Kindle Fire HDX Teardown

Introduced at the end of last month, the brand new Kindle Fire HDX is available in two sizes: 7 inches and 8.9 inches. Both of these sport storage capacities of 16 GB, 32 GB and 64 GB, and the teardown team at iFixit just tore into the 16 GB 7-inch model. iFixit reports that this Kindle scored the lowest of any Kindle ever on its repairability scale.

 

What did they find inside (once they finally managed to get in)? A Snapdragon 800 SoC with a quad-core CPU clocked to 2.2 GHz, 2 GB of Samsung K3QF2F200B LPDDR3 SDRAM, 16 GB of Toshiba THGMAG7A2JBAIR eMMC NAND Flash, a Synaptics S7301B Touchscreen Controller, a Qualcomm WCD9320 Audio Codec, a Qualcomm PM8941 Power Management IC, and a Summit Microelectronics SMB349 Lithium-Ion/Lithium-Polymer Battery Charger.

As far as getting inside the tablet is concerned, iFixit mentioned powerful adhesive gluing down the battery, while the LCD and digitizer cables are trapped between the LCD and mid frame (which meant removing the mid frame from the display assembly). Both of these factors contributed to the pathetic 3/10 the Kindle Fire HDX scored on the repairability scale.

Click through to iFixit for the full teardown!

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  • ubercake
    This is a pretty powerful hardware configuration for a tablet.

    Regarding the 3/10 repairability rating... I don't know how many people buy a tablet and think they're going to repair it. I've had my Acer A500 for 3.5 years. It's been dropped in addition to normal wear and it's still plugging away like day one. If it breaks, I'll probably be on amazon buying one of these Kindles. Amazon has great customer service and I'm sure they'd honor their warranty no problem.
    1
  • Grandmastersexsay
    Anonymous said:
    This is a pretty powerful hardware configuration for a tablet.

    Regarding the 3/10 repairability rating... I don't know how many people buy a tablet and think they're going to repair it. I've had my Acer A500 for 3.5 years. It's been dropped in addition to normal wear and it's still plugging away like day one. If it breaks, I'll probably be on amazon buying one of these Kindles. Amazon has great customer service and I'm sure they'd honor their warranty no problem.


    You shouldn't support products that are so locked down that you can't even change the battery.
    -2
  • stevejnb
    Anonymous said:
    Anonymous said:
    This is a pretty powerful hardware configuration for a tablet.

    Regarding the 3/10 repairability rating... I don't know how many people buy a tablet and think they're going to repair it. I've had my Acer A500 for 3.5 years. It's been dropped in addition to normal wear and it's still plugging away like day one. If it breaks, I'll probably be on amazon buying one of these Kindles. Amazon has great customer service and I'm sure they'd honor their warranty no problem.


    You shouldn't support products that are so locked down that you can't even change the battery.


    Why not? You can make a catchall of "You shouldn't support products that do X" for just about anything. End result? None of us would support anything, since I bet you'd be hard pressed to name a product that doesn't do *something* undesirable.

    This thing looks like a good little unit. Support it if you like, but know what you're getting into.
    -1