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LG's G3 to Sport Quad HD Display with 534 PPI

By - Source: Engadget | B 27 comments

LG's G2 was first announced in early August, 2013, so the company is busy working on the next generation of its flagship phone. LG has confirmed to Engadget that the G3 will feature a quad HD display with a resolution measuring 2560 x 1440 pixels.

LG's G2 was first announced in early August, 2013, so the company is busy working on the next generation of its flagship phone. LG has confirmed to Engadget that the G3 will feature a quad HD display with a resolution measuring 2560 x 1440 pixels. If rumors about a 5.5-inch panel are correct, that would equate to 534 ppi. To put that into perspective, Samsung's Galaxy S5 has 432 ppi, while the just-announced HTC One M8 features 441 ppi. The G3's display, if the reports are true, would match that of the Oppo Find 7, which also features a 5.5-inch display with a 534 PPI panel.

If this rings any bells it's because LG talked about a quad HD smartphone display back in August. The company claimed the world's first Quad HD AH-IPS LCD panel for smartphones with a resolution of 2560 x 1440 across 5.5 inches. The display in question is 1.21 mm thick with a 1.2 mm bezel. In comparison, the 5.2-inch panel on the G2 is 12 percent thicker.

There's little else in the way of information available when it comes to other specs, such as RAM, SoC, or processor. If we had to hazard a guess, we reckon the LG G3 will pack a Snapdragon 801 processor, just like the HTC One M8 and the Galaxy S5. LG will likely retain the same 2 GB of RAM that was present in the G2, though it's possible the company will bump it to 3 GB. That said, it's not like the G3 would need the extra RAM. What we'd like to see is maximum onboard storage increased from 32 GB to 64 GB. The G2 is only available in 16 GB or 32 GB flavors, and expandable storage is limited to 64 GB. At the very least, we'd like to see support for up to 128 GB via microSD. The battery in the G2 was 3000 mAh; we wouldn't be surprised if LG didn't improve on the actual size of the battery, choosing instead to focus on energy saving via software optimizations.

We imagine we'll see the G3 just ahead of the Galaxy Note 4, which is rumored for unveiling in early September. Watch this space!

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  • 10 Hide
    bison88 , April 14, 2014 7:43 PM
    Now they're just getting retarded with mobile devices. What happened to PC monitors being the cream of the crop in resolutions where it's actually necessary.

    So tired of these new age words: "cloud" and "mobile" Can't wait for it to plateau.
Other Comments
  • 0 Hide
    Mike Friesen , April 14, 2014 6:42 PM
    Quote, "The battery in the G2 was 3000 mAh; we wouldn't be surprised if LG didn't improve on the actual size of the battery, choosing instead to focus on energy saving via software optimizations."

    That would have to be some miraculous energy saving optimizations, as the screen size increased and jumped in resolution, too. If it's to have the same battery life, I'd bet on a bigger battery.
  • 4 Hide
    Shankovich , April 14, 2014 7:18 PM
    Awesome, even more pixels I can't see. Stick to a lower resolution that looks the same so that the GPU consumes less power.
  • 10 Hide
    bison88 , April 14, 2014 7:43 PM
    Now they're just getting retarded with mobile devices. What happened to PC monitors being the cream of the crop in resolutions where it's actually necessary.

    So tired of these new age words: "cloud" and "mobile" Can't wait for it to plateau.
  • 7 Hide
    kenh536 , April 14, 2014 9:21 PM
    I have a better idea. How bout give me a 1080p or even 720p screen that consumes less power and keep the bigger battery. I want battery life, not unneccesary pixels.
  • 4 Hide
    jcamel24 , April 14, 2014 11:32 PM
    I dont know how many more pixels you would need on a phone. I definitely saw a difference from the older phones to 960x540 to 1080p, but really? I'd rather have a phone battery that lasts 3 days than a 1440p screen.

    Sent from my LG G2
  • 0 Hide
    greghome , April 14, 2014 11:50 PM
    Quote:
    I have a better idea. How bout give me a 1080p or even 720p screen that consumes less power and keep the bigger battery. I want battery life, not unneccesary pixels.


    Meet the Lenovo P780 and Huawei Ascend Mate :) 
  • 0 Hide
    virtualban , April 15, 2014 12:04 AM
    Great, now give me "Surrogates" style displays... you almost got the pixel density.
  • -1 Hide
    aldaia , April 15, 2014 12:41 AM
    "the LG G3 will pack a Snapdragon 801 processor" Every new phone that I check packs a Qualcomm SoC, Wasn't this to be the year of Intel taking the market by storm?

    Ohh, wait, 2010 was already the year Intel was taking the mobile market, then 2011, then 2012, then 2013, then 2014, but I guess we will need to wait to 2015 :D 
  • 0 Hide
    Kieran Warren , April 15, 2014 1:12 AM
    Why don't LG work on bringing this technology to their monitors at a low price?
  • 1 Hide
    Blazer1985 , April 15, 2014 3:15 AM
    A nice screen for the oculus, an useless battery sucker for the smartphones.
  • 3 Hide
    Sangeet Khatri , April 15, 2014 3:29 AM
    So a complete smartphone with a 1440p screen costs nearly the same as a 1440p monitor. Wat..?!
  • 1 Hide
    Immaculate , April 15, 2014 3:43 AM
    I know its a tech battle with flagship phones but I would rather have 1080p, bigger battery, better speaker. Removable storage would be great, the new SD cards seem really fast with a high capacity.
  • 1 Hide
    Zepid , April 15, 2014 4:02 AM
    I just want a 27" 1440p AH-IPS monitor for 500 or less, with portrait/landscape rotating stand. Yet they focus all this effort on phones.
  • 1 Hide
    Jaroslav Jandek , April 15, 2014 4:34 AM
    This is really getting silly. What's next? 4k displays in 6" smartphones? Both the displays and GPUs consume extra power which is unacceptable for me in mobile devices.
    I really like what Nokia is doing with their phones. They have 4"-6" screens running 480p-720p (and one 1080p) and they look amazing, you barely see the difference in pixel density (unless you are looking for it - the only way you really notice is if you read a lot of small text).

    Quote:
    "the LG G3 will pack a Snapdragon 801 processor" Every new phone that I check packs a Qualcomm SoC, Wasn't this to be the year of Intel taking the market by storm?
    You must be confused. Intel did not really attack the smartphone segment but the tablet segment. Atom-based tablets are one of the best-selling devices on the market (ASUS T100, Dell Venue 8 Pro, ...). I'd call that success.
    Smartphone SoCs (you know, the ones with LTE/GSM/xG transceivers) just got announced recently at MWC 2014. Expecting Merrifield smartphones to immediately appear is all kinds of silly - they only have a reference phone (probably made by Asus) that is for testing only and won't make it to production and it is quite impressive performance-wise and mediocre manufacturing-wise.
  • 0 Hide
    teh_chem , April 15, 2014 5:35 AM
    So sick of these uber high PPI displays. I, on the other hand, would love for a lower PPI display (heck, I think 1080p is overkill for phones), and would rather have a longer-lasting battery because of having to push fewer pixels, plus not demanding as much processing to push those pixels. I had the Optimus G, and now the G2; I thought the Optimus G with 1280x768 was overkill at 4.7", much less the G2 with 1080p yet only half an inch longer diameter screen.
  • -1 Hide
    cknobman , April 15, 2014 6:43 AM
    I'd rather have that resolution in my 24-27 inch monitor. Right now options are slim and price is sky high. Who gives a f_ck about 4k screens on 5 inch screens?
  • 1 Hide
    aldaia , April 15, 2014 8:28 AM
    Quote:
    You must be confused. Intel did not really attack the smartphone segment but the tablet segment.


    Quote from January 11, 2010:
    "Intel Moorestown platform to drive smartphones in 2010. Look for a boost in smartphone performance and capabilities as the Intel Moorestown platform starts to appear in devices this year. Intel says that the new mobile Internet device (MID) platform will be launching during the first half of 2010, and should begin appearing in consumer devices on the market as early as the third quarter."

    Quote Jul. 2, 2010 "Intel’s Atom chips are finally ready for smartphones and we should see the fruits of Intel’s labor soon, just not this year. Instead, trade shows in early 2011 will set the stage for Intel smartphones."

    Quote 11 January 2012: "CES 2012: Intel enters the lucrative smartphone market."

    Quote 14 Jun 2013 "Intel smartphone trounces ARM in power trials. The Clover Trail+ platform is based on a 32nm Saltwell compute core. When 22nm parts based on Intel's upcoming – and more advanced – Silvermont Atom microarchitecture are slipped into the Merrifield smartphone platform later this year, Chipzilla's hand should be strengthened."

    Quote January 30, 2014 "2014 an Important Year for Intel's Smartphone Plans. The company is expected to release its Android-compatible Merrifield-based dual-core Atom chip at Mobile World Congress 2014 next month. This 22 nm platform will also include NXP's PN547 NFC component and the XMM 7160 LTE component, allowing Intel to better compete with Qualcomm."



  • -1 Hide
    Jaroslav Jandek , April 15, 2014 9:39 AM
    Quote:
    Quote from January 11, 2010: Intel Moorestown... Quote Jul. 2, 2010 "Intel’s Atom chips..."
    It did not happen. What came out of it was the Atom Z760 in 2011, which was not really noteworthy (IIRC it was used for ph/tablets). I wouldn't call it "taking the market" attempt by any measure.

    Quote:
    Quote 11 January 2012: "CES 2012: Intel enters the lucrative smartphone market... Quote 14 Jun 2013 "Intel smartphone trounces ARM in power trials. The Clover Trail+ platform is based on a 32nm Saltwell compute core..."
    The key word here is enters. And those phones are fairly successful - namely the Lenovo K800 and PMP 5430 - even know a few people that own them (these aren't the only Intel smartphones). But, they aren't meant to compete with top end ARM SoCs (even marketing says so) - it was a move to compete in power consumption, which it did.
    Intel clearly felt so strongly about "taking the market" that they used 3 years old manufacturing technology to make those SoCs (instead of the more advanced 22nm they had at that time). Sarcasm off.
    Also, there are still new devices coming based on this platform - even in 2014. Like ASUS ZenFone and ASUS PadFone.

    Quote:
    Quote January 30, 2014 ...The company is expected to release its Android-compatible Merrifield-based dual-core Atom chip at Mobile World Congress 2014 next month."
    And they did. Only now they have a SoC that is competitive with high-end ARM in performance, efficiency and price - not that it matters, it depends on the phone manufacturers to build a viable device (in late 2014 or early 2015). And this is reflected in the marketing as well. Expecting them to miraculously gain 50% market share instantly would be unreasonable, though. They are the underdog here - they have to work their way up step by step.
  • 0 Hide
    tachi1247 , April 15, 2014 11:33 AM
    is the snapdragon 801 and adreno 330 combo capable of running 2560x1440? I thought that the 805/420 combo was going to be their first chip with 4k support? That would mean that the G3 will be getting the 805 instead of the 801, which makes sense since it is coming out later than it's competitors.
  • 0 Hide
    Jaroslav Jandek , April 15, 2014 12:11 PM
    Quote:
    is the snapdragon 801 and adreno 330 combo capable of running 2560x1440?
    All S8xx SoCs can run 4k on an external display via HDMI or (for 805+) streaming.
    The on-device display, however, uses Display Serial Interface (DSI). A single-channel DSI display is only capable of 2K resolutions. S805, S808 and S810 use dual-channel DSI to allow on-device 4K resolutions (which is silly, but whatever).
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