Tesoro's Tizona Mechanical Keyboard Comes in Two Pieces

Tesoro has announced a new keyboard, though to get the full keyboard you need to buy two separate SKUs – the Tizona keyboard and the Tizona numpad.

Both devices are made with mechanical switches which follow either the Blue, Black, Brown, or Red typing characteristics. The switches are marketed as "Gaming-Grade mechanical switches," so it's safe to assume that they are not made by Cherry. That's not necessarily a bad thing though, and Tesoro is certainly not the first manufacturer to make a mechanical keyboard without using Cherry MX switches. Tesoro's switches are rated to have a lifetime of 50 million clicks.

Both the keyboard and the numpad also come with a braided detachable cable, though the keyboard features a cable with gold-plated connectors. The cables are both 1.8 meters long. Both units also have a 1000 Hz USB polling rate for ultra-fast response times, and come with N-Key rollover support, though they can be switched to have a 6 KRO. They also both have magnets so that they can be nicely attached to each other.

Pricing for the keyboard is set at $89 in the U.S., with the numpad element set to cost $35. The units should be available on shelves, depending on your location.

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  • Spanky Deluxe
    I don't get why there is still a market for mechanical keyboards aside from for nostalgia. They are slower to type on and far more likely to induce RSI due to the greater travel and exertion required by fingers.
    -12
  • Arkane-BLUE
    Quote:
    I don't get why there is still a market for mechanical keyboards aside from for nostalgia. They are slower to type on and far more likely to induce RSI due to the greater travel and exertion required by fingers.

    Obviously you've never used one, they're wonderful to use.
    Since getting one, I haven't had any finger fatigue, probably due to the spring-loaded keys, oppose to mushing rubberdomes. If anything, my accuracy has improved. I'm not crazy about the design of this one, though. Then again, I never cared about the tenkeyless options, I still prefer a 104/108 keyed board. l'll stick with my Ducky Shine.
    5
  • user 18
    Quote:
    I don't get why there is still a market for mechanical keyboards aside from for nostalgia. They are slower to type on and far more likely to induce RSI due to the greater travel and exertion required by fingers.


    Mechanical keyboards are generally faster to type on, and a large number of switch designs actually require less travel distance and less force to actuate than a standard rubber dome keyboard.

    Beyond that, I personally find my mechanical boards (yes, plural) much more enjoyable to type on, to say nothing of increased speed and accuracy.
    6