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ZaReason Rolls Out First Linux Ultrabook

By - Source: ZDNet | B 26 comments

Running Linux instead of Windows does not necessarily mean that your computer will be cheaper.

ZaReason's UltraLap is a reminder that even Linux will not bring down the price of still-expensive Ultrabooks to a more affordable level.

The UltraLap comes with Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, is based on Intel's i3-3217U Ivy Bridge processor, and is priced from $899 with a 32 GB mSATA SSD. Want a 128 GB drive instead? That will lift the price to $1,028. Add a faster processor, upgrade from 4 to 16 GB of memory, upgrade to a 256 SSD as well as throw in second 512 GB SSD, and you are looking at $1,865.

These are very comparable prices and should not be too surprising for those who really want a Linux Ultrabook from the get-go. It may be even surprising that ZaReason can offer the device for this price due to the lack of volume discounts the larger vendors can secure. The best feature may be that that you can choose your Linux distribution and opt also for Kubunutu, Edubuntu, Debian, Mint, Fedora - or any other widely available flavor at no extra charge.

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  • 4 Hide
    master_chen , September 7, 2012 11:47 AM
    Linux is free.
    By buying a laptop with pre-installed Linux, you pay for Linux.
  • -6 Hide
    halcyon , September 7, 2012 12:08 PM
    I guess there is a market for a Linux ultrabook. ...but I wonder where.
  • 4 Hide
    classzero , September 7, 2012 12:40 PM
    I think these will gain popularity was windows 8 rolls out.
  • 3 Hide
    master_chen , September 7, 2012 1:01 PM
    crabdogProblem is that all of these linux distros even in the latest LTS versions are still riddled with bugs and errors. Ubuntu is the most reliable of them.


    Just say that you can't into Archie. >:3
  • 8 Hide
    manicmike , September 7, 2012 1:14 PM
    Quote:
    Linux is free.
    By buying a laptop with pre-installed Linux, you pay for Linux.


    You aren't paying for Linux, per se, but rather the effort of having someone else install it for you. Just like if you have Geek Squad install Windows for you, you could do it yourself, but you're paying someone else to do it instead.
  • 9 Hide
    john_4 , September 7, 2012 1:16 PM
    Cool for the growing support of Linux. The way Apple is heading my next laptop will be Linux again.
  • 7 Hide
    volvavite , September 7, 2012 1:24 PM
    crabdogProblem is that all of these linux distros even in the latest LTS versions are still riddled with bugs and errors.

    If you see a bug, report it, and help the community on solving it. That being said, Ubuntu 12.04.1 LTS is rock solid, at least on my experience.
    crabdogUbuntu is the most reliable of them all but you have to take on Unity along with it.

    Unity is great, IMO, but you can always try Linux Mint, or Xubuntu, for example. They all benefit of the reliability of Ubuntu, and Xubuntu is an official derivative that is an LTS for 12.04 as well.
    I use Xubuntu 12.04 on my eeePC and it is fast and awesome.
  • 7 Hide
    myromance123 , September 7, 2012 1:25 PM
    Once I start working, I really hope to buy one of ZaReason's or System76's computers.
    Just to make it clear, when my local Ubuntu team used to sell Ubuntu, I purchased Ubuntu discs. Why? Because it's worth it.

    I feel sad that Tom's started the article with:
    ZaReason's UltraLap is a reminder that even Linux will not bring down the price of still-expensive Ultrabooks to a more affordable level.

    I guess the writer's over at Tom's don't favor Linux much. Thanks for updating me on ZaReason's new machine though.
  • 4 Hide
    Anonymous , September 7, 2012 1:34 PM
    The big advantage of buying from ZaReason is that you don't have to guess if there will be issues using all of the hardware under Linux. They designed each one with that goal in mind and do thorough testing before they start selling them.
  • 0 Hide
    damianrobertjones , September 7, 2012 2:36 PM
    Improved battery life?
  • 1 Hide
    baconeater , September 7, 2012 2:54 PM
    Call me crazy, but get a $799 HP or Asus ultrabook and put FREE linux on it. I think the mainstream companies have the power of economies of scale to have lower ultrabook prices.
  • 3 Hide
    warbler boy , September 7, 2012 3:18 PM
    I'm running Ubuntu on a cheap Toshiba Portege Z830 ultrabook and it works great. Even keyboard backlighting works and Unity is sweet.
  • 2 Hide
    PhilFrisbie , September 7, 2012 3:52 PM
    The main pricing issue with Ultrabooks is the expensive Intel processor with wimpy Intel graphics! Give me a slightly bulkier AMD system with an A4 or A6 CPU with several times the graphics speed for hundreds of dollars less any day. . .
  • 1 Hide
    matt_b , September 7, 2012 4:13 PM
    master_chenLinux is free.By buying a laptop with pre-installed Linux, you pay for Linux.

    Exactly. I have contacted Dell in the past about the pricing issue between Windows and Linux being the same. Their CS person told me that it is in fact much cheaper to produce the Linux computer OS cost wise. The extra cost is due to them having to pull a Windows computer off of the assembly line and install the different OS - hence the extra cost: labor. Unless there is some first-rate support for from these guys, I prefer doing the same as master_chen and pocket the difference myself.
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , September 7, 2012 4:40 PM
    There should be an option to buy with 'no operating system' so you can install it yourself. Thus no additional charge for advanced users.
  • 0 Hide
    aicom , September 7, 2012 5:54 PM
    linux4lifeThere should be an option to buy with 'no operating system' so you can install it yourself. Thus no additional charge for advanced users.


    The issue is the OEMs actually get paid to put bloatware on systems. That's why Windows PCs can be sold so cheap (at or slightly below BOM).
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , September 7, 2012 6:22 PM
    I'd just like to interject for a moment. What you’re referring to as Linux, is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I’ve recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux. Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.

    Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called “Linux”, and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project. There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use.

    Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine’s resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called “Linux” distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux.
  • 0 Hide
    aicom , September 7, 2012 6:25 PM
    stalledmanI'd just like to interject for a moment. What you’re referring to as Linux, is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I’ve recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux. Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called “Linux”, and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project. There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use.Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine’s resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called “Linux” distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux.


    Just take mentioning Linux positively as a win. No use trolling and reducing your
  • -2 Hide
    aicom , September 7, 2012 6:26 PM
    meh... reducing your sub 1 percent market share.
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