Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Samsung May Be Working On 12.2-Inch Galaxy Note

By - Source: TechRadar | B 10 comments
Tags :

There's speculation that Samsung is working on a 12.2 inch Galaxy Note tablet.

Samsung's rumored 12.2 inch tablet has been spotted again after first surfacing back in July sporting the company's eight-core Exynos 5 Octa chip, a 2560 x 1600 resolution, and the "SM-P900" label. Now the device has appeared on the Bluetooth authentication website using the SM-P901 label, but doesn't reveal any other details save for Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity.

This unannounced tablet is believed to be the Samsung Galaxy Note 12.2, and will supposedly arrive in three flavors: the P901 in Wi-Fi only, the P900 as the 3G model, and possibly a P905 model with 4G LTE connectivity. The device will also supposedly feature Android 4.2 "Jelly Bean" out of the box, although Android 4.3 could be a possibility.

Samsung recently announced that it plans to release a software update that will allow its Exynos 5 Octa to use all eight cores simultaneously rather than one set of four cores at a time. Heterogeneous Multi-Processing (HMP) will send software threads with high priority or high computational intensity to the 'big' Cortex-A15 cores while threads with less priority or are less computationally intensive can be performed by the 'LITTLE' Cortex-A7 cores.

"Software implementation is essential to maximizing the benefits of big.LITTLE technology," the company said. "Multi-processing software controls the scheduling of threads of execution to the appropriate core. In earlier versions of the big.LITTLE software, the whole processor context is moved up to the 'big' core or down to the 'LITTLE' core based on the measured work load. In-depth study and analysis of diverse use case scenarios enable Samsung to achieve efficiency and high-performance, while managing power levels to deliver optimal user environments."

The unannounced 12.2 inch tablet will supposedly feature the S-Pen and 3 GB of RAM, possibly a step up in size from the new Galaxy Note 10.1 2014 Edition. Samsung's 10.1 inch model sports the same screen resolution, but is powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 chip instead. The smaller, official tablet also has a 2MP camera on the front, 8MP camera on the back, and Android 4.3 "Jelly Bean."

News of Bluetooth certification arrives after a supposed official product render of the tablet appeared earlier this month. This leaked build was supposedly the P900 model that's slated to be released sometime this year. What makes this render questionable is the physical Home button at the bottom, which isn't used on the company's other 10.1 inch tablets. However, a physical Home button does appear on Samsung's 8 inch tablets, phones and phablets, so who knows at this point.

 

Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

 

Contact Us for News Tips, Corrections and Feedback

Discuss
Ask a Category Expert

Create a new thread in the News comments forum about this subject

Example: Notebook, Android, SSD hard drive

This thread is closed for comments
  • 1 Hide
    patrick47018 , September 21, 2013 6:37 PM
    This could be really sweet!
  • 2 Hide
    capt_taco , September 21, 2013 7:54 PM
    In other words, Samsung is working on a thin touchscreen laptop.
  • -1 Hide
    cherrymanghang , September 21, 2013 10:19 PM
    When was this article written? Didn't the writer of this article ever seen the Galaxy Note 10.1 2014 edition? Because it already sports a physical home button...you should know that because the device was announced last Sept. 4..or was this article just copied from another site that was written ages ago???
  • Display all 10 comments.
  • 0 Hide
    voltagetoe , September 21, 2013 10:42 PM
    I like the S-Pen ! This device is precisely what I've been looking for.
  • 0 Hide
    rwinches , September 21, 2013 11:03 PM
    big.LITTLE MP is not about running all cores at the same time, although that might happen on occasion. It is an evolution of the spec that allows cores to be brought on-line, as it were, when needed. The main point is power efficiency.

    Look at how Apple had to make changes to their iOS to accommodate the power draw of the 64 bit chip. They toned down the graphics and upped the battery size, but spun it as improved. I like the big.LITTLE MP implementation much better for now.
  • -2 Hide
    teh_chem , September 22, 2013 8:15 AM
    After using a TF101 (10") tablet, I found even that size to be too far too large for a comfortable, practical, mobile tablet form factor. Couldn't fathom using a 12+" tablet, unless perhaps it's as a laptop replacement (with a keyboard dock, of course).
  • 1 Hide
    MarkMcCoskey , September 22, 2013 10:18 AM
    I think this 12.2 will be a very nice upgrade for my HP Touchpad running CM9!
  • -1 Hide
    7amood , September 22, 2013 2:48 PM
    WTF!! this was out like three weeks ago
    shouldn't have posted it as news... this is embarrassing...
  • 0 Hide
    classzero , September 23, 2013 7:47 AM
    I am not a huge lover of Android but I would purchase this device. Windows 8, 8.1 is not my cup of tea. Android will soon be the dominate OS. Hopefully Android will allow Devs to develop on an Android too. This is the biggest problem with tablets is they are simple consumption devices. Soon one will not be able to purchase a true computer for developing...
  • 0 Hide
    stevejnb , September 23, 2013 7:55 AM
    Quote:
    I am not a huge lover of Android but I would purchase this device. Windows 8, 8.1 is not my cup of tea. Android will soon be the dominate OS. Hopefully Android will allow Devs to develop on an Android too. This is the biggest problem with tablets is they are simple consumption devices. Soon one will not be able to purchase a true computer for developing...


    Isn't Android already quite open for developers? I mean, the Play store isn't necessarily totally open, though it is quite liberal in what it lets on there, but there is nothing stopping developers from putting their own .apk files up for download just via the web. Is there a legal reason preventing devs from developing store'less apps for Android? Honestly curious.