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Researchers Believe Nanoresonators Could Fix Dropped Calls

By - Source: Purduie University | B 13 comments

Scientists at Purdue University believe that nanoresonators might be useful to reduce the number of dropped calls, busy signals and negatively impacted data downloads in cellphones and other mobile devices.

The idea: Make much more effective use of the available spectrum with exactly defined channels, reject noise and allow signals only near a given frequency to pass.

To achieve this goal, the scientists created "nanoelectromechanical resonators" that integrate "a tiny beam of silicon that vibrates when voltage is applied." This beam, about two microns long and 130 nanometers wide, vibrate side-to-side or up and down and apparently have shown to control their vibration frequencies better than other resonators. According to the scientists, the resonators can be tuned for lower power consumption or higher performance.

"A vivid example [for this nanoresonator] is a tunable filter," said Saeed Mohammadi, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, at Purdue. "It is very difficult to make a good tunable filter with transistors, inductors and other electronic components, but a simple nanomechanical resonator can do the job with much better performance and at a fraction of the power."

According to Mohammadi, the nanoresonator can be easily mass-produced using a using silicon-on-insulator process. There was no information whether these resonators will be commercialized, but Purdue said that it has filed a patent application protecting the concept.

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Top Comments
  • 21 Hide
    getochkn , September 2, 2012 1:21 AM
    madjimmsWould be helpful if we could zoom into the pic.... Clicking it just makes a page pop-up with the EXACT same size image.


    Welcome to Toms 1994 graphics system for there site. You forgot to mention the pop-up is after clicking brings you to a new page, so you have to close a window, and then go back to get back to the article, all to see the same image 3 times the exact same size.
  • 16 Hide
    madjimms , September 2, 2012 1:05 AM
    Would be helpful if we could zoom into the pic.... Clicking it just makes a page pop-up with the EXACT same size image.
Other Comments
  • 16 Hide
    madjimms , September 2, 2012 1:05 AM
    Would be helpful if we could zoom into the pic.... Clicking it just makes a page pop-up with the EXACT same size image.
  • Display all 13 comments.
  • 21 Hide
    getochkn , September 2, 2012 1:21 AM
    madjimmsWould be helpful if we could zoom into the pic.... Clicking it just makes a page pop-up with the EXACT same size image.


    Welcome to Toms 1994 graphics system for there site. You forgot to mention the pop-up is after clicking brings you to a new page, so you have to close a window, and then go back to get back to the article, all to see the same image 3 times the exact same size.
  • 1 Hide
    joytech22 , September 2, 2012 1:22 AM
    Could they use this same technology for ADSL2+ and improve the SNR of our connections...?
    That could possibly boost my internet speed quite high.
  • 0 Hide
    boiler1990 , September 2, 2012 2:14 AM
    Boiler up!
  • 2 Hide
    jdog2pt0 , September 2, 2012 2:17 AM
    joytech22Could they use this same technology for ADSL2+ and improve the SNR of our connections...?That could possibly boost my internet speed quite high.


    It's called VDSL. It's the next technology up from ADSL, and if I remember correctly it's allows up to 100mbps. My ISP just recently upgraded from ADSL to VDSL and we're on a 40mbps package.
  • 2 Hide
    A Bad Day , September 2, 2012 2:37 AM
    And the bandwidth caps with connection throttling will still stay in place.
  • -1 Hide
    sixdegree , September 2, 2012 2:39 AM
    Quote:
    "a tiny beam of silicon that vibrates when voltage is applied."

    A miniaturized vibrator then? Thank you science.
  • 0 Hide
    Antimatter79 , September 2, 2012 6:24 AM
    A concept actually deserving of a patent.
  • 1 Hide
    thecolorblue , September 2, 2012 7:16 AM
    A Bad DayAnd the bandwidth caps with connection throttling will still stay in place.

    this
  • -1 Hide
    freggo , September 2, 2012 4:22 PM
    sixdegreeA miniaturized vibrator then? Thank you science.


    There will be a 'black edition' of course :-)

    And I shut up now :-)

  • -1 Hide
    aliassund , September 2, 2012 9:07 PM
    Will not work. This tiny structure is not capable of handling the power that sometimes hits the receiver of a cell phone or other wireless device.
  • -1 Hide
    nebun , September 3, 2012 5:10 AM
    the only thing that can fix dropped calls is upgrading and adding new towers to handle more traffic, not some unproven tech
  • 0 Hide
    freggo , September 3, 2012 10:51 AM
    nebunthe only thing that can fix dropped calls is upgrading and adding new towers to handle more traffic, not some unproven tech


    I do not know who you are of course, but my money is on those "Scientists at Purdue University".
    I have a feeling they know what can and can not be done :-)