Valve Claims to Have Made DRM "Obsolete"

Selling a game on Valve’s Steam service is already a safeguard against piracy, but now the developer has come up with a new technology that it claims will make DRM “obsolete.”

In an age when game publishers are desperately seeking a DRM solution that will protect their investments, and where legit gamers who purchase their games are often the ones who suffer from invasive protection schemes, Valve’s claim that it has made DRM obsolete is a bold one.

Valve’s new method technology is called Custom Executable Generation (CEG), which make a unique copy each games for each user--essentially rendering the game unplayable but anyone else. The CEG will allow game access on multiple machines without install limits and without having to install root kits.

CEG is now an integrated part of Steamworks, a complete suite of publishing and development tools that are available free of charge to developers and publishers worldwide for putting content on Steam.

Also a part of the new Steamworks is support for in-game downloadable content (DLC), allowing users to make immediate purchases and experience the new content in the same game session. Added is the new matchmaking system that was shipped and tested in Left 4 Dead.

"Delivering this extension of services on Steamworks first anniversary, demonstrates our commitment to continually develop the platform to better serve the community working with these tools," said Gabe Newell, president and co-founder of Valve. "As we roll out these features, we continue to look for new ways make PC games easier to create and better for customers to experience."

Of course, Valve’s claim that CEG makes DRM obsolete only applies if a publisher puts its game on Steam. With CEG and Steam’s previously existing protection system, we hope to see even more developer and publisher support on Valve’s gaming ecosystem.

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  • hurbt
    Quote:
    Valve’s new method technology is called Custom Executable Generation (CEG), which make a unique copy each games for each user--essentially rendering the game unplayable but anyone else.


    Were you drunk when you wrote this? I know what you're trying to say, but comon. My 8 year old can write with better grammar than that.
    15
  • Xenophage
    Can someone who went to 4th grade please re-write this article?
    14
  • Anonymous
    I went to a local GameStop to buy Left 4 Dead for my sisters birthday present. They tried to give me an opened copy, priced as brand new. I was disgusted, since last time I went to a game store their opened display boxes went for a discount (never played, but box was opened). I told them heck no I'm not paying full price for something already opened (just disk was inside... not even any inserts!) and said I'll go to another game store, to which they responded "What game store is he talking about..."
    I went across town to Game Crazy. They didn't even have the game and told me they only got copies for the preorder. This game came out middle of November and it was the middle of February. I was furious. I'd heard about steam from Toms and other people, giving it good reviews and hearing about DRM removal on most games, so I checked it out. I found left 4 dead but also other "packs" that L4D comes with. I bought the Valve Complete Pack, which comes with L4D and 20 other games (Some of which my old friend played and I figured I should check them out too) for $99, all rootkit free.
    I am VERY happy with that decision. Though I miss purchasing something physical, I have spent a bit of change buying games, especially since they have sales and deals all the time, most of the games I wouldn't have even considered (World of Goo is a gem, and at only $5 at the time) if it wasn't for Steam. Get Steam if you want access to all of your games, you will not be disappointed.
    10
  • Other Comments
  • hurbt
    Quote:
    Valve’s new method technology is called Custom Executable Generation (CEG), which make a unique copy each games for each user--essentially rendering the game unplayable but anyone else.


    Were you drunk when you wrote this? I know what you're trying to say, but comon. My 8 year old can write with better grammar than that.
    15
  • Anonymous
    I went to a local GameStop to buy Left 4 Dead for my sisters birthday present. They tried to give me an opened copy, priced as brand new. I was disgusted, since last time I went to a game store their opened display boxes went for a discount (never played, but box was opened). I told them heck no I'm not paying full price for something already opened (just disk was inside... not even any inserts!) and said I'll go to another game store, to which they responded "What game store is he talking about..."
    I went across town to Game Crazy. They didn't even have the game and told me they only got copies for the preorder. This game came out middle of November and it was the middle of February. I was furious. I'd heard about steam from Toms and other people, giving it good reviews and hearing about DRM removal on most games, so I checked it out. I found left 4 dead but also other "packs" that L4D comes with. I bought the Valve Complete Pack, which comes with L4D and 20 other games (Some of which my old friend played and I figured I should check them out too) for $99, all rootkit free.
    I am VERY happy with that decision. Though I miss purchasing something physical, I have spent a bit of change buying games, especially since they have sales and deals all the time, most of the games I wouldn't have even considered (World of Goo is a gem, and at only $5 at the time) if it wasn't for Steam. Get Steam if you want access to all of your games, you will not be disappointed.
    10
  • Tindytim
    I love Steam more and more everyday. Although I'd be great if we saw some competition. As great as some of the prices are at the moment, if it takes a large percentage of the gaming marketshare it may become a bit more imposing.
    6