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Raijintek Rolls Out Nemesis and Themis Evo CPU Coolers

By - Source: TechPowerUp | B 6 comments

Raijintek's new CPU coolers have red and white fans.

Raijintek has announced two more CPU coolers, this time bringing us the Nemesis and Themis Evo.

The Nemesis features a dual-tower heatsink design, which carries two fans. In its entirety, it measures 140 x 130 x 167 mm. The heatsink is nickel-plated, and heat is distributed through five 8 mm thick nickel-plated copper heat pipes. All this heat is dissipated through the use of two 140 mm fans, each PWM able to spin at speeds between 600 and 1000 RPM.

The Themis Evo is built on a single tower heatsink, to which heat is fed through four 8 mm thick nickel-plated copper heat pipes. The unit carries a single 120 mm fan which can rotate at speeds between 1000 RPM and 1500 RPM.

Both the coolers have support for the latest CPU sockets, including AMD's AM3+, FM2+, as well as Intel's LGA 115X and LGA 2011 sockets. The Nemesis and Themis Evo will hit shelves for €59.90 and €32.90, respectively. No word on U.S. pricing yet.

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  • 1 Hide
    nebun , February 11, 2014 5:22 AM
    nothing new here.....this so called cpu cooler market has been stagnating since 2004....noting new, everyone seems to copy everyone.....nothing original anymore, its a shame.
  • 1 Hide
    fatalshot808 , February 11, 2014 5:45 AM
    Quote:
    nothing new here.....this so called cpu cooler market has been stagnating since 2004....noting new, everyone seems to copy everyone.....nothing original anymore, its a shame.
    Well this is Tomshardware and I enjoy getting these occasional updates on products that I might be interested in. The Nemesis heatsink seems like a very quiet and efficient cooler, I would love to see a review on this later on!
  • 2 Hide
    Duckhunt , February 11, 2014 7:11 AM
    Again, The case makers and the heat sink makers need to get together and make use of the huge surface area of the case to reduce the heat and use fans less.Desktops do not have the mobility problem of laptops. Use it. Come on.
  • 0 Hide
    killerclick , February 11, 2014 9:03 AM
    Quote:
    Again, The case makers and the heat sink makers need to get together and make use of the huge surface area of the case to reduce the heat and use fans less.Desktops do not have the mobility problem of laptops. Use it. Come on.
    The problem is that the outside of a case doesn't have guaranteed airflow. Besides, how would you connect the CPU/cooler to the case, and to which part of the case and how much clearance and what kind of airflow would that part have to have to be able to cool say a 125W CPU and how would a user be certain that it does?A Zalman Reserator 6.5kg passive water cooling tower can only dissipate 210W and it's full of coolant and has been engineered to radiate heat most efficiently. How much cooling could a desktop case lid dissipate?
  • 1 Hide
    COLGeek , February 11, 2014 10:06 AM
    Look like okay heatsinks in a market full of similar competing offerings. Still, I agree that a review and some benchmarks would be very useful in determining how well these work (and whether folks should consider purchasing).
  • 1 Hide
    teh_gerbil , February 11, 2014 4:08 PM
    nebun, you get a thumbs up man. Seriously, anyone remember this:http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2012-06/heatsink-could-be-30-times-more-efficient-modern-setupsThe heatsink that basically the whole thing spins rather than the fan? Well that was JUNE 2012! A year and a half ago! Surely getting something to market should be soon!