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AOC G2460PQU 24-inch 144 Hz Gaming Monitor Review

AOC G2460PQU 24-inch 144 Hz Gaming Monitor Review
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Not many monitors can run at 144 Hz, but AOC is adding to your list of choices with its G2460PQU 24-inch TN-based screen. We’ve already tested similar displays from Asus and BenQ. Can AOC match their speed and performance at a roughly $250 price point?

Already, 2014 has proven to be a great year for gamers. Beyond the fast, efficient CPUs, amazingly powerful graphics configurations, and gorgeous 4K displays, we're seeing more monitors with high refresh rates for gaming, along with technologies like Nvidia's G-Sync. As new capabilities are added and specification sheets grow to include the corresponding jargon, it's more important than ever to quantify what sets all of the options apart. We've received a ton of reader requests for more gaming monitor coverage, so we're sharpening our focus on that genre.

By now, it's commonly accepted that high refresh rates are a key ingredient in a monitor able to anchor the most fully-loaded gaming rigs. When you spend four figures on graphics cards alone, you don't want to flip on v-sync and get stuck at 60 Hz. That'd be like trying to drive a Ferrari in Manhattan.

Displays capable of running at 144 Hz are fairly rare in the PC world. However, we just received our third example from AOC, the brand-new G2460PQU. We’ve mentioned before that many HDTVs run at 120 and even 240 Hz, and many of you have wondered why the same is not true for monitors. The distinction is that HDTVs cannot accept a signal faster than 60 Hz. For the most performance-sensitive games, you want a display that can actually process a 144 Hz signal, and that just doesn’t exist in the realm of television.

Panel Type
TN Film
Backlight
W-LED, edge array
Screen Size
24-inch
Max Resolution
1920x1080
Max Refresh Rate
144 Hz
Aspect Ratio
16:9
Native Color Depth
8-bit (6-bit w/FRC)
Native Gamut
sRGB
Response Time (GTG)
1 ms
Brightness
350 cd/m2
Speakers
2 x 2 W
VGA
1
DVI
1
DisplayPort 1.2
1
HDMI 1.4
1
Audio In, 3.5 mm
1
Headphone
1
USB v2.0
1 up, 4 down
Media Card Reader
-
Panel Dimensions
W x H x D
22.3 x 15.5 x 9.6 in
566 x 394 x 244 mm
Panel Thickness
2 inches / 51 mm
Bezel Width
0.6-1 inched / 15-25 mm
Weight
13.9 lbs / 6.3 kg
Warranty
Three Years

If you read our reviews of the BenQ XL2720Z  (a 27-inch screen for $450) and Asus VG248QE (a 24-inch display priced at $270), this screen's specs will look pretty familiar. It is unfortunate that manufacturers still have to rely on a 6-bit/FRC TN panel to run at rates higher than 60 Hz. But for now, that is another universally accepted constant. Overlord Computer is attempting to buck the trend with its IPS-based Tempest X270OC, which we expect to review very soon. But a monitor like that is the exception, not the rule.

The principal hurdle to moving pixels at a high rate is bandwidth. A TN part has a much easier time dealing with 120 or 144 Hz refresh rates because its processing demand is much lower than that of an 8-bit IPS display. We’ve seen enough examples to say that image quality is not noticeably impacted by the reduced bit depth. Frame Rate Conversion continues to be an effective means of rendering 8-bit color with a 6-bit native LCD panel.

While the G2460PQU is new to gamers in the U.S., it’s been available abroad for several months. Comparisons to the Asus and BenQ 144 Hz displays are inevitable. The base specs are nearly identical. But there is one feature AOC doesn’t offer, and that’s any sort of motion blur reduction.

We talked quite a bit about BenQ’s Blur Reduction, which strobes the backlight between frames and can help reduce or eliminate motion blur at the expense of light output. Asus’ VG248QE does the same thing if you connect it to an Nvidia LightBoost-enabled graphics board. AOC, however, does not offer a comparable capability. Is this a potential deal-breaker? We’ll go into more depth about the implications on page nine, after our response and lag tests.

Aside from that one omission, the G2460PQU's specs suggest that it's a well-made gaming-oriented screen with the sort of performance attributes discerning enthusiasts are looking for. Let's see if those figures bear out in practice.

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  • 5 Hide
    PandaV4 , July 10, 2014 1:57 AM
    I have a AOC G2460P monitor myself, and a unpleasant surprise was that refresh rate of 144 Hz wasn't supported if using the DisplayPort connection. Does G2460PQU have the same limitations, or does it actually support 144 Hz over DisplayPort?
  • 7 Hide
    PandaV4 , July 10, 2014 2:15 AM
    After some googling it seems that G2460PQU and G2460P is the same model. So beware if you want to use Displayport you wont be able to use the 144 Hz setting too! And this doesn't have any blur reduction either! It seems there is actually a new updated model to be released this month the AOC G2460PG. And it has nvidia g-sync support and blur reduction, and supports 144 over dIsplayport.
    TL;DR: G2460PQU = DO NOT BUY, G2460PG = BUY.
  • 0 Hide
    ubercake , July 10, 2014 4:12 AM
    Good review. Thanks.

    A typo:
    Bezel width: 0.6-1 inched / 15-25 mm
  • 1 Hide
    ceberle , July 10, 2014 5:10 AM
    Quote:
    I have a AOC G2460P monitor myself, and a unpleasant surprise was that refresh rate of 144 Hz wasn't supported if using the DisplayPort connection. Does G2460PQU have the same limitations, or does it actually support 144 Hz over DisplayPort?


    The PQU does accept 144 Hz over DisplayPort.

    -Christian-
  • 3 Hide
    PandaV4 , July 10, 2014 5:24 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    I have a AOC G2460P monitor myself, and a unpleasant surprise was that refresh rate of 144 Hz wasn't supported if using the DisplayPort connection. Does G2460PQU have the same limitations, or does it actually support 144 Hz over DisplayPort?


    The PQU does accept 144 Hz over DisplayPort.

    -Christian-

    A bit of googling brought up this article - http://pcmonitors.info/reviews/aoc-g2460pqu which says: " The image provided by DisplayPort is very similar on this monitor and it should also support the maximum (144Hz) refresh rate. Unfortunately that was not the case during our testing" and "The PC resolutions below this should feature 1920 x 1080 with 100Hz, 120Hz and 144Hz selectable – but that isn’t the case.". It seems there are different revisions of this monitor with the same model number. So if you buy one of those than you are practically gambling about the 144 Hz support.
  • 0 Hide
    npyrhone , July 10, 2014 6:11 AM
    Will we ever see here a review of even one non-TN gaming monitor? The reduced color depth renders to image quality absolutely disgusting.

    I will be the first one to congratulate you when you publish the next review of a monitor with a non-TN panel working over 60Hz.
  • -1 Hide
    rantoc , July 10, 2014 7:05 AM
    Yet another low res 1080p panel - Yawn!
  • -3 Hide
    3Dns , July 10, 2014 7:12 AM
    I have that model too and i buy it after a HP 23xi IPS LED Panel.
    I understand that.
    It doesnt worth 300€ for this model. All you need is 60hz and 24" Panel that you can take it with 120€. For me IPS Panels offer you way better colors so for me its better. Now if you want it for a GTX780 and above and you wanna play over 60FPS it may worth.
    But have in mind that a normal monitor cost ~120$ and this model cost double. You can spend that money in other hardware areas like better GPU for example.
  • 5 Hide
    Adroid , July 10, 2014 7:30 AM
    Sorry, but I won't ever buy another 1080p "gaming" display. 1920x1200 is vastly superior for "gaming" screens, and it's a shame the industry has veered away from it.

    I guess the thought process involves "and you can watch HD movies on it". Needless to say the 16:9 ratio is cheaper for manufacturers, and it's a great sales pitch. Well, give me a break. I got suckered into that line of thinking and I probably watched 2-3 movies on my "gaming" 23 inch monitor in 4-5 years.

    Let's keep the movies where they belong in the living room and re-focus "gaming" screens where they should have never left - in the 16:10 aspect ratio.
  • 3 Hide
    alchemy69 , July 10, 2014 8:35 AM
    If a game isn't enjoyable at 60Hz it isn't going to be enjoyable at 144Hz. And if it is enjoyable at 144, it still will be at 60. I've had some of the greatest fun over the last 30 years playing on tiny monitors, at low resolution and probably less than 30fps. I don't need the industry telling me what I need to have fun just so they can move more product.
  • 3 Hide
    moogleslam , July 10, 2014 8:57 AM
    With G-Sync monitors coming out now, technology like this already seems obsolete. Looking forward to an ASUS ROG Swift review.
  • 1 Hide
    PandaV4 , July 10, 2014 9:00 AM
    As i said before the AOC G2460PG coming this month has G-sync support too. There really is no sense in buying the model in this review.
  • 2 Hide
    ubercake , July 10, 2014 9:31 AM
    Quote:
    With G-Sync monitors coming out now, technology like this already seems obsolete. Looking forward to an ASUS ROG Swift review.


    I kind of agree, but if you don't have a G-sync capable GPU or don't want to throw the required funds at a G-sync monitor, these 144Hz monitors are the best options for gaming and they're far less expensive than G-sync monitors.
  • 2 Hide
    Adroid , July 10, 2014 1:14 PM
    Well my dream monitor is a 1920x1200 24" AH-IPS with G-sync, no ghosting, and extremely fast response times. I would be willing to shell out extra money for something like this, but quite honestly manufacturers may never make one, ever.
  • 3 Hide
    ceberle , July 10, 2014 1:40 PM
    Quote:
    Will we ever see here a review of even one non-TN gaming monitor? The reduced color depth renders to image quality absolutely disgusting.

    I will be the first one to congratulate you when you publish the next review of a monitor with a non-TN panel working over 60Hz.


    Yes. I just finished up testing of the Overlord Tempest X270OC. The article will publish soon. I'm also expecting a sample of the Asus PG278Q in the next few weeks. Please stay tuned!

    -Christian-
  • 0 Hide
    larsoncc , July 10, 2014 1:55 PM
    Does this support any 3d emitters and/or 3D Vision? Or is this one high refresh only, and not 3D?
  • 1 Hide
    ceberle , July 10, 2014 2:26 PM
    Quote:
    Does this support any 3d emitters and/or 3D Vision? Or is this one high refresh only, and not 3D?


    3D is not supported.

    -Christian-
  • 1 Hide
    JackNaylorPE , July 10, 2014 3:25 PM
    B to W ? No G to G ??????


    Quote:
    Well my dream monitor is a 1920x1200 24" AH-IPS with G-sync, no ghosting, and extremely fast response times. I would be willing to shell out extra money for something like this, but quite honestly manufacturers may never make one, ever.


    That should arrive right after the car that does 0 to 60 in 3.6 seconds, carries 9 people, gets 87 miles per gallon and is priced at $17,995 :) 
  • 1 Hide
    wtfxxxgp , July 11, 2014 12:51 AM
    I don't understand why people are complaining about "yet another 1080p TN monitor". This is still the more mainstream option for the greater majority of people out there. Toms has done a really good job of letting us know where it stands in comparison against its competitors. If it's not for you, then what is the point of bashing either THW or the manufacturer of the model that has been reviewed? Then sit back and wait for the review of the monitor that will eventually get your nod of approval, because I'll tell you right now - what most of you are "waiting for" will be DAMN EXPENSIVE.
  • 0 Hide
    Transsive , July 11, 2014 3:48 AM
    I love motion blur reduction (CRT-like strobbing). I have a lightboost2 monitor.
    But I hate the requirement of running 120fps at 120hz.
    Get any less than 120fps and the quality drops pretty noticeably (stuttering, double images). To the point where I prefer playing games like Civ 5 without motion blur reduction/strobbing.

    But G-Sync should remove the 120/144fps requirement, so I'm quite excited about that.
    Right now TN panels is where gaming is at, but hopefully not for much longer. I value motion clarity more than color accuracy and viewing angles.
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