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G.Skill Releases TridentX DDR3 Kits for Ivy Bridge

By - Source: G.Skill | B 45 comments

G.Skill is offering DDR3 memory kits for Intel's Ivy bridge processors and Z77 platform.

Released as TridentX series memory kits, the devices are available in 2400 MHz, 2600 MHz, 2666 MHz and 2800 MHz versions. The company says that the 2800 MHz kit has been overclocked to 3320 MHz, while the 2666 MHz kit has reached 2933 MHz.

According to the manufacturer, the TridentX memory ships with a removable top fin heat spreader to provide more flexibility when enthusiasts want to use the memory with other memory cooling systems.

The new TridentX memory is offered in 8 GB, 16 GB and 32 GB kits. pricing has not been released.

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Top Comments
  • 20 Hide
    thehelix , April 29, 2012 1:51 PM
    Do those fins on ram modules actually do anything or they are there just for the looks?
  • 18 Hide
    halcyon , April 29, 2012 1:38 PM
    Wow. Makes my little 2000Mhz Corsairs look pathetic in comparison.
  • 17 Hide
    halcyon , April 29, 2012 2:31 PM
    A Bad DayIf you're not going for extreme RAM OCing, RAM heatsinks and waterblocks are useless.

    Well, they do tend to look nice and that seems to be their usual purpose.
Other Comments
  • 14 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , April 29, 2012 1:35 PM
    1.65V? Where's the promised voltage drop from Sandy Bridge's 1.5V RAM?
  • 18 Hide
    halcyon , April 29, 2012 1:38 PM
    Wow. Makes my little 2000Mhz Corsairs look pathetic in comparison.
  • 20 Hide
    thehelix , April 29, 2012 1:51 PM
    Do those fins on ram modules actually do anything or they are there just for the looks?
  • 13 Hide
    A Bad Day , April 29, 2012 2:28 PM
    TheHelixDo those fins on ram modules actually do anything or they are there just for the looks?


    If you're not going for extreme RAM OCing, RAM heatsinks and waterblocks are useless.
  • 17 Hide
    halcyon , April 29, 2012 2:31 PM
    A Bad DayIf you're not going for extreme RAM OCing, RAM heatsinks and waterblocks are useless.

    Well, they do tend to look nice and that seems to be their usual purpose.
  • 8 Hide
    yumri , April 29, 2012 2:50 PM
    A Bad DayIf you're not going for extreme RAM OCing, RAM heatsinks and waterblocks are useless.

    usually yes they are just for looks but for these they might actually put off enough heat to warrant having a heat spreader on the RAM sticks as they go almost twice the entry speeds of the first Sandy bridge RAM memory controller speeds ( they were later increased to higher DDR3 speeds ). What i am also wondering is in the spec for Ivy bridge it had 2 memory controllers one for DDR3 and one for XDR so where is our XDR RAM motherboards or was that memory controller dropped in the final design of Ivy bridge?
  • -6 Hide
    c_for , April 29, 2012 2:52 PM
    The Trident RAM has 5 tines on top of the heatsync...

    Things that make you go Hmmmmmm
  • -8 Hide
    Anonymous , April 29, 2012 3:03 PM
    and, it could boost performance by nearly 1% in certain synthetic benchmarks, but if you're building a big gaming rig in an attempt to compensate for a small male-part, that may not matter to you.
  • -7 Hide
    sykozis , April 29, 2012 3:38 PM
    Why are all these memory kits at 1.65v when the voltage limit for both SB and IB is only 1.5v???
  • 3 Hide
    halcyon , April 29, 2012 3:40 PM
    sykozisWhy are all these memory kits at 1.65v when the voltage limit for both SB and IB is only 1.5v???

    Did you see the first comment?
  • 0 Hide
    __-_-_-__ , April 29, 2012 4:05 PM
    very high timing.
  • 7 Hide
    Soda-88 , April 29, 2012 4:08 PM
    sykozisWhy are all these memory kits at 1.65v when the voltage limit for both SB and IB is only 1.5v???


    Because you need some more juice to run at those speeds I'd assume.
  • 2 Hide
    ojas , April 29, 2012 4:37 PM
    amk-aka-phantom1.65V? Where's the promised voltage drop from Sandy Bridge's 1.5V RAM?

    If you read Intel's spec sheets then you'll see they say that 7-series mobos support both 1.35v and 1.5v RAM. In fact even some of the newer 6-series mobos had support for 1.35v.

    I guess these 1.65v sticks are for compatible motherboards only, or if you're adventurous enough ;) 
  • -1 Hide
    frombehind , April 29, 2012 4:56 PM
    funny story about that ~3 GhZ ram.... Ivy bridge can only interface with its ram up to 1600 MhZ. Anything above this can be considered wasteful. While faster ram CAN impact some synthetic benchmarks... FPS in games, nor any processing speeds in applications will not increase 1 bit past 1600. The only real way ram can gain "speed" is cap out to 1600 and get the lowest latency ram you can find. Many CL 7 kits can be purchased at that speed... these kits at CL10 and CL11 are a tough sell for anyone who knows what they are doing building a computer.
  • -1 Hide
    anort3 , April 29, 2012 4:58 PM
    I wonder if anything over 1.5v voids the CPU warranty like with Sandy Bridge? If not that seems odd to me since Ivy Bridge hates high voltage so much when overclocking.
  • 7 Hide
    Why_Me , April 29, 2012 5:20 PM
    Quote:
    1.65V? Where's the promised voltage drop from Sandy Bridge's 1.5V RAM?

    +1

    I though we were done with high voltage RAM. It looks like were going backwards instead of forward.
  • 2 Hide
    CaedenV , April 29, 2012 5:21 PM
    A Bad DayIf you're not going for extreme RAM OCing, RAM heatsinks and waterblocks are useless.

    You mean that being pretty isn't a use? :p 
  • 5 Hide
    erunion , April 29, 2012 5:37 PM
    Latency?
  • 2 Hide
    razor512 , April 29, 2012 6:14 PM
    while this RAM won't cause a notiecable increase in performance, it will improve your ability to overclock CPU's with locked multipliers without introducing a memory bottleneck from having to lower a memory divider a few notches and not be able push the bus speed high enough to get the memory back to it's recommended speed.

    with this RAM simply leave the RAM at default ratio and just push the bus speed as far as you need.
  • -1 Hide
    xtreme5 , April 29, 2012 6:20 PM
    would it worth to get 2800mhz??????????
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