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Phenom II X6: A Family Of Two

AMD Phenom II X6 1090T And 890FX Platform Review: Hello, Leo
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AMD is launching two Phenom II X6 processors: the 1090T and 1055T.

Both models are architecturally identical. That is to say they’re monolithic hexa-core designs with 128KB L1 cache per core (64KB instruction and 64KB data), 512KB of L2 cache per core, and a shared 6MB L3 cache.

This is, of course, a different approach than Intel’s. With its six-core Gulftown design, Intel increased the size of its shared L3 in order to maintain what its architects considered an optimal ratio between cores and cache. Because AMD isn’t also shifting to a smaller manufacturing process, it really can’t follow suit and keep the Phenom II economically viable at the same time. But as we’ll see in the benchmarks, simply increasing core count is enough to give the X6 a significant boost in threaded apps.

As I mentioned in my Phenom II X6 preview, AMD is sticking with its 45 nm process here. As a result, die size increases from 258 square millimeters to 346. And while AMD is hesitant to divulge official transistor counts, it admits that its Thuban design is closely related to existing hexa-core Istanbul-based Opteron CPUs. From that, we can safely assume the count lands around 904 million, up from approximately 758 million. That’s not as large an increase as Intel’s six-core design because Gulftown’s L3 is transistor-heavy. So, you can argue that AMD is getting the best return in performance for the added complexity. But while Intel was able to fit its 6-core/12MB L3 design into a smaller piece of silicon than the quad-core model that came before, AMD’s 346 mm² die represents a fairly large increase.

Though AMD won’t comment directly, we know through a handful of motherboard vendors that there will be Thuban-based quad-core CPUs following in the wake of the 1090T and 1055T. They’ll likely be armed with Turbo CORE as well, and apparently it’ll be possible for certain lucky buyers to unlock the two disabled cores. I don’t get excited about core unlocking for two reasons, though. First, it’s chance-based—you can’t tell if the processor you buy had cores turned off due to defect or simply to meet demand. Second, AMD’s price structure is so tightly packed that it makes the most sense to buy the CPU you want/need right off the bat, rather than roll the (wait for it)…dice.


Clock Frequency
Price
HT Speed
Lith. Node
Total L2 Cache
Shared L3 Cache
TDP
Voltage
Max. Temp.
Phenom II X6 1090T
3.2 GHz (3.6 GHz with Turbo)
$295
4 GT/s
45 nm SOI
3MB
6MB
125W
1.125-1.4V
62 C
Phenom II X6 1055T
2.8 GHz (3.3 GHz with Turbo)
$199
4 GT/s
45 nm SOI
3MB
6MB
125W
1.125-1.4V
62 C
Phenom II X4 965 Black Edition
3.4 GHz
$185
4 GT/s
45 nm SOI
2MB
6MB
125W (w/ rev. C3)
.825-1.4V
62 C


New Tech, New Names

In a world where every piece of technology-turned-marketing needs to be rolled into the name somehow, AMD follows in Intel’s footsteps by tacking another letter onto its product naming scheme.

Intel has the Core i7-980X, which, dissected, means absolutely nothing informative.

AMD now has its Phenom II X6 1090T and 1055T. At least the II is indicative of a second-generation Phenom family. The X6, of course, tells us that these processors are hexa-core—that’s fairly easy for most folks to figure out. The 1090 and 1055 are arbitrary performance indicators, and the T tells you these CPUs are Turbo CORE-enabled.

The 1090T runs at 3.2 GHz by default (down from the Phenom II X4 965’s 3.4 GHz). When Turbo CORE is active, it can hit speeds of up to 3.6 GHz, though as our experimentation on the next page shows, this isn’t something  seen on a regular basis. It sports a 2 GHz (4 GT/s) HyperTransport interconnect and is rated for a 125W TDP.

The 1055T operates at 2.8 GHz by default and runs at up to 3.2 GHz in Turbo CORE mode. It also boasts a 125W TDP, along with the same HyperTransport connection able to move up to 16 GB/s bidirectionally.

Both CPUs sport the same DDR2/DDR3-capable memory controller rated for DDR2-1066 and DDR3-1333 (officially). Performance-oriented memory modules listed in AMD's online database can be pushed at up to DDR3-1600, though, and simultaneously force lower latencies and overclocked northbridge freq./voltage settings.

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  • 29 Hide
    englandr753 , April 27, 2010 4:18 AM
    Being that I have seemed to changed my use of my pc more toward video editing than gaming I am definitely selling off my Q9550 and going with the AMD X6. I still game some but don't care to have the cutting edge video card atm so this is perfect for me. I'm buying from AMD for my next cpu! Way to go AMD! I still have another Q9550 system so don't think I'm an AMD fan boy but I do love it when AMD gives such a great value for such a great product. Everyone should...
  • 24 Hide
    jemlinus , April 27, 2010 4:35 AM
    Great. Six cores for under $200, and I don't have to change my mobo and memory cards. Can't go wrong with that!
  • 20 Hide
    Doltron , April 27, 2010 4:45 AM
    I think you should add Bad Company 2 to the benchmarks. ;) 
Other Comments
  • 9 Hide
    dwave , April 27, 2010 4:12 AM
    My 4 core Core2Quad @ 2.83 is still working everything great, so I won't be upgrading. Nice to see the price for 6 cores is very reasonable though!
  • 13 Hide
    eugenester , April 27, 2010 4:16 AM
    Finally this article comes out. I've been waiting since the morning for this. Lol but anyway, good read.
  • 2 Hide
    cangelini , April 27, 2010 4:17 AM
    Got some GTX 480 numbers in there as well txt, and the results weren't much prettier.
  • 29 Hide
    englandr753 , April 27, 2010 4:18 AM
    Being that I have seemed to changed my use of my pc more toward video editing than gaming I am definitely selling off my Q9550 and going with the AMD X6. I still game some but don't care to have the cutting edge video card atm so this is perfect for me. I'm buying from AMD for my next cpu! Way to go AMD! I still have another Q9550 system so don't think I'm an AMD fan boy but I do love it when AMD gives such a great value for such a great product. Everyone should...
  • 19 Hide
    englandr753 , April 27, 2010 4:26 AM
    Is the X6 1090T not oc'able at all? It would seem there should be some headroom for overclock to some degree. Starting out at 3.2g makes me think you should be able to get fairly close to 4.0.
  • 4 Hide
    cangelini , April 27, 2010 4:31 AM
    englandr753Is the X6 1090T not oc'able at all? It would seem there should be some headroom for overclock to some degree. Starting out at 3.2g makes me think you should be able to get fairly close to 4.0.


    I was able to hit 3.7 with Turbo CORE enabled fairly easily. It might go higher, but I'd argue this probably isn't as much of an overclocking chip as a 965 might be.
  • 24 Hide
    jemlinus , April 27, 2010 4:35 AM
    Great. Six cores for under $200, and I don't have to change my mobo and memory cards. Can't go wrong with that!
  • 1 Hide
    bk420 , April 27, 2010 4:36 AM
    Where can I sign up to buy this thing NOW. It looks good considering the price. 6 cores is better than 4 IMHO.
  • 20 Hide
    dstln , April 27, 2010 4:38 AM
    Good to hear they're getting back into the performance market and still focusing on value.
  • 9 Hide
    deividast , April 27, 2010 4:42 AM
    jemlinusGreat. Six cores for under $200, and I don't have to change my mobo and memory cards. Can't go wrong with that!


    Actually it's under 300$, but still really affordable :)  to bad i'd have to change my mobo and ram for it :)  so i'll stick to my 4 cores for the time being :D 
  • 0 Hide
    englandr753 , April 27, 2010 4:43 AM
    So, my understanding the only ocing you can do is with turbocore? 2 cores or less are working to hit the 3.7? If this is so, this is a little disappointing but as I said for video editing, 6 cores even at 3.2 sounds sweet to me. Thanks for the review and the replies! Nice job!
  • 4 Hide
    pharge , April 27, 2010 4:43 AM
    I remember we did have few articles here talking about what happen when there are multiple programs running at the same time (which I belive is closer to the reality). Will 6-core system look better when there are 2-3 program running at the same time?
    Like playing games while having handbreak and antivirus running at the same time.
  • 20 Hide
    Doltron , April 27, 2010 4:45 AM
    I think you should add Bad Company 2 to the benchmarks. ;) 
  • -7 Hide
    englandr753 , April 27, 2010 4:47 AM
    DoltronI think you should add Bad Company 2 to the benchmarks.


    I can see why you would but do you realize the time this would take to do everyones favorite game? Not a reasonable thing to do...
  • 5 Hide
    jemlinus , April 27, 2010 4:48 AM
    deividastActually it's under 300$, but still really affordable to bad i'd have to change my mobo and ram for it so i'll stick to my 4 cores for the time being

    I was talking about 1055T. ;) 
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