AIO DRN-STN Review: A Gaming All-In-One With A 120 Hz Display

Thermal And Acoustic Test Results

Thanks to its eight-fan cross-flow configuration, AIO Corporation’s DRN-STN facilitates lower temperatures than the top three performers from our eleven-way gaming case round-up. CPU temperatures appear especially low, and part of the credit for that is likely due to the way the unrestricted top intake and top exhaust fans align with the intake and exhaust sides of our CPU cooler (unlike the variation of this idea used in ASRock’s M8).

Finding a noisier angle from which to test the DRN-STN is certainly possible, but not practical since you're going to sit directly in front of this system's screen. Typically, the same is not true of mid-tower cases, so those get tested at an appropriate 45° angle.

AIO’s implementation of a double-walled plastic housing outside of its ATX case is surely worth some mention as well, since it does a splendid job reducing high-pitched fan whine. The graphics card vent still blows almost directly out the right side of the DRN-STN.

This platform presents two faces in high-speed fan mode, becoming the second-noisiest configuration when internal components are idle and the quietest when those components are fully loaded. That means it does the best job of isolating you from the noise of internal components, even though the noise of its own fans is fairly pronounced.

The DRN-STN is consistently the quietest when set to low-speed fan mode, but that setting significantly raises GPU temperature. It’s nice, then, that manual fan controls are located right in front of you, on the screen frame.

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  • 749236 said:
    What does this retro looking gaming box have over an established gaming notebook say an Alienware or Asus? Thanks for the choice though.
    Up to 20x the graphics power and 2x the CPU performance? I guess it depends on what you plan to do with all that extra space.

    I also didn't get a chance to note in the article that "Full Sized" power supply means PS/2 form factor (and extended versions thereof). ATX power standard does not include a form factor, because form factors designate "form". This is, in spite of what Yahoo Answers might tell you. So "Full ATX" is a misnomer concerning power supplies.
    15
  • Other Comments
  • What does this retro looking gaming box have over an established gaming notebook say an Alienware or Asus? Thanks for the choice though.
    -11
  • 749236 said:
    What does this retro looking gaming box have over an established gaming notebook say an Alienware or Asus? Thanks for the choice though.
    Up to 20x the graphics power and 2x the CPU performance? I guess it depends on what you plan to do with all that extra space.

    I also didn't get a chance to note in the article that "Full Sized" power supply means PS/2 form factor (and extended versions thereof). ATX power standard does not include a form factor, because form factors designate "form". This is, in spite of what Yahoo Answers might tell you. So "Full ATX" is a misnomer concerning power supplies.
    15
  • This is just a stupid and ugly..
    -5
  • The internal case appears to be made by NZXT. The 3.5" rails and the PCI toolless latch are exactly the same as my NZXT case from 2005.
    0
  • 369586 said:
    The internal case appears to be made by NZXT. The 3.5" rails and the PCI toolless latch are exactly the same as my NZXT case from 2005.
    NZXT doesn't manufacture its own cases though, or at least it didn't in 2005 :)
    1
  • I'd give it 2 foldout screens for eyefinity.
    4
  • reminds me of fallout
    1
  • wow,..$700 for a case, and people are complaining about a $700 video card? WTF are people smoking these days?
    0
  • Is it oversimplification to say that the system looks like a monitor and a case held together by a shroud? I agree with Trutherizer, especially at that price, but, to go a little bit further, it needs a docking station for a keyboard and mouse.
    0
  • Because hauling what seems to be a CRT monitor makes you a more popular guy.
    0
  • Quote:What does this retro looking gaming box have over an established gaming notebook say an Alienware or Asus? Thanks for the choice though.Up to 20x the graphics power and 2x the CPU performance? I guess it depends on what you plan to do with all that extra space.I also didn't get a chance to note in the article that "Full Sized" power supply means PS/2 form factor (and extended versions thereof). ATX power standard does not include a form factor, because form factors designate "form". This is, in spite of what Yahoo Answers might tell you. So "Full ATX" is a misnomer concerning power supplies.> I seriously doubt 20x graphics and 2x cpu power.I saw no 3dMark11 numbers, just that they were intending to test it.My M18xR2, can get 11,500 3DMark11.I have dual RAID 250GB Evo's, i7 Extreme @ 4.6GHz, 16GB RAM CAS9 @25,500GB/s throughput, and I too can upgrade my GPUs also, unlike some laptops.32lbs?Mine is 11.8lbs. Good luck with your carry-on at the check-in desk.
    -2
  • I really do not see this selling well or have a market segment.
    0
  • Is a built-in TV tuner necessary? The other PCI-E slots could be for SB-ZxR.
    0
  • Honestly I liked the design!
    3
  • Quote:
    What does this retro looking gaming box have over an established gaming notebook say an Alienware or Asus? Thanks for the choice though.
    The fact that you can stick desktop parts in it, and build a high end PC at half the price of an alienware or asus gaming notebook? Use your brain for a second... the best alienware notebook comes with an 18" screen, one or two GTX 780m cards (witch are about half the power of a desktop GTX 780) and are NOT easily upgradeable. Notebook graphics and CPUs are 2-4 times more expensive then desktop counterparts, and half the performance. Also, I personally find laptop gaming very uncomfortable. Screens are too small, keyboard is too close to the screen, screen is too low, I have to keep looking down witch is very uncomfortable after a few hours... I've been waiting for something like this for a while now. Sure, they could have made it smaller... a micro-ATX or even micro-ITX mainboard would have been enough... a built in closed loop water cooling system for the CPU, and a PCI-E riser for the GPU would have made it a lot more compact.
    3
  • I also love the retro military/industrial design. I just wish some manufacturer would come up with a standardized AIO enclosure with a 24 or 27" screen, small form factor mainboard, closed loop watercooler for the CPU, GPU mountable next to the maiboard using a riser card, and a battery that would provide about 1 hour of usage in windows desktop for a 300-450w cfg. Basically, I want a laptop with no keyboard or touchpad that I can upgrade using widely available desktop parts... The only portability I need is the ability to carry the thing with me and easily set it up at a hotel or a friends house, without the hassle of carrying two separate units (display and computer) + cables...
    2
  • Make it half as thick and WAYYYYY more attractive, and I could see this being an awesome option...
    -1
  • I thought they stopped making such low color panels.
    -3
  • Yea, no thanks. Thing looks like it belongs in some bad 1990's sci-fi movie.
    -1
  • Same panel as the VG248QE? So it can use a G-Sync module, then. Which would be great if I wanted flawless gaming in what looks like a giant Panasonic Toughbook. This would be great for gaming in the back of a HUM-V.
    1