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Intel Phases Out Remaining Nehalem Processors

By - Source: Intel | B 31 comments

Intel notified its partners that it will soon discontinue the i7-740QM and i7-840QM processors.

Both quad-core CPUs use the 45 nm Clarksfield core of the Nehalem micro architecture, and were originally launched in June of 2010.

According to a product change notification, the processors have a last order date of November 9, 2012 and will ship until supplies are depleted. Both mobile CPUs use the Socket G1, are rated at 45 watts TDP and support DDR3-1333 memory. The 740QM runs at 1.73 GHz and the 840QM at 1.87 GHz.

To make room for Ivy Bridge, Intel had removed both processors some time ago from the official pricing sheet, which does not list any 45 nm notebook desktop and notebook processors anymore, aside from Atom chips and the Celeron T3500.

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  • 22 Hide
    vilenjan , May 14, 2012 4:27 PM
    Why? Ivy's are still overall better than SBs, an SB already had no competition. There is 0 incentive. Welcome back to the cpu monopoly.
  • 21 Hide
    tomsreader , May 14, 2012 4:17 PM
    here's an idea, phase out the currently hot ivb and release the cool version of it...
  • 20 Hide
    phamhlam , May 14, 2012 4:43 PM
    tomsreaderhere's an idea, phase out the currently hot ivb and release the cool version of it...


    It is only hot if you overclock it. Ivy Bridge is good. It might not be as great as SB one year ago. Ivy Bridge is great for laptops and tablets. Next year Haswell chip will be great for desktop since it is a tock.
Other Comments
  • 21 Hide
    tomsreader , May 14, 2012 4:17 PM
    here's an idea, phase out the currently hot ivb and release the cool version of it...
  • 22 Hide
    vilenjan , May 14, 2012 4:27 PM
    Why? Ivy's are still overall better than SBs, an SB already had no competition. There is 0 incentive. Welcome back to the cpu monopoly.
  • 19 Hide
    halcyon , May 14, 2012 4:31 PM
    Goodbye Nehalem. May you rest in peace.
  • -6 Hide
    Netherscourge , May 14, 2012 4:39 PM
    Why discontinue a perfectly awesome CPU line?

    I'm not upgrading to Ivy Bridge. There's no reason to.

    Intel needs to acknowledge that some people don't want to upgrade their CPU or MOBOs every year.

    I'm on a 4-year cycle myself. I went from an Athlon X2 64 4400 to a Core i7 two years ago. BF3 runs perfectly on it and I'm not upgrading until maybe Unreal 4 games start coming out.
  • 20 Hide
    phamhlam , May 14, 2012 4:43 PM
    tomsreaderhere's an idea, phase out the currently hot ivb and release the cool version of it...


    It is only hot if you overclock it. Ivy Bridge is good. It might not be as great as SB one year ago. Ivy Bridge is great for laptops and tablets. Next year Haswell chip will be great for desktop since it is a tock.
  • -9 Hide
    jdamon113 , May 14, 2012 4:44 PM
    https://www.google.com/#hl=en&gs_nf=1&tok=KOhHMhH7Qy_3KjNbpAxdQg&cp=17&gs_id=1e&xhr=t&q=homer+simpson+boring&pf=p&sclient=psy-ab&oq=homer+simpson+bor&aq=0&aqi=g4&aql=&gs_l=&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=37269601f7eabbc0&biw=1411&bih=858
  • -8 Hide
    jdamon113 , May 14, 2012 4:45 PM
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pKv8SCoobE
  • 12 Hide
    stevelord , May 14, 2012 4:59 PM
    My father is getting IB. But he is also coming from a Phenom X6. Should see a substantial improvement there. ;) 

    /agree with SB being so good and having no competition. But IB seems that it might be a lot better off in the mobile market.
  • 1 Hide
    SteelCity1981 , May 14, 2012 5:13 PM
    I thought intel already did phase out Nehalem a while ago, but i guess not. Sandy Bridge prob next year at some time to too will hear that Intel will be phasing it out as well it's just a processors lifecycle. Though Nehalem brought some pretty big changes to Intel processors like an intergrated memory controller a unified quad core design on a single chip and L3 shared chace still used today in the current intel cpus. Nehalem was a great chip for its time and still is a pretty solid chip that can perform just about anything you throw at it to this day.
  • 12 Hide
    LukeCWM , May 14, 2012 5:13 PM
    NetherscourgeWhy discontinue a perfectly awesome CPU line?I'm not upgrading to Ivy Bridge. There's no reason to.Intel needs to acknowledge that some people don't want to upgrade their CPU or MOBOs every year.


    I don't buy a new CPU every year, not even close. Yet I have nothing wrong with them improving year after year so I get the most bang for my buck when I do upgrade.

    Also, Ivy Bridge doesn't require a motherboard update.
  • 1 Hide
    gibs0 , May 14, 2012 5:19 PM
    NetherscourgeWhy discontinue a perfectly awesome CPU line?I'm not upgrading to Ivy Bridge. There's no reason to.


    I came from a Core i7-920 to a Core i7-3770K just last week. Had been running the 920 since the day it came out. Definitely a beast of a CPU and I don't plan on getting rid of it any time soon. It'll serve me well in a backup machine.
  • 1 Hide
    jacobdrj , May 14, 2012 5:22 PM
    Still chugging along on an ole' Q6600...

    My pappy is plenty satisfied chugging along on his ole' Q8200...

    Just bought a brand new A8 based Laptop...

    Its all about the SSDs...

    As a consumer (i.e. someone who does not use their system for content creation) once Quad Core processors and SSDs both became affordable, and once Windows 7 came out, the average consumer has switched from a 'IT' upgrade model of 'replacing all systems every 18 to 36 months', to an 'Automotive' cycle of 'replace it when it breaks'.

    Games are designed to work for the lowest common denominator to appeal to as many potential buyers as possible, and online content is still quite usable so long as you have 4 cores. When you have 4 cores and an SSD, you don't worry about having antivirus software running and killing performance in the background.

    As a side note: The 1st generation Intel i-series chips were very underwhelming to me. Not until Sandy Bridge did I see palpable performance gains on content consumption, and further, only the balance afforded by both the new Ivy Bridge and AMD's Llano make any sense for the average consumer, with the former being more than twice as expensive...

    I can't see myself recommending anything but APUs for the average content consumer for the foreseeable future...

  • 10 Hide
    halcyon , May 14, 2012 5:32 PM
    NetherscourgeIntel needs to acknowledge that some people don't want to upgrade their CPU or MOBOs every year.

    ...and just how would you have Intel acknowledge this? Also, many enthusiasts do upgrade annually (if not more often). I'd imagine those enthusiasts are glad that Intel keeps vectoring new CPUs towards us.
  • 5 Hide
    gibs0 , May 14, 2012 5:32 PM
    tomsreaderhere's an idea, phase out the currently hot ivb and release the cool version of it...


    I don't see what the fuss is about with Ivy Bridge being too hot. With a Corsair H100, my 3770K idles at 18c and maxes out at full load in the mid 30s. That's a lot better than any other modern, high-end Intel CPU I have used with liquid cooling.
  • 4 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , May 14, 2012 5:42 PM
    Haswell will be knockin' on my door next year.
  • 2 Hide
    xtreme5 , May 14, 2012 5:51 PM
    the former nehalem did a great job GOOD BYE!
  • 10 Hide
    Anonymous , May 14, 2012 5:51 PM
    LOL, why don't people ever read. These are MOBILE parts, not desktop parts. You aren't upgrading your laptop anyway outside of adding new memory or a new hard drive. You certainly aren't doing CPU upgrades on your laptop. As for IvyBridge, it is WAY faster than old school Nahelem. Look at the mobile IvyBridge review out today from Toms. It is quite a compelling processor. SandyBridge is probably out in a year as well as Haswell and Ivy will be the CPUs of choice on the Intel side.
  • 0 Hide
    yumri , May 14, 2012 6:29 PM
    to me Ivy Bridge gen 1 was mainly aimed at low power consumption and thusly the mobile market so it isn't that much of a performance increase as all the reviewers said and even Intel said prior to its launch as this is a "tick" in their release pattern not a "tock" thus the performance isn't the main focus in Ivy Bridge but the size of the die.
    Agreeing with jacobdrj up above that if you already have a quad core CPU and a SSD then it will not make sense to upgrade until there is something which actually uses that kind of computing power in the avg consumer market though everything which i see coming out are console ports which is a few generations behind any desktop aimed games for video games.
    To disagree with jocobdrj there is a major reason to upgrade from a Q6600 to a more morden CPU if you are doing video/audio editing, content creation, playing lag sensetive video games, data manipulation, compileing of programs, and/or any other computing heavy task.
    People actually do do programming on laptops so the point for the disagree is valid but the compileing is most likely sent to a stand alone sever and/or a clustered sever/sever farm with the compiled version sent back to the cleint on the laptop so the laptop only has to be able to run the program not render and/or compile massive amounts of data unless the user is stupid and didn't realize that a laptop isn't built for rendering and/or compiling programs and tried to do that as those are applications for desktops, workstations and severs.
    My personal opinion is why did Intel take so long to stop making these parts as 45nm is a kinda old manufacturing process even though the static ram for L1 and L2 cache is still in 90nm manufacturing basicly becuase cross talk and modifing L1 and L2 cache die size doesnt make as big of head lines as modifing core die size even though making the static ram size smaller will speed up both the physical and the virtual core speeds on the Intel CPUs.
    Thus i will like to see Intel work not on the core die size for now but on the L1 and L2 manufacturing processes so they can put more of the other parts into the CPU thus having a faster CPU then before if they just shink the L1 and L2 manufacturing process if prosiable which i hope it is but it probably will require moveing around where it is and also using that 3D design to prevent cross talk with the L1 and L2 cache so they could shink it it would also take up less power if they did shink it
  • 0 Hide
    SteelCity1981 , May 14, 2012 6:45 PM
    The thing is you get what you need not what's out there because if you get something you don't need that would be like buying a super car and never going past the 70mph speed limit. Sure it's nice and flashy, but if you aren't ever going to use it fully for it's intended prupose then you just wasted your money.
  • 5 Hide
    egmccann , May 14, 2012 6:56 PM
    jacobdrjStill chugging along on an ole' Q6600...My pappy is plenty satisfied chugging along on his ole' Q8200...Just bought a brand new A8 based Laptop...Its all about the SSDs...As a consumer (i.e. someone who does not use their system for content creation) once Quad Core processors and SSDs both became affordable, and once Windows 7 came out, the average consumer has switched from a 'IT' upgrade model of 'replacing all systems every 18 to 36 months', to an 'Automotive' cycle of 'replace it when it breaks'.


    Switching to it?

    In my experience - gamers aisde, who end up upgrading components on a faster cycle, typically - consumers (not businesses) upgrade "when it breaks" (or "when things finally won't run") now. I run into single-core, sub-1 Gb RAM machines running (or trying to ) XP all the time. Why are they still using it even though you can get a $300-400 desktop that'd blow it away? "It still works" for web browsing/email/etc.

    For most consumers, they treat PCs not like business components but like appliances. They bought their toaster or microwave 10 years ago and it works, when it breaks, they'll throw it out. Same with their PC.
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