Lenovo Android Notebook Revealed in Leaked User Manual

On Thursday Lenovo was forced to acknowledge that it's working on an Android hybrid notebook after the manual (pdf) was discovered on the company's website. A representative said Lenovo had originally planned to officially announce the IdeaPad A10 this week, but the leak spoiled the surprise. Currently, pricing and actual availability are unknown.

The specs reportedly include a notebook form factor with a rotating 10.1 inch touch screen (1366 x 768) that can open up to 300 degrees, allowing the device to become a makeshift all-in-one device with the screen up front and the keyboard laying face-down in the back. This keyboard also has buttons dedicated to familiar Android functions such as "Home," "Back," "Multitask," "Settings" and a few others.

The unannounced Android notebook will also supposedly feature a quad-core Rockchip RK3188 Cortex-A9 SoC, 1 GB or 2 GB of RAM, 16 GB or 32 GB of internal storage, and a microSD card slot for up to 64 GB of extra storage. Connectivity will consist of a USB port and combo audio jack on the left side, and another USB port, microUSB port, and microHDMI port on the right.

The manual also reveals that the Android notebook will have a SIM card slot, an integrated webcam, a built-in touch pad, a built-in microphone located on the right side, and what appears to be two speakers mounted on the bottom. The home screen looks exactly as one would expect from an Android tablet, displaying the status bar and Google Search bar along the top. Another toolbar resides along the bottom with the Apps Launcher button sitting on the far left.

Over the summer there was talk that a wave of Android-based notebooks and desktops would arrive during the last quarter of 2013, as many OEMs like Dell and HP are now taking a multi-OS approach due to a declining demand for Windows-based PCs. The Slate 21 is one of HP's current Android offerings, an AIO PC with Android 4.2 "Jelly Bean" and a Nvidia Tegra 4 chip. There's also the Acer DA220HQL, a 21 inch AIO PC with a 1 GHz dual-core SoC and Android 4.0.

A Lenovo rep said that the company will announce the launch dates and pricing information for the Android-based IdeaPad A10 notebook at a later date.

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  • teh_chem
    I don't want an android notebook at the moment, but I think this sort of thing is necessary to really push android to be a better platform (note: I'm not bashing android; i use android phones and tablets, and I like google's services).

    With an android notebook, will there finally be an offline-mode for google drive/documents? And with chromebooks already established, is there really a market for android notebooks in the first place?
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  • stevejnb
    Anonymous said:
    I don't want an android notebook at the moment, but I think this sort of thing is necessary to really push android to be a better platform (note: I'm not bashing android; i use android phones and tablets, and I like google's services).

    With an android notebook, will there finally be an offline-mode for google drive/documents? And with chromebooks already established, is there really a market for android notebooks in the first place?


    My thought on this issues is... Once you add a few offline options to Android and add a few relatively minor desktop/laptop optimizations, why on Earth would you want a Chromebook ahead of the same hardware using the latest Android? Both are very resource light, both are free, but one of them has a *massive* backlog of applications available for it.

    You say Chromebooks are already established... Really? People constantly crack at what a joke Windows RT is, but, in a fraction of the time, Windows RT - which IS widely considered a joke - has established multiple times the marketshare of the Chromebook platform. My question is, why continue to support this abortion of an OS that is Chromebook rather than just tailor an Android release to make it work on a laptop style format? Its not like it would even take all that much tinkering, and it would bring *so* much more to the table than Chromebook has ever offered. Chromebook has to be the most limited OS I've ever used, and that includes Windows RT.

    Current Chromebook hardware plus an optimized Android operating system would be quite competitive with lower end laptops for functionality and probably cost less. Current Chromebooks? They're light and fast, but *boy* do you ever take a functionality hit to use one of these things. If you want to do it, and it's not e-mail, web browsing, google services, and e-mail, odds are you can't do it on a Chromebook. Conversely, if you want to do it whatever it is, Android probably has five different apps for you that will make it happen. Why the heck stick with Chromebook when Adroid is a hop, skip, and a jump away from being a solid laptop/notebook OS?

    PS - An Android notebook is a notable step in the right direction in my eyes. Scrap Chromebook, go Android.
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  • somebodyspecial
    "You say Chromebooks are already established... Really? People constantly crack at what a joke Windows RT is, but, in a fraction of the time, Windows RT - which IS widely considered a joke - has established multiple times the marketshare of the Chromebook platform."

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-07-10/google-chromebook-under-300-defies-pc-market-with-growth.html
    Chromebooks are grabbing 20-25% of the low-end notebook market despite lagging pc sales. Please provide data saying chromebooks are being outsold by Windows RT when MS is the only person making them. Dell was the last to TOTALLY DROP windows RT a few weeks ago. Nobody is planning anything for RT. It has NO market share. Microsoft took a 900mil loss for a reason. They can't sell ANY of them. RT is dead. You got your data backwards. ChromeOS is destroying RT, not the other way around.

    Just google "Amazon chromebook best selling laptop" (without quotes), and shocker, you'll find it's been a chromebook for the last 9 months...ROFL.

    I'm not saying anything good or bad about it here, just that your data is backwards. Nobody has RT flying off the shelves. Rather RT machines are ROTTING on the shelves and microsoft is taking write-downs to the tune of 900mil. It will be interesting to see how much they write-down for the new model. At least it has a T4 with more power now, but it won't sell RT either.
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