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Intel Unlocked Anniversary Pentium CPU Available Soon

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 25 comments

Soon we'll be seeing a new unlocked Pentium processor from Intel.

It's not the first time we've seen information about the Intel Pentium Anniversary Edition processor, but now Intel is revealing a number of the missing details, namely the official technical specifications for the unlocked Pentium processor. And yes, by unlocked we mean that the multiplier is unlocked.

The chip is clocked in at a base frequency of about 3.2 GHz and comes packed with two cores. It drops into the LGA1150 socket, so it should work in almost all 8-series and 9-series motherboards, and because it has an unlocked multiplier, it can be overclocked when dropped into Z87 or Z97 motherboards. The chip also has 3 MB of cache, dual-channel DDR3-1333 memory support, and comes with Intel Quick Sync Video enabled, which is a nice surprise.

Why is Intel building this processor? Quite simply, the Pentium brand has been around for 20 years now, and Intel wants to celebrate, but the company probably also sees an opportunity to explore a segment of the market that might be interested in an unlocked $80 CPU. We're curious, too.


All in all, this chip should be a nifty little overclocker. Its exact purpose in the market remains questionable, though it will be a nice learning platform for overclocking. It probably won't be too expensive, and it looks like certain manufacturers are building budget-oriented Z97-based motherboards to accompany the launch.

Pricing is expected to sit around $80 per chip. They are set to hit shelves this month for those of you who are aching to learn to overclock an Intel chip without dropping hundreds on an unlocked Core i5 or Core i7 processor, nor want to use a possibly faulty secondhand chip.

Follow Niels Broekhuijsen @NBroekhuijsen. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

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Top Comments
  • 15 Hide
    derekullo , June 3, 2014 11:18 AM
    Still waiting on the 10 gigahertz single core Intel promised me in the 90s.
  • 14 Hide
    bemused_fred , June 3, 2014 1:33 AM
    Quote:
    All you have to do is tag your item with any keyword like "Premium" "Elite" "Advanced" "Unlocked" etc etc

    And people go nuts over the thing...



    I see you clearly don't know what "unlocked" means in this context.....
  • 11 Hide
    iam2thecrowe , June 3, 2014 3:09 AM
    an unlocked i3 with HT would be nicer, but then of course they'd sell less i5's.
Other Comments
  • 14 Hide
    bemused_fred , June 3, 2014 1:33 AM
    Quote:
    All you have to do is tag your item with any keyword like "Premium" "Elite" "Advanced" "Unlocked" etc etc

    And people go nuts over the thing...



    I see you clearly don't know what "unlocked" means in this context.....
  • 5 Hide
    chaosmassive , June 3, 2014 2:57 AM
    second processor with unlocked multiplier after E6500K, its been awhile isnt?
  • 11 Hide
    iam2thecrowe , June 3, 2014 3:09 AM
    an unlocked i3 with HT would be nicer, but then of course they'd sell less i5's.
  • 1 Hide
    Au_equus , June 3, 2014 5:17 AM
    Are they going include the new TIM between the die and the IHS supposedly going to present in devil's canyon? or is it the old stuff used in IB and Haswell that plagues OCs?
  • 0 Hide
    spookyman , June 3, 2014 7:42 AM
    might make a cheap gaming system for someone
  • 4 Hide
    rwpritchett , June 3, 2014 7:46 AM
    This would be a very interesting chip to use in the next SBM low end build. The value after OC should be exceptional.
  • 3 Hide
    zhunt99 , June 3, 2014 7:54 AM
    I feel it would have been interesting if they made it a triple core.
  • 1 Hide
    Amdlova , June 3, 2014 7:59 AM
    i will get that processor. will fit on my game needs... i don't need a i5 or i7 to play the games what i still playing. and i3 still very expensive. o prefer get an amd cpu for the 130 us
  • 4 Hide
    InvalidError , June 3, 2014 9:08 AM
    An overclockable 2C2T CPU at a time where OSes running applications and games often have enough threads flying around in the background to give 2C4T and 4C4T CPUs somewhat of a workout... might be a little late.

    If Intel had really wanted to make their 20th Anniversary edition Pentiums super-special by making them at least somewhat relevant in the enthusiast market like they were 15-20 years ago, they should have enabled HT and sold them in the $120-150 range.
  • 4 Hide
    Lightbulbie , June 3, 2014 9:25 AM
    Quote:
    An overclockable 2C2T CPU at a time where OSes running applications and games often have enough threads flying around in the background to give 2C4T and 4C4T CPUs somewhat of a workout... might be a little late.

    If Intel had really wanted to make their 20th Anniversary edition Pentiums super-special by making them at least somewhat relevant in the enthusiast market like they were 15-20 years ago, they should have enabled HT and sold them in the $120-150 range.

    Or, y'know. An i3. (Dual-core with HT)
  • 6 Hide
    InvalidError , June 3, 2014 9:36 AM
    Quote:
    Or, y'know. An i3. (Dual-core with HT)

    Releasing a special edition i3 to celebrate 20 years of Pentium would not sound right.

    Breaking the branding convention by releasing a Pentium-branded unlocked i3 on the other hand would would be something super-special and far more useful in today's market.
  • 0 Hide
    Pherule , June 3, 2014 10:06 AM
    No mention of whether it will use the good or the crap heat material. No point in getting something like this for overclocking if it has bad heat material, you might as well just get an i3 in that case.
  • 0 Hide
    mapesdhs , June 3, 2014 10:27 AM

    Some tasks are still limited to 1 or 2 threads, such as ProE, in which case a Z97
    based on this chip could be rather good, eg. I observed very decent ProE results
    with an i3 550 @ 4.7GHz. Beyond such specific examples though, I don't know...

    Ian.

  • 1 Hide
    Chris Droste , June 3, 2014 10:58 AM
    all i can say is the heat spread better be soldered on there good. Hopefully something reaching 5GHZ on air and under 80W thermal....?
  • 3 Hide
    lp231 , June 3, 2014 11:15 AM
    I'm going to get it, just for the heck of it.
  • 15 Hide
    derekullo , June 3, 2014 11:18 AM
    Still waiting on the 10 gigahertz single core Intel promised me in the 90s.
  • 4 Hide
    InvalidError , June 3, 2014 11:38 AM
    Quote:
    No mention of whether it will use the good or the crap heat material.

    The "crap" material Intel uses is actually better than most of the best aftermarket crap you can put in its place.

    The problem is there is somewhere in the neighborhood of 100-200 micrometers worth of it between the IHS and the die itself, which is a huge gap. If you put a 200 microns thick layer of your favorite "best" aftermarket paste, it would fare horribly too.

    200 microns is no big deal for solder-based TIM but with pastes, it can ruin your day.
  • 0 Hide
    rwpritchett , June 3, 2014 12:30 PM
    Quote:
    all i can say is the heat spread better be soldered on there good. Hopefully something reaching 5GHZ on air and under 80W thermal....?

    Something this cheap is just begging for a delid and Coollaboratory Liquid Ultra if it uses the same design as the other Haswells. My 4770K dropped almost 20°C with CLU under the IHS.
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