Micron Intros the World's Smallest 128Gb NAND Flash Device

At the International Solid-State Circuits Conference taking place on February 19th, Micron is expected to present a paper on its new 128 Gb (gigabit) flash memory device which measures just 146 mm² and is currently the smallest of its kind. The device utilities the company's 20 nanometer processing technology and a triple-level-cell (TLC) that stores 3 bits of data per cell and is more than 25 per cent smaller than the company's current multi-level-cell (MLC) devices.

Glen Hawk, Vice-President of Micron's NAND Solutions Group has stated that the device would be "empowering a new class of consumer storage applications" and is primarily aimed at the removable storage market (specifically memory cards and USB flash drives) which is expected to constitute 35 percent of the NAND market in 2013. 

Micron is currently sampling the 128 Gb TLC device with "select partners" and should be available for purchase by Q2 2013 at a yet to be determined price.

 

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  • A Bad Day
    I wonder how many write cycles can the 20nm Flash take? Every Flash shrinkage usually results in reduction of max write cycles it can tolerate, requiring more wear-reduction measures.

    Though on the plus side, there's nothing wrong with SSDs being cheaper. :D
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  • A Bad Day
    I wonder how many write cycles can the 20nm Flash take? Every Flash shrinkage usually results in reduction of max write cycles it can tolerate, requiring more wear-reduction measures.

    Though on the plus side, there's nothing wrong with SSDs being cheaper. :D
    17
  • danwat1234
    Probably still over 100TB of writes but who knows
    1
  • Anonymous
    A Bad DayI wonder how many write cycles can the 20nm Flash take? Every Flash shrinkage usually results in reduction of max write cycles it can tolerate, requiring more wear-reduction measures.Though on the plus side, there's nothing wrong with SSDs being cheaper.


    Weren't there some engineers in Taiwan who were working on some solution for slowing down wear on SSD's. I think it had something to do with heating the memory after writing.
    7