Intel Releases Itanium 9500 Poulson Manual

First spotted by the folks over at CPU World, the document provides detailed information about the 32 nm, 3.1 billion transistor CPUs.

According to the 512-page manual, there will be four eight-core versions of Poulson, the 9520, 9540, 9550 and 9560 models. The chip will replace the Tukwila-based Itanium 9300 quad-core series that was introduced in February 2010 and is manufactured in 65 nm. The die size will be 544 mm2, which is considerably smaller than the 699 mm2 of its predecessor.

Among the new features of the processor is Intel's Instruction Replay Technology, which allows the CPU to recover from pipeline errors much faster as the execution does not rely on an entire pipeline flush, but simply restarts at the last known correct position.

The document also provides information about dual domain (front-end/back-end) hyper-threading, which makes its debut with Poulson. According to the manufacturer, the expanded hyper-threading approach, which will still allow two threads per physical processor, and the decoupled pipeline enable instruction fetch and instruction execution to operate independently and run much more efficiently: For example, the front-end can perform instruction fetch for either thread regardless of which thread the back-end is executing.

Intel was originally expected to launch Poulson sometime in Q2 of 2012.

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  • fancarolina
    "First spotted by the folks over at CPU World, the document provides detailed information about the 32 nm, 3.1 billion processor CPUs."

    Processor ... I'm pretty sure that should be transistor.
    13
  • Other Comments
  • fancarolina
    "First spotted by the folks over at CPU World, the document provides detailed information about the 32 nm, 3.1 billion processor CPUs."

    Processor ... I'm pretty sure that should be transistor.
    13
  • palladin9479
    Itanium is low priority for development funds, it tends to be one to two years behind Intel's desktop offerings. And honestly I don't blame them, HP is the only one developing systems for Itaniums. Itanium doesn't compete with AMD it competes with IBM, Oracle (Sun) and their like in the HPC and enterprise world. These are specialized systems running very specific tasks with high cost software, Itanium's VLIW ISA just gets tore up. VLIW is bad design for a general purpose main CPU, good design for a DSP and GPU though.
    5
  • teodoreh
    When Google started their business, they used... Celeron processors in order to achieve their goals. Anyone using exotic processors, just wastes his money nowadays..
    -10