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Haswell CPUs to Top Out at 3.5 GHz

By - Source: VR-Zone | B 73 comments

The lineup of Intel's Haswell processors, due for launch in Q2 2013, has been leaked.

Chinese website VR-Zone published the spec sheet, which includes 14 different Core i-4000 series processors, ranging from the Core i5-4430S (2.7 GHz) to the flagship i7-477K (3.5 GHz) model.

Thirteen models are quad-core models, and five versions (all i7 models) support hyperthreading. The fourth-generation of i-processors will be based on the LGA1150 package, which will require those who upgrade from sandy Bridge or Ivy Bridge CPUs to buy new motherboards.

Most interestingly, Intel is lifting the power budget of the processors from a maximum of 77 watts in the current generation to 84 watts at the top end, while the mainstream processors remain at their old 65, 45 and 35 watt power ranges. It is reasonable to assume that the 84 watt rating of i7-4770/4770K processor is based on increased graphics performance of these chips.

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Top Comments
  • 27 Hide
    lengcaifai , December 12, 2012 1:20 PM
    subtract 5 pins... = new motherboard please, thanks
  • 23 Hide
    Onikage , December 12, 2012 1:11 PM
    nope.. gonna stay with my 2700K 4.5Ghz till 14 nm Broadwell.... thank you.
  • 22 Hide
    dgingeri , December 12, 2012 1:20 PM
    and they're still deactivating VT-d on the unlocked chips. That's annoying. I'll stick with my 2600k for a while longer. It OCs to 4.6GHz easily. Why bother to upgrade?
Other Comments
  • 6 Hide
    mad tech , December 12, 2012 1:09 PM
    Release it already i am w8ing to upgrade from crappy core2duo
  • 23 Hide
    Onikage , December 12, 2012 1:11 PM
    nope.. gonna stay with my 2700K 4.5Ghz till 14 nm Broadwell.... thank you.
  • 12 Hide
    Anonymous , December 12, 2012 1:12 PM
    Does anyone know what are the improvements?
    I dont see major improvements except for the igp.
  • 22 Hide
    dgingeri , December 12, 2012 1:20 PM
    and they're still deactivating VT-d on the unlocked chips. That's annoying. I'll stick with my 2600k for a while longer. It OCs to 4.6GHz easily. Why bother to upgrade?
  • 27 Hide
    lengcaifai , December 12, 2012 1:20 PM
    subtract 5 pins... = new motherboard please, thanks
  • -9 Hide
    zrobbb , December 12, 2012 1:27 PM
    ... So excited!
  • -7 Hide
    alchemy69 , December 12, 2012 1:31 PM
    Do we really need that much choice? What's wrong with 'High End', 'Mainstream' and 'Budget'?
  • 16 Hide
    getochkn , December 12, 2012 1:32 PM
    LAME. New motherboard again. I wish both AMD and Intel could come up with something to work for a few generations anyways.
  • 9 Hide
    ojas , December 12, 2012 1:36 PM
    Very interesting! Higher TDPs on all the standard desktop parts and a 35w quad core with HT at the other end!

    Also, ALL models get the same IGP with almost the same clocks, so no Wolfgang, i don't think the increased TDP is because of the IGP, unless there's more to it than what's written here.

    I wonder if this will allow the processors to be clocked higher, or if it simply means that they're dissipating more heat via the IHS more quickly. I'd expect power consumption to remain identical to Ivy with the IGP turned off, infact lower, since i remember Otellini saying something like "twice as efficient during idle vs Sandy Bridge" with regard to Haswell's performance.

    Didn't expect higher clocks really, it's the same process after all.

    mad techRelease it already i am w8ing to upgrade from crappy core2duo

    Yeah me too! Though it's quad in my case.

    Onikagenope.. gonna stay with my 2700K 4.5Ghz till 14 nm Broadwell.... thank you.

    Yeah doubt there's much for people who're on Sandy/Ivy at the moment...

    ThiemoDoes anyone know what are the improvements?I dont see major improvements except for the igp.

    Read:
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6355/intels-haswell-architecture

    dgingeriand they're still deactivating VT-d on the unlocked chips. That's annoying. I'll stick with my 2600k for a while longer. It OCs to 4.6GHz easily. Why bother to upgrade?

    Isn't that true for the existing -K series chips as well? (EDIT: it is true, just checked).

    EDIT:
    More observations regarding the TDP: Some of the the low power CPUs clock as high as the 84w ones on turbo boost, and the only dual core i5 there is (35w, second last in the list) has a minimum of 2.9 GHz (Will pentiums and i3s run at 3.5+???? Or will they all be 35w parts?).

    So what's the catch here? the IGP isn't the cause as far as i can tell, unless there are grades of the HD 4600 graphics (like HD4650 or something), but that's unlikely looking at how they've named their IGPs so far. Clearly the lower TDP CPUs (or APUs, really) are indicative of what Haswell is really capable of as far as power consumption and heat are concerned.

    What i think is, the standard desktop parts will be able to remain in their turbo state for longer and OC higher than SB/IB could, same goes for the IGP in those parts.
  • -8 Hide
    Lord Captivus , December 12, 2012 1:41 PM
    Stop it with the graphics in CPUs!!
  • 9 Hide
    Sakkura , December 12, 2012 1:45 PM
    Still only official support up to DDR3-1600? I'm a little surprised by that. Oh well, doesn't really matter as long as you pay attention when you buy the motherboard.
  • 13 Hide
    cknobman , December 12, 2012 1:55 PM
    Intel your new socket just guaranteed I wont be giving you any business for at least 3 more years since I just bought an I7 3770k and dont want to replace my motherboard anytime soon.
  • 14 Hide
    Onus , December 12, 2012 2:02 PM
    I bought high-end mobos for my last two builds. That has done wonders for the upgrade itch; there's just no need. These new chips won't allow me to do anything I'm not already doing now.
    If you're on S775 or maybe S1156, then probably the performance difference is worthwhile. Look at your rig, and ask yourself if an upgrade would make it better for you, or would it just transfer your money to some vendors? What can't you run [well enough] now, that an upgrade would fix? If the answer is "Nothing," then save your money. Step outside the incessant churn of planned obsolescence / perceived obsolescence.
  • 18 Hide
    Pherule , December 12, 2012 2:03 PM
    No 6/8 cores? Useless. I'm glad I bought Sandy Bridge when I did, because clearly progress has slowed. I'll take another look at the market if/when Intel finally wakes up and starts on 10+ core desktop CPUs.
  • 2 Hide
    twelve25 , December 12, 2012 2:05 PM
    I predict minor improvements at best.
  • 9 Hide
    keither5150 , December 12, 2012 2:15 PM
    I have a 6 year old i7 920 and a newer 2600k machine. Both have dual 6950's. I see no noticeable difference in gaming. My buddy has a newer 3750.... I think. He also has dual 6950's. I don't see that his machine does anything faster than mine.

    I think that my 920 will last a long time...... I did add a high end SSD to it lately.
  • 5 Hide
    Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer , December 12, 2012 2:16 PM
    dgingeriand they're still deactivating VT-d on the unlocked chips. That's annoying. I'll stick with my 2600k for a while longer. It OCs to 4.6GHz easily. Why bother to upgrade?

    It is annoying, since I'm sure it's a wholly artificial limitation. I'm sure they do it so that you won't just buy the top i7, overclock it, and use it in a server or other high-end rig in place of a more expensive Xeon or "Extreme" processor. :sarcastic: 
  • -2 Hide
    mousseng , December 12, 2012 2:17 PM
    PheruleNo 6/8 cores? Useless. I'm glad I bought Sandy Bridge when I did, because clearly progress has slowed. I'll take another look at the market if/when Intel finally wakes up and starts on 10+ core desktop CPUs.

    Why? Those extra cores won't benefit you unless you're doing heavily-threaded work (video rendering, image manipulation, 3D modeling, etc). I'd rather have fewer stronger cores, as that'd be more universally helpful since most programs can't leverage that many threads.

    Also, the higher TDP has me at a loss as well - are they having more heat issues?
  • 9 Hide
    hrmes , December 12, 2012 2:25 PM
    It's been 6 years since quad core CPUs were introduced and we are still stuck with 4 cores as the 6-core i7 CPUs are too expensive for most people, and 8-cores are still only targeted for servers.
    Intel could have already given us affordable 8-core CPUs if they had a version without integrated graphics.
    Too bad...
  • -3 Hide
    makaveli316 , December 12, 2012 2:36 PM
    Few months ago i upgraded my cpu - i5 3570K. I'll keep it for at least 2 more years. I doubt people with Ivy Bridge will upgrade to Haswell. If you're coming from a 920 or even older, it's a must though. Of course if you're planning an upgrade...
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