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Intel: Core i5 'Lynnfield' Still on Track for 2H'09

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 38 comments

Intel still giving itself a six-month window for release of Lynnfield.

We know that Intel’s going to be bringing out a more mainstream iteration of its Nehalem technology, popularly known right now as Core i5.

Amidst reports that Intel was delaying “Lynnfield” processors and chipsets from July to September, we asked Intel for the official story.

Expectedly, Intel didn’t offer any hard dates and stood its ground that things are progressing still as projected.

“We have always said 2nd half 2009 for production for Lynnfield,” an Intel representative told Tom’s Hardware.

The talk surrounding Core i5’s timing started from a Digitimes report saying that processors and P55-based chipsets were pushed back by a couple months. The report also went on to list three Core i5 CPUs for launch: “with frequencies of 2.93 GHz, 2.8 GHz and 2.66 GHz and priced at US$562, US$284 and US$196 in thousand-unit tray quantities. All of them will feature a TDP of 95W. The P55 chipset will be priced at US$40.”

Intel offered no additional comment on the above other than to call the report just a product of “Rumour and speculation.”

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  • -4 Hide
    festerovic , May 26, 2009 10:31 PM
    "The P55 chipset will be priced at US$40.”

    Is this a typo?
  • 4 Hide
    mlcloud , May 26, 2009 10:42 PM
    Hehe, yeah, the chipset will cost $40, and for every additional PCI, SATA, and Lan slot...
  • 1 Hide
    starhoof , May 26, 2009 10:52 PM
    I wonder how much will core i5 differentiate from i7 on the benchmarks... would it worth waiting ?
  • 8 Hide
    icebain , May 26, 2009 11:16 PM
    the chipset cost is just that, the chipset. Not actual retail boards.
  • 1 Hide
    anamaniac , May 26, 2009 11:21 PM
    I am also curious as to whether or not these will have any improvements over the i7.

    The i7 has proven to be the most clock efficient, and overclocks like a champ.
    The cheapest i7 is $280 right now, and I personally want it. Will we have any reason other than price alone to get an i5?
    I'm personally hoping it can exploit the benefits of ddr3 better and have even better clock efficiency.
  • 0 Hide
    Pigbearman , May 26, 2009 11:42 PM
    How many processor cores will the i5 have? Is it still a quad core but smaller? Tri-core? Dual? what?
  • 0 Hide
    freiheitner , May 26, 2009 11:42 PM
    Can someone tell me what the Core i5 is? I thought i7 was the "more mainstream" product (Xeon being the top-end). What makes i5 different from i7? How is $500+ "more mainstream"?
  • 0 Hide
    freiheitner , May 26, 2009 11:43 PM
    freiheitnerCan someone tell me what the Core i5 is? I thought i7 was the "more mainstream" product (Xeon being the top-end). What makes i5 different from i7? How is $500+ "more mainstream"?


    Sorry, meant $200+.
  • 1 Hide
    cjl , May 26, 2009 11:48 PM
    Bloomfield (i7) is high end desktop, Lynnfield is mainstream desktop, and Xeon components are meant as server/workstation CPUs.
  • 1 Hide
    Raidur , May 26, 2009 11:55 PM

    PigbearmanHow many processor cores will the i5 have? Is it still a quad core but smaller? Tri-core? Dual? what?

    I'm pretty sure i5 is going to be Quad, I could be wrong though.
  • 0 Hide
    scryer_360 , May 27, 2009 12:12 AM
    The P45 and P35 chipset runs DDR2, hasten, the P55 runs DDR3. But where as the i7 boards run triple channel memory, i5 runs dual channel.

    http://www.dailytech.com/Intel+Targets+BacktoSchool+Season+With+Core+i5+New+Chipsets/article14228.htm

    Also seems to not have full PCIe 2.0 slots, or USB 3.0 support. Aww.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , May 27, 2009 1:09 AM
    i5 is a toned down i7. Dual channel memory instead of triple channel.

    Not sure what other things they took out offhand.

    Those prices are too expensive tho.
  • 3 Hide
    krazynutz , May 27, 2009 1:26 AM
    I would loosely liken the Core i5's/Core i7's to the Pentium Dual Cores/Core 2 Duo's....but in quad-core format.

    Obviously completely different chipsets and memory are involved but I'm talking about mindset.

    Is that fair?
  • 9 Hide
    mrubermonkey , May 27, 2009 3:01 AM
    I have a feeling that this idea of releasing two separate sockets for Nehalem is going to be one of Intel's biggest bad ideas since NetBurst.
  • -4 Hide
    Tindytim , May 27, 2009 3:40 AM
    mrubermonkeyI have a feeling that this idea of releasing two separate sockets for Nehalem is going to be one of Intel's biggest bad ideas since NetBurst.


    I think it's certainly an interesting idea. In a way, it allows them to give high performance features to the enthusiast crowd, without having to be as price efficient to cater to everyone. They can use P55 as the gimped, cheaper option meant for budgets, not performance.

    I can see it going either way, but the pricing of the i5's has me worried. If they perform aswell as the i7's what's the point? And the 2 most expensive i5's cost as much as the 2 least expensive i7's. What the hell is that about?
  • 0 Hide
    cloudNINE , May 27, 2009 3:59 AM
    i5 initial TDP will be 95w. Come 1st Q of 2010, new i5s will be in the 65w TDP range.

    i5 looks to be heading towards energy efficiency. Virtualization is probably at the forefront with these as well.

    Can see the day where consumer PCs have a cloud type OS (hypothetical MS OS Virtual Cloud 2)running in the background with a VPC that takes daily snapshots for easy backup and restore (remote restore?). PC vendor customer service utopia.
  • 1 Hide
    ta152h , May 27, 2009 4:06 AM
    Why are people asking what memory P55 chipset will support? It won't support DDR2 or DDR3, the processor will support DDR3 though. Chipsets don't have memory controllers anymore for the Nehalem. It's dual channel though, instead of having three channels, which will lower transfer rates, but should also lower latency a little, since dual channel setups have lower latency on the i7.

    Probably it will use a little less power, for both the processor and the chipset, so it could be a very appealing platform.
  • -1 Hide
    jaragon13 , May 27, 2009 4:34 AM
    Meh, I don't care whether it's dual channel, I really care more about the actual features and how much speed it truly gives overall. The fact it'll be priced with mobos about ~100 dollars cheaper, and a starting CPU about 80 dollars lower, this might actually be a good Phenom II buster ( provided the performance is all solid )
    PCI-E 3.0, honestly, I have never heard of. Sounds like a waste to me, unless you just want to run quad SLI with GTX 395's on x4.... with little stutter. Whatever, they should have full x16 anyways.
  • 3 Hide
    vladtepes , May 27, 2009 4:47 AM
    Not interested, I will stick with my C2Duos 'till next generation. I have top GPUS and that's all I care about. 562 US$ for a freakin CPU? What's this, the 90's?
  • -4 Hide
    davidgbailey , May 27, 2009 4:53 AM
    It's so obvious.....5 is a lower number than 7.....if you're going to wait for something wait for an 8 core cpu from intel and not a core i5. Personally, I think you should wait for the new 128bit CPU's that will be arriving shortly.
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