulation in that anyone found to be submitting false games will be fined and taken to court.

    because believe it or not there are other country's outside the US, i mean come on you can't even extradite the owner of megaupload!
  • 1 Hide
    dalethepcman , September 5, 2012 10:11 PM
    HotRoderxwhy not just put a stipulation in that anyone found to be submitting false games will be fined and taken to court.


    Because you have to prove damages in court, and how do you damage something that's free?

    Why not just charge people to submit their games to keep the super intelligent people like you from posting fart app's...
  • 3 Hide
    cybrcatter , September 5, 2012 10:16 PM
    So many poor folks ITT.
  • 6 Hide
    A Bad Day , September 5, 2012 10:16 PM
    It takes a couple of bad apples to ruin it for everyone else.
  • 5 Hide
    illo , September 5, 2012 10:44 PM
    jalekEven Apple doesn't charge that much.



    apple charges the exact same thing?
  • 4 Hide
    PlusOne , September 5, 2012 10:56 PM
    I imagine "Seduce Me" didn't help this cause, either (despite the legitimacy of that game).

    The price is simultaneously quite a bit and not very much. If you are already developing an indie game for the public, this is a small hurdle that you can probably overcome. But knowing that you will have to pay $100 to put it up may deter your neighborhood geek from deciding to make a cool game for Steam. So paradoxically, the price is too high and too low.

    But here's an idea: make it a requirement to submit a functional demo of the game. Legitimate developers would be able to produce this with ease, whereas pranksters would have to submit a fake demo, which the community would frown upon and downvote. Seems fair to me, but Greenlight is still foreign to me.
  • 3 Hide
    badaxe2 , September 5, 2012 11:05 PM
    $100 sounds like just the right price. On one hand, it's enough to discourage all the idiots from flooding the service with garbage, and on the other, anyone seriously committed to their work should be able to spring it.
  • 0 Hide
    kcorp2003 , September 5, 2012 11:05 PM
    i hope they don't start charging customer a fee.
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