Despite Six Strikes, US ISPs Disconnecting Repeat Offenders

A report published by TorrentFreak reveals that Rightscorp, a piracy monitoring firm that works with Warner Bros. and other content creators, claims that 140 Internet Service Providers (ISPs) residing in the United States have agreed to disconnect persistent file sharers.  

Wait! Aren't ISPs already participating in the Copyright Alert System? Don't file sharers get at least six strikes (warnings) before ISPs even think about disconnection? Throttling after repeated warning letters is usually the punishment, although the outcome depends on the ISP.

According to the report, Rightscorp continuously monitors BitTorrent networks to see who is sharing what. The company then approaches these file sharers by contacting their ISP, who in turn will forward Rightscorp's settlement demands, requesting $20 per shared file. The company believes this is a far more superior plan than the six strikes plan, and is now taking it a bit further -- disconnection.

That's right. Rightscorp wants repeat offenders disconnected from the Internet, and 140 ISPs located in the United States are supposedly now on board.

"We push ISPs to suspend accounts of repeat copyright infringers and we currently have over 140 ISPs that are participating in our program, including suspending the accounts of repeat infringers," says Christopher Sabec, CEO of Rightscorp.

Ultimately, this disconnection model is all about creating a new stream of revenue. Rightscorp believes that with disconnection now introduced, settlements will happen more frequently. Even more, those who are disconnected can be reconnected IF the outstanding bill/fine has been paid.

"All US ISPs have a free Rightscorp website dashboard that identifies these repeat infringers and notifies the ISPs when they have settled their cases with our clients. We encourage the ISPs to restore service once the matter has been settled and there is no longer an outstanding legal liability," Sabec says.

For now, most of the larger ISPs are ignoring Rightscorp's settlement notices. Comcast will forward the notice but without the settlement offer, as does AT&T, Verizon and several others. According to TorrentFreak, Charter is the only ISP that forwards the notice in its entirety.

So who is listed in Rightscorp's list of 140? Mostly the smaller, local providers, the report reveals.

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  • Quote:
    Ahh yes, the bread and butter argument of Generation Entitlement... so <mod edit> lame. You would have to be incredibly ignorant to not realize that property, whether it is physical, digital, or intellectual, is STILL property that belongs to an individual or company. When you take a person's property, it is theft. It's really pretty cut and dry. By no means do I support the MPA, the RIAA, or any of the entertainment industry clowns and their ridiculous lobbying, DRM tactics and so forth... But damn... people like you that have somehow actually justified this in their minds as being absolutely ok just because it is not a tangible object and "you want it but weren't going to buy it"... It is no wonder many people outside of the U.S. look at us and laugh at how stupid people like you make everyone look with your complete lack of even an elementary level of common sense.. I guess I'll just go hack a database and steal your personal info and identity and sell it off to the highest bidder... I can do that right? I mean, I didn't take anything physical from your residents, so it's all good, right? Actually, I'm ENTITLED to take your personal info because, well, I want that money! That makes it all ok, because I want it.. right?..... yeah, that's how stupid you sound.


    Right, because corporations are people, we shouldn't hurt their feelings, and we should all genuflect in front of the new CEOverlords.

    As questionable as their argument is, yours is even worse. Their argument stems from a rightly justified rejection of capitalism, and although it may not express itself particularly well, has merit when faced with the failed system we're currently trying to scavenge.

    Your argument, aside from bashing its head against the wall of this slowly moving tide of resentment, is trying to defend the worst criminals out there. So you're saying it's theft, clear cut. Fine. What about the countless number of times businesses will arguably steal from millions, be it through over-hyping a product that is an utter POS and not accepting refunds, or through any other means.

    Many pirates, certainly the ones I know, use pirating as a ways to keep companies honest. A long time ago, game conglomerates realized they could make a lot more money by selling a <mod edit> game, and not providing a demo, than by producing a quality product and giving a demo showing how good it is. Piracy is a way of stopping this, the worst of "free" market capitalism, by giving them repercussions for producing a horrible product. Instead of everybody buying it and realizing how awful it is and the company getting away entirely, some few of them would try it, dislike it, delete it, and spread the words to others. If it is a good product, they buy it, and still spread the word to others.

    You call them the entitlement generation, but ask yourself this: Does it make you feel good being morally superior over those who feel they are entitled to a few games and movies produced by companies with billions in holdings, while defending the executives of the same companies that feel they are entitled to as much money as they can get their hands on by cheating and scamming, at the cost of their workers and their customers?


    Quote:
    the ISP should have no control of how someone uses the service, pirating, email, porn suffing etc...if you pay for the service then who cares how someone uses it...once they start to disconnet people from the web the ISP will start to lose money...big money...the person that's being disconnected can very easily connect back up with a different service provider
    No they can't. Sure, if you live in a big city, you have choices, but if you live anywhere outside of that, the majority of the time you only have one offering for your ISP.

    What should h ave happened was regulators getting off their collective rear end and realizing that access to the internet is as basic and necessary a commodity as electricity is, and treat it as such, making sure that all parts of the country have access rather than relying on profit-hungry companies to come in and make their decisions based on financial gain alone.
    17
  • Bondfc11: It's a nice argument but it just isn't true. These companies will always keeps prices where they want them regardless of downloading piracy. The other point is that as it is all digital there is no physical loss, nor is there actual financial loss in the majority of cases (majority, not all all cases). If a person can't afford to buy a CD or DVD for example and then download it instead, they have the audio and/or the movie but the companies has not 'lost' anything other than what they would see as a potential sale. They haven't actually lost a sale as many of these people can't afford the music of DVDs as it is. So the only difference is that the end user has something that they would not have otherwise had which makes no difference to the owning companies. The only losses they actually suffer are those by people who could, should and would otherwise actually go out and buy the products.
    16
  • File sharing is the same thing as buying a dvd and giving it to your friend to borrow, only difference is you dont have to physically hand it to them...Whats next? If I buy a dvd or game will I be breaking the law if I physically give it to a friend to borrow? In the past couple of years there has been a countless number PC games that have been poorly optimized, "not finished" or have major compatibility issues with high end setups that include dual gpus and triple monitors. This is the main reason why I torrent, to make sure what I potentially might buy works the way I expect it to. I do not play the game past the 1st mission,race, map etc. The last game I bought without testing out via torrent was titanfall. Not only was that game way over hyped but when I finally got around to playing it, it had many issues including artifacting, lag and disconnects to say the least. My main problems was IT WOULDNT WORK WITH DUAL GPU SETUPS!!!..After waiting months for this issue to be fixed I finally gave up..The only solution they could give me was to disable one of my cards. REALLY?!?! Honestly, who wants to disable a video card they just spent $300 on? anyone? didnt think so....And to the genius that said piracy is why the prices keep going up? rofl! Maybe piracy might be a contributing factor but its definitely not the sole reason behind it. Have you ever thought of the free to play scene and how many people are switching over to games like that? Do you realize dota and league of legends are the 2 biggest games right now? and they are both free? And you can get payed to play it? What about game devs wanting more money? After all, they already want your money before the game comes out with all this pre ordering garbage. Seriously people, turn your brain on...The prices will continue to get higher and higher and there are a number of reasons, not just because piracy.
    14
  • Other Comments
  • Good. People think that getting something for nothing is awesome, but don't realize these "thefts" only drive up prices (or keep prices high) for the rest of us who buy our products. Charge them, disconnect them, and hound them. If you don't like the laws in this country related to copyright/intellectual property - well you know what to do.
    -27
  • Quote:
    The company believes this is a far more superior plan than the six strikes plan, and is now taking it a bit further -- disconnection.


    /probably not intended...but nice pun.
    -12
  • Bondfc11: It's a nice argument but it just isn't true. These companies will always keeps prices where they want them regardless of downloading piracy. The other point is that as it is all digital there is no physical loss, nor is there actual financial loss in the majority of cases (majority, not all all cases). If a person can't afford to buy a CD or DVD for example and then download it instead, they have the audio and/or the movie but the companies has not 'lost' anything other than what they would see as a potential sale. They haven't actually lost a sale as many of these people can't afford the music of DVDs as it is. So the only difference is that the end user has something that they would not have otherwise had which makes no difference to the owning companies. The only losses they actually suffer are those by people who could, should and would otherwise actually go out and buy the products.
    16