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Hacker Gets 30 Months Prison Term for Infecting 72,000 PCs

By - Source: PC Magazine | B 49 comments

A hacker received a 30 month in prison sentence for creating a botnet and a charge of violating the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

30-year old Joshua Schichtel had pleaded guilty to building the 72,000 computer net in 2009 as a service to customers who would ask him to infect computers with various types of malware. Apparently, Schichtel accepted a $1,500 payment from a customer in one specific case.

Following the 30 month prison term, Schichtel will have to comply with a 3-year of supervised release order. Joshua Schichtel has been involved in a legal investigation before. He was included in a 2004 complaint in which he and others were accused of infecting thousands of users for the purpose of a Denial of Service attack.

The 2004 charges against the "DDoS Mafia" for hire were dismissed due to a passed indictment deadline.

 

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Top Comments
  • 21 Hide
    aftcomet , September 8, 2012 10:01 PM
    Good. One less criminal bastard hiding behind a monitor.
  • 20 Hide
    lahawzel , September 8, 2012 11:35 PM
    Meanwhile, pirating one song lands you with five years in jail if the RIAA finds out...

    Law enforcement needs to spend their time tracking down actual malicious criminals like this guy. Not random guys who just want to listen to some free music.
  • 20 Hide
    azraa , September 8, 2012 10:17 PM
    Too bad guys like him go to prison.
    Don't get me wrong, he deserves the time, but I mean that he has, evidently, some talent programming and detecting exploits. That is the kind of talent that software companies look. He just followed a coward's path.
Other Comments
    Display all 49 comments.
  • 21 Hide
    aftcomet , September 8, 2012 10:01 PM
    Good. One less criminal bastard hiding behind a monitor.
  • 12 Hide
    halcyon , September 8, 2012 10:08 PM
    Seems appropriate.
  • 20 Hide
    azraa , September 8, 2012 10:17 PM
    Too bad guys like him go to prison.
    Don't get me wrong, he deserves the time, but I mean that he has, evidently, some talent programming and detecting exploits. That is the kind of talent that software companies look. He just followed a coward's path.
  • 1 Hide
    castle songbird , September 8, 2012 10:48 PM
    aftcometYou're right. He caused countless people all sorts of problems and was basically an online hitman for hire. What we should really do is give him a nice job in a high paying position. Maybe throw in some benefits too.


    "What is reading comprehension I'm new here" - you
  • 18 Hide
    teh_chem , September 8, 2012 11:26 PM
    memadmaxOne of countless hackers out there.If you get hacked it's ur own damn fault...People live in their own dream world bubble sometimes, it pisses me off and needs to be popped...

    That makes just as much sense as saying it's your own fault if you get robbed. It's not my fault if I get "hacked." There are measures you can take to try to prevent that, but it's the offender's fault--and hence their responsibility.

    I'm all for punishing for knowingly aiding in the malicious attacks against computer users.
  • 20 Hide
    lahawzel , September 8, 2012 11:35 PM
    Meanwhile, pirating one song lands you with five years in jail if the RIAA finds out...

    Law enforcement needs to spend their time tracking down actual malicious criminals like this guy. Not random guys who just want to listen to some free music.
  • -4 Hide
    Anonymous , September 8, 2012 11:40 PM
    Cut his fingers off so he can't use a keyboard again.
  • 12 Hide
    Nakal , September 8, 2012 11:43 PM
    aftcometYou're right. He caused countless people all sorts of problems and was basically an online hitman for hire. What we should really do is give him a nice job in a high paying position. Maybe throw in some benefits too.


    That is not what he meant. What he meant was, the guy has talent and skill, but wasted it on criminal activities and scams. He could have been working at a legitimate company or even on his own doing legitimate work.
  • 2 Hide
    blazorthon , September 8, 2012 11:49 PM
    LaHawzelMeanwhile, pirating one song lands you with five years in jail if the RIAA finds out...Law enforcement needs to spend their time tracking down actual malicious criminals like this guy. Not random guys who just want to listen to some free music.


    Digital piracy is still a crime. The punishment for it is generally far beyond reason, but that just means that the punishment should be brought down to a reasonable level, not averted entirely.
  • 1 Hide
    john_4 , September 8, 2012 11:55 PM
    Hope his cell-mate's name is Bubba who thinks he is cute.
  • 15 Hide
    A Bad Day , September 9, 2012 12:10 AM
    c123s234So wait... I thought stupidity wasn't a crime. These people failed to actively protect their personal devices, why he he getting punished for that. It'd be like someone dropping a $20 bill out of ther pocket without realizing it and someone picking it to keep it. Immoral, yes... but is it a crime? Not really, or at least in this example extremely difficulty to punish. These ~72,000 victims don't deserve this "justice." Short of these systems relaying a message that they'll prosecute unathorized access attempts. I doubt any of these people did, since it really isn't a common thing to do at all.The U.S. courts aren't for policing online activity, and if people don't like that they shouldn't connect their computers to the Internet. Seriously....Now, why am I defending this guy?I'm not, I'm just saying I don't like the fact they went after this guy. I pay taxes. The amount of money that goes into prosecuting and then incarserating this guy is hardly worth my money for other citizens being foolish. They got what they deserved. They opened up their personal information and put a "free" sign on it. When will people start taking some damn responsibility for being stupid?Before you make the argument that if I were one of them I'd want something done about it, try again... I would have got what I deserved. Sure it would be a nightmare to deal with fixing everything, but if they really got pass the secruity then it was my own damn fault.


    *Smashes your car's windshield, and steals your $20 bill that was lying on the dashboard.*


    Yeah, IT'S YOUR FAULT FOR NOT INSTALLING UNBREAKABLE GLASS ON YOUR CAR, MORON!

    (One of my uncles is a police officer, and he said that one of his buddies' police car's windshield was destroyed because of a $10 bill lying on the dashboard.)
  • 6 Hide
    blazorthon , September 9, 2012 12:11 AM
    c123s234So wait... I thought stupidity wasn't a crime. These people failed to actively protect their personal devices, why he he getting punished for that. It'd be like someone dropping a $20 bill out of ther pocket without realizing it and someone picking it to keep it. Immoral, yes... but is it a crime? Not really, or at least in this example extremely difficulty to punish. These ~72,000 victims don't deserve this "justice." Short of these systems relaying a message that they'll prosecute unathorized access attempts. I doubt any of these people did, since it really isn't a common thing to do at all.The U.S. courts aren't for policing online activity, and if people don't like that they shouldn't connect their computers to the Internet. Seriously....Now, why am I defending this guy?I'm not, I'm just saying I don't like the fact they went after this guy. I pay taxes. The amount of money that goes into prosecuting and then incarserating this guy is hardly worth my money for other citizens being foolish. They got what they deserved. They opened up their personal information and put a "free" sign on it. When will people start taking some damn responsibility for being stupid?Before you make the argument that if I were one of them I'd want something done about it, try again... I would have got what I deserved. Sure it would be a nightmare to deal with fixing everything, but if they really got pass the secruity then it was my own damn fault.


    He ran a business through illegally commandeering more than 70K computers and infecting them with malware without the permission of the owners. This is not comparable whatsoever to picking up a $20 bill found on the ground. He committed a crime against thousands of people and should be punished for it.
  • 2 Hide
    A Bad Day , September 9, 2012 12:47 AM
    blazorthonHe ran a business through illegally commandeering more than 70K computers and infecting them with malware without the permission of the owners. This is not comparable whatsoever to picking up a $20 bill found on the ground. He committed a crime against thousands of people and should be punished for it.


    Defending the hacker is like defending scam/break-in artists. Should people allowed to be scammed or have their stuff broken in for being "stupid"?
  • 5 Hide
    blazorthon , September 9, 2012 1:03 AM
    A Bad DayDefending the hacker is like defending scam/break-in artists. Should people allowed to be scammed or have their stuff broken in for being "stupid"?


    His victim's ignorance of computers doesn't excuse his abuse of them.
  • 2 Hide
    halcyon , September 9, 2012 1:16 AM
    devotieconWhat, no pic of the pasty, fat, pizza-faced, lump of shit? ...that's what I envision all hackers to look like.

    lol
  • -1 Hide
    carver_g , September 9, 2012 1:45 AM
    memadmaxOne of countless hackers out there.If you get hacked it's ur own damn fault...People live in their own dream world bubble sometimes, it pisses me off and needs to be popped...


    Totally depends. If you get hacked by some random drifter just looking to steal credit card data, that is definitely your fault for not faithfully conforming to PCI or FISMA standards. But if Anonymous or some other organized group is hell bent on hacking you out of revenge or whatever reason, there is absolutely nothing you can do about it except unplug your LAN firewall from your perimeter network switch.
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