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Report: Nvidia G-Sync Exclusive to Asus Until Q3 2014

By - Source: WCCF Tech | B 44 comments

Rumor has it that Nvidia will be exclusively letting Asus use its G-Sync hardware in its monitors.

If you're reading this, you've probably heard of this thing called 'the Internet.' Now this thing we call the Internet can spread information, rumors even, but not all of it may be true.

The rumor, coming from the sometimes-questionable WCCF, is that Nvidia's new G-Sync tech will be exclusive to Asus monitors until the end of Q3 2014. G-Sync is a technology that fixes screen tearing in Kepler-based games. Of course, that G-Sync is first launching on Asus monitors we already knew, but it seems that Nvidia could be sticking to Asus for its product development for a while. After that, G-Sync will be coming to other manufacturers as well, including Benq, Viewsonic, and Philips.

Considering that this is still a rumor, be sure to take it with a grain of salt. Considering that Nvidia wants G-Sync to be widely adopted, we're not sure what to believe.

Not sure what G-Sync is? Check out our article here on Nvidia G-Sync.

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Top Comments
  • 17 Hide
    wysir , November 1, 2013 6:23 AM
    Personally I don't have a problem with this as I prefer my Asus screens. On the other hand, if you want a new technology to be adopted into the tech world, you don't want to make it exclusive...
Other Comments
  • 2 Hide
    bharatwd , November 1, 2013 6:20 AM
    Actually, its the other way around......like many technologies such as physX, mantle,etc many customers have been reluctant to adopt such "exclusive technologies"..Asus are the only one to get on board the g-sync technology.....other competitors in the monitor markets want to wait out and see..if this technology really makes a significant change in the user-gaming experience.......the markets are tight and no company would want to increase the price of their monitors on g-sync unless it delivers as promised.......my guess, it will fade away......just like 3d monitors, physX.etc..........
  • 4 Hide
    rwinches , November 1, 2013 6:23 AM
    They should license this tech to everybody and advance the state of the art.
  • Display all 44 comments.
  • 17 Hide
    wysir , November 1, 2013 6:23 AM
    Personally I don't have a problem with this as I prefer my Asus screens. On the other hand, if you want a new technology to be adopted into the tech world, you don't want to make it exclusive...
  • 2 Hide
    lp231 , November 1, 2013 6:25 AM
    Physx didn't fade away. Nvidia bought Ageia and then implemented PhysX into their GPU.
  • 5 Hide
    doron , November 1, 2013 6:32 AM
    Great, if people dig this idea, there's a bigger likelihood that companies who are left behind (everyone beside nvidia and asus) might develop an alternative open standard.

    Death to proprietary.
  • -4 Hide
    Stimpack , November 1, 2013 7:24 AM
    Quote:
    They should license this tech to everybody and advance the state of the art.


    You're talking about Nvidia.
  • 0 Hide
    iMik , November 1, 2013 7:41 AM
    http://overlordforum.com/topic/603-nvidia-g-sync/page-2#entry6672
  • 9 Hide
    magicandy , November 1, 2013 7:45 AM
    There is an incorrect statement in this article:

    "G-Sync is a technology that fixes screen tearing in Kepler-based games."

    The author probably meant to say "Kepler based video cards". There are no such things as kepler-based games. Kepler is the architecture of Nvidia's current line of video cards and has nothing to do with the games themselves. This isn't something that will have to be programmed into each game; it will work with all games as it will be built into the video card itself.

    As it is, the article makes it seem like only certain games will support this, but in reality the games won't have to support it and it will regulate frame rate regardless of what you're doing.

    G-sync will work with all games on Kepler video cards (GTX 600 and 700 series), and future cards as well probably.
  • 2 Hide
    Traciatim , November 1, 2013 7:51 AM
    @Steveymoo, for performance reasons if you have v-sync on you probably want triple buffering, meaning you are always at least 25ms behind. Assuming you want vsync to avoid tearing switching to gsync solves the tearing problem, stops the judder problem on unsynched frames, and reduces your input lag by 33% . . . What's not to like?
  • 0 Hide
    Da W , November 1, 2013 8:31 AM
    Change my GPU every 2 years, ok. I can use mantle and true audio or physX if devlopper adopt it.
    Change my 3 ASUS screen that i just bought that are not compatible with G-Sync: not the same goddamn ballpark. People stick with their screens. This is gonna be hard to force adoption by the market, no mather how cool the technology is.
  • 0 Hide
    Blazer1985 , November 1, 2013 8:38 AM
    I agree with the last part of the article an most of the first comment. Beside being tired of tech that ties you to a specific hardware (being it nvidia or amd) and still being doubtful about the price they will charge for g-sync monitors.
    P.s. PhysX dedicated hardware was an unsuccesful experiment but their acquisition from nvidia meant both lots of money for ageia and widespread adoption.
  • 1 Hide
    nukemaster , November 1, 2013 9:06 AM
    Quote:
    Or, you know, you could just use vsync. Input lag is non-existent if you're already using a 120hz screen.

    Quote:
    @Steveymoo, for performance reasons if you have v-sync on you probably want triple buffering, meaning you are always at least 25ms behind. Assuming you want vsync to avoid tearing switching to gsync solves the tearing problem, stops the judder problem on unsynched frames, and reduces your input lag by 33% . . . What's not to like?

    With a card able to hold 120fps you will not get page tearing, but as soon as it drops you will fall all the way to 60fps without triple buffering.

    The idea with g-sync is that your monitor can adjust its refresh to match the video(even as the frame rate changes) card instead of the card trying to match the monitor(something that does not always go over well).This will allow the timing(since even with a 60fps frame cap a 60hz screen can page tear because the card and screen to not refresh the image at the same time) to match ALL the time even if you are at an odd ball frame rate like 50 or 90.

    I think this is GREAT, but we need an AMD and Nvidia solution.
  • 0 Hide
    DRosencraft , November 1, 2013 9:12 AM
    As nifty as an idea this may be, it is wrought with potential pitfalls. They may get away with exclusivity for a brief time because this is a technology that will be adopted slowly anyway. Restricting use to one manufacturer helps identify intrinsic flaws, rather than troubleshooting a bunch of different flavors. But it's a bit of a tall hill to climb asking people to pair their GPU to specific monitors. The opportunity for mass confusion for consumers is fairly high. Furthermore the market for this is already fairly niche (many may like the end results, but how many will be willing for the hassle and expense of achieving those ends for ultimately a limited number of games). Nvidia will have a tough time making a robust profit from this for a while. Their potential profit may come in licensing this out to AMD, Intel, and monitor manufacturers, so that this benefit becomes more universal and a simpler choice for consumers.
  • 2 Hide
    sykozis , November 1, 2013 12:02 PM
    Being exclusive to both Asus and NVidia....the adoption rate will be horrible.
  • -1 Hide
    Vladislaus , November 1, 2013 12:58 PM
    Quote:
    Or, you know, you could just use vsync. Input lag is non-existent if you're already using a 120hz screen.


    What does input lag have to do with refresh rate?
  • 1 Hide
    hapkido , November 1, 2013 1:00 PM
    Nvidia just doesn't get it. Without nearly 100% market share, their technologies aren't going to be widely used unless they make them widely available.
  • 1 Hide
    bochica , November 1, 2013 1:23 PM
    Already like ASUS monitors, so wouldn't bother me much. However, it should be expanded to a few others.

    For the people saying that V-Sync will fix their problems, you need to read up on what G-Sync does before posting.
  • 1 Hide
    Fierce Guppy , November 1, 2013 1:23 PM
    G-Sync is so much more than a "nifty" idea for FPS gamers whom get the visual tearing and stuttering but currently just have to suck-it-up. It's the sort of technology that is so beneficial that it *needs* to be rapidly adopted industry wide. A v-sync timed to the graphics card output... I mean, it's makes you wonder why it wasn't a ubiquitous component in monitor manufacturing twenty years ago.
  • 0 Hide
    BranFlake5 , November 1, 2013 3:20 PM
    To everyone saying Nvidia's proprietary software should be open, It can't. Their cards are designed specific to their software. Hardware/software harmony. Physx might be an exception but ShadowPlay, GSync, TXAA, HBAO+,Game streaming(Shield, Grid and TV) etc uses specific Nvidia architectures to support them. AMD cards don't have the required hardware on board to uses these things. Just like how Nvidia can't use the AMD audio software because Kepler cards don't have the processor.

    One other thing to consider is that consider how much more money Nvidia spends in its software department than AMD. AMD would quit researching anything because they'd rely on Nvidia's advances and make none of their own.

    Ps. Physx isn't "dying" but its still limited. More games are adopting it as time goes on.
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