Toshiba Tests Super High Density 2.5Tb Tech

Are we all about the SSDs these days? From a performance standpoint, yes, but for mass storage needs, it's tough to beat the magnets.

Toshiba is devoting time into the old hard disk realm and have come up with a way to fit lots more data on a given space. The company claims to have successfully produced a hard disk where the magnetic bits are organized in rows; this is called bit-patterned media.

With its bit-patterned prototype, Toshiba said that it has achieved a density of 2.5 terabits per square inch. This is way ahead of what's available on current drives, which top out at 541 gigabits per square inch.

It'll be a while before we see drives based on this technology, however, as Toshiba doesn't see these hitting the market before 2013, according to IDG.

Read more from the EETimes.

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  • ^ Probably R&D. I would think it would market itself. That is a lot of storage. By 2013, SSD prices will have dropped but I don't think they will have the same capacity (at a competitive price) as the good ole HDD. For mass/cheap storage, HDDs are going to be around for some time to come.
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  • Quote:
    By 2013, I'd be curious to see if 2.5tb is still as impressive as it sounds at this moment.


    They arnt talking about a 2.5tb drive, they are talking about per in(2).
    equivalent to around a 10tb drive on 3 platers. And 10tb is alot of disc space.
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  • Is the 2013 timeframe due to R&D and Manufacturing or due to marketing like with the CDROM speeds back in the day?
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  • ^ Probably R&D. I would think it would market itself. That is a lot of storage. By 2013, SSD prices will have dropped but I don't think they will have the same capacity (at a competitive price) as the good ole HDD. For mass/cheap storage, HDDs are going to be around for some time to come.
    12
  • By 2013 SSDs should have an adequate amount of storage. At least enough for the enthusiasts. Still, 2.5TB per square inch is amazing. I can just use that as a cheap archive drive.
    5