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Valve Software Joins the Linux Foundation

By - Source: The Linux Foundation | B 36 comments

Valve Software is now finally part of the Linux Foundation collective.

The Linux Foundation announced on Wednesday that Valve Software has finally become one of its newest members, along with the HSA Foundation that's backed by AMD, ARM, Imagination Technologies, Qualcomm and a number of others. Valve Software is currently working on SteamOS, a Linux-based gaming platform designed to be the core OS for its Steam Machines PC "console" initiative.

"Joining the Linux Foundation is one of many ways Valve is investing in the advancement of Linux gaming. Through these efforts, we hope to contribute tools for developers building new experiences on Linux, compel hardware manufacturers to prioritize support for Linux, and ultimately deliver an elegant and open platform for Linux users," said Mike Sartain of Valve.

Platinum members of the Linux Foundation include Fujitsu, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Intel, NEC, Oracle, Qualcomm and Samsung. Gold members include AMD, China Mobile, Cisco, Google, Hitachi, Huawei, Motorola and several others. A much larger list of Silver members includes Adobe, Broadcom, Canonical, D-Link, Dell and so on. Where Valve and the HSA Foundation will fit into this tier system is currently unknown.

The Linux Foundation is a nonprofit consortium dedicated to the growth of Linux and collaborative software development. The organization was founded back in 2000 and sponsors the work of Linux creator Linus Torvalds. The organization also promotes, protects and advances the Linux operating system and collaborative software development by marshaling the resources of its members and the open source community.

"Our membership continues to grow as both new and mature entities embrace community development and open technologies," said Mike Woster, chief operating officer, The Linux Foundation. "Our new members believe Linux is a strategic investment that allows their markets to evolve as quickly as possible to achieve long-term viability and competitiveness."

Valve introduced SteamOS back in September. The new operating system is designed for the TV and the living room, and will be made available to download for free. Valve said that although the company previously worked on bringing Steam to the living room with elements such as Big Picture, the only way to offer the best environment would be to simply develop an entire operating system.

For more information about the Linux Foundation, head here.

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  • 11 Hide
    onedos , December 4, 2013 8:27 PM
    I hope linux explodes and is one everyone's desktop.
Other Comments
  • 8 Hide
    Jgriff , December 4, 2013 8:17 PM
    there has been no viable pc gaming alternative other than windows, until now...finally someone did something about it, cant wait to leave windows...ever since bill gates stepped down as chaiman microsoft has went to sheet
  • 11 Hide
    onedos , December 4, 2013 8:27 PM
    I hope linux explodes and is one everyone's desktop.
  • 1 Hide
    southernshark , December 4, 2013 8:36 PM
    This is pretty exciting. I was a bit pessimistic about Steam OS at first, but if it develops into a full blown Linux OS with all of the options that brings with it, then it is quite exciting. Microsoft has been firing on three cylinders the past few years so the timing of this is quite fortunate.
  • 1 Hide
    vmem , December 4, 2013 8:38 PM
    hmm, this is VERY interesting. Microsoft has some major work to do or more and more software developers are going to jump on the Linux boat.

    Will definately be keeping an eye on it
  • 5 Hide
    vmem , December 4, 2013 8:42 PM
    Quote:
    This is pretty exciting. I was a bit pessimistic about Steam OS at first, but if it develops into a full blown Linux OS with all of the options that brings with it, then it is quite exciting. Microsoft has been firing on three cylinders the past few years so the timing of this is quite fortunate.


    I have to partially disagree with this. I think Steam OS should be a gaming only highly optimized platform, and Steam should exist alternatively as a part of a large Linux based OS developed by the Foundation.

    This is because there are a lot of professional software out there that still lack proper Linux support (or a linux version at all). examples would be autodesk and Adobe. until proper alternatives can be found, professional gamers like myself will keep AT LEAST ONE high-powered PC for content creation etc. dual-booting into Steam OS would only be attractive as a highly optimized gaming platform, as I can't get that much work done on Linux atm...
  • 1 Hide
    jhansonxi , December 4, 2013 9:27 PM
    Quote:

    This is because there are a lot of professional software out there that still lack proper Linux support (or a linux version at all). examples would be autodesk and Adobe. until proper alternatives can be found, professional gamers like myself will keep AT LEAST ONE high-powered PC for content creation etc. dual-booting into Steam OS would only be attractive as a highly optimized gaming platform, as I can't get that much work done on Linux atm...


    If by "AutoDesk" you mean AutoCAD, try DraftSight from Dassault Systèmes, the same developer as Solidworks and Catia.
  • -1 Hide
    vmem , December 4, 2013 10:38 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:

    This is because there are a lot of professional software out there that still lack proper Linux support (or a linux version at all). examples would be autodesk and Adobe. until proper alternatives can be found, professional gamers like myself will keep AT LEAST ONE high-powered PC for content creation etc. dual-booting into Steam OS would only be attractive as a highly optimized gaming platform, as I can't get that much work done on Linux atm...


    If by "AutoDesk" you mean AutoCAD, try DraftSight from Dassault Systèmes, the same developer as Solidworks and Catia.


    I meant Maya. and I guess I should specify that the problem isn't that I can't personally find an alternative, but rather Windows is very much entrenched in the enterprise and will easily take a decade or more to remove. until then, anyone working for one of these enterprises will do well to keep at least one Windows based system. which leaves Linux only for 'side jobs' (read running that NAS), 'personal tasks', or entertainment.
  • 2 Hide
    southernshark , December 4, 2013 11:24 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    This is pretty exciting. I was a bit pessimistic about Steam OS at first, but if it develops into a full blown Linux OS with all of the options that brings with it, then it is quite exciting. Microsoft has been firing on three cylinders the past few years so the timing of this is quite fortunate.


    I have to partially disagree with this. I think Steam OS should be a gaming only highly optimized platform, and Steam should exist alternatively as a part of a large Linux based OS developed by the Foundation.

    This is because there are a lot of professional software out there that still lack proper Linux support (or a linux version at all). examples would be autodesk and Adobe. until proper alternatives can be found, professional gamers like myself will keep AT LEAST ONE high-powered PC for content creation etc. dual-booting into Steam OS would only be attractive as a highly optimized gaming platform, as I can't get that much work done on Linux atm...



    I just don't see the downside in putting a full OS on it. Obviously Linux is on there or you couldn't game on it. So they might as well open up the other uses for it. Personally, I wouldn't want to devote a computer to just gaming and don't really want to dual boot either. It seems dumb to me to dual boot, with one version of linux being gaming only and then to switch to a full linux.... I don't see how that would make sense.

    I get that a lot of people will still have a Windows machine. But a lot of people won't. Take me for example, I only use my computer for gaming, writing, surfing the net, watching videos, preparing presentations etc.... I don't actually need Windows to do that. About the only MS program that I would miss is Power Point, but there are viable alternatives to it out there.

  • 1 Hide
    itchyisvegeta , December 5, 2013 1:18 AM
    All because Windows 8 sucks!
  • 2 Hide
    ZolaIII , December 5, 2013 2:54 AM
    Maya is present on Linux & IBMs software is present to!

    What ever Valve stripe down from mainline Linux you will be able to put back in because its open source OS & even more than that! Just like it's done on Android (with costume kernels) .
  • -1 Hide
    General Techniq , December 5, 2013 4:06 AM
    Why Steam Box Failed:
    (by General Techniq, 2016)


    1. Too expensive for console gamers, too restrictive for hardcore PC gamers.

    2. Performance issues. If console gamers can be annoyed by underperforming, buggy, game systems... If PC gamers can go ballistic when their games crash or are too demanding for their systems to run successfully.... then Steam Box users go lynch mob or stake burning when their Steam Boxes have issues with "steam" games.

    3. The shameless suggestion of infinite upgradability. Lies such as these only work once on a consumer collective. Afterwards, the only hope for continued success on the same front for a particular goods provider would be to launch a "new and improved" model with the promise (suggested only) that it will be everything that the previous model was not.

    4. Linux.

    5. Logistics, consumer support, quality, presence, promotion, reception....... Welcome to the world of electronic hardware entertainment, Valve. Feel free to take your freshman spanking with a grain of salt. (By the way, if you're looking for a recent example of how bad this can get for you, go research "original xbox - japan"

    6. Games. No matter what, if your system can't sell games that were specifically developed/ported just for it (Linux), the developers won't be able to humor your aspirations of global dominance for long before the top execs start having to answer to the shareholders. (see; Wii, Wii-U)

    7. Sure, it plays games....... but what else can it do? Does it does anything better than it's competitors? Anything? Why buy steam box instead of PC?

  • 1 Hide
    Jordan Nwokolo , December 5, 2013 4:43 AM
    So, Who is MS Windows Replacement ?? Ubuntu,Steam OS or Mint ?? :D 
  • 2 Hide
    vir_cotto , December 5, 2013 6:27 AM
    Awesome I've been waiting for an alternative to Windows for a long time XD, hope this works out!
  • 2 Hide
    frelled , December 5, 2013 6:48 AM
    Lots of Windows/MS fans downgrading the pro Linux comments. Anyone else notice that?
  • 1 Hide
    JD88 , December 5, 2013 7:07 AM
    Quote:
    Lots of Windows/MS fans downgrading the pro Linux comments. Anyone else notice that?


    Toms has a very pro-Microsoft audiance, probably because a lot of it's readers work in IT with Windows based machines and that's where their knowledge (and job skills) are. Also, Windows is what most people use NOW so naturally they defend what they have and the products they use etc.

    Rarely do you get any sort of discussion on the actual advantages/disadvantages of Windows vs Linux because all anyone ever cites is software compatibility which has nothing to do with the effectiveness and design of the OS itself, but everything to do with Microsoft's near monopoly on the PC sector for decades.

    Additionally, most people have never tried Linux or if they have don't look at it with any sort of open mind.
  • 1 Hide
    Lee-m , December 5, 2013 7:24 AM
    People tend to go where the software is. In the case of games thats always going to be the big AAA games. A good indie catalog is a nice bonus.

    As JD88 just pointed out, most folks on toms are mainly windows users, my self included. I also quite like Linux, but I just don't see it as a platform that will ever overcome its dependency on config file editing and use of a shell/terminal interface. Its cool if your a power user, but not for the average joe.

    I hope valve have a good game plan and can challenge windows and even the consoles. I think even most of the hardcore windows users want to see some alternative to that god awful windows 8/metro UI microsoft seem to think forcing on the desktop user is some how a good idea.
  • 1 Hide
    stevejnb , December 5, 2013 9:25 AM
    It still utterly amazes me. In one breath, Toms bashes anything that operates on a "walled garden" type format. In the next breath, they are rushing in, eyes closed and wallets open, to embrace an OS that is being built around the one-company-controlled software distributor Steam.
  • -1 Hide
    clonazepam , December 5, 2013 9:26 AM
    This is not an alternative to anything. It's an add-on, at best. You just have to look at the money to see it won't go anywhere. It costs money to make games run in Linux. If you don't have enough people buying it, you won't make your money back, or so little profit, that it was never worth doing. Look at it this way, if you have a team of people, you can commit their time to making dimes on a linux platform, or have them use that time to make dollars elsewhere. Given the choice, which would you choose?

    Look at all those big names in the Foundation. The Foundation's been around since 2000. What have they done so far? Why would you think the inclusion of Valve / Steam OS would suddenly make some huge impact?

    Who's dumping real money into open source compilers, making them competitive?

    At the end of the day, the 'suits' will see market share and say 'nah'. Who's going to put up the marketing dollars? It's too expensive and the guarantee of a return on that investment? There isn't one.

    I'd love to see Microsoft see some real competition. There's so many layers to this onion, and the OS is just one. It costs too much to peel every layer, make brand new layers, and then piece it all back together. You're literally counting on a bunch of companies, from all angles, to throw a ton of money into a pit, and make a wish. I'm sorry.
  • 1 Hide
    JD88 , December 5, 2013 9:35 AM
    Quote:
    It still utterly amazes me. In one breath, Toms bashes anything that operates on a "walled garden" type format. In the next breath, they are rushing in, eyes closed and wallets open, to embrace an OS that is being built around the one-company-controlled software distributor Steam.


    Steam OS is open source and much more open than something like the Xbox.

    According to Tweaktown:

    "Steam is not a one-way content broadcast channel, it's a collaborative many-to-many entertainment platform, in which each participant is a multiplier of the experience for everyone else," Valve stated. "With SteamOS, 'openness' means that the hardware industry can iterate in the living room at a much faster pace than they've been able to. Content creators can connect directly to their customers. Users can alter or replace any part of the software or hardware they want. Gamers are empowered to join in the creation of the games they love. SteamOS will continue to evolve, but will remain an environment designed to foster these kinds of innovation."

    Read more at http://www.tweaktown.com/news/33081/valve-unveils-steamos-an-open-source-free-os-for-the-living-room/index.html#UaCmG8XWgAM3PdIH.99
  • 0 Hide
    JD88 , December 5, 2013 9:45 AM
    Quote:
    This is not an alternative to anything. It's an add-on, at best. You just have to look at the money to see it won't go anywhere. It costs money to make games run in Linux. If you don't have enough people buying it, you won't make your money back, or so little profit, that it was never worth doing. Look at it this way, if you have a team of people, you can commit their time to making dimes on a linux platform, or have them use that time to make dollars elsewhere. Given the choice, which would you choose?

    Look at all those big names in the Foundation. The Foundation's been around since 2000. What have they done so far? Why would you think the inclusion of Valve / Steam OS would suddenly make some huge impact?

    Who's dumping real money into open source compilers, making them competitive?

    At the end of the day, the 'suits' will see market share and say 'nah'. Who's going to put up the marketing dollars? It's too expensive and the guarantee of a return on that investment? There isn't one.

    I'd love to see Microsoft see some real competition. There's so many layers to this onion, and the OS is just one. It costs too much to peel every layer, make brand new layers, and then piece it all back together. You're literally counting on a bunch of companies, from all angles, to throw a ton of money into a pit, and make a wish. I'm sorry.


    The same could have been said for the release of any console or even something like Android and look where it is. The costs of porting games to Linux really isn't that great, especially now that everything is architecturally similar.
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