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Planning For Steamroller, Short PCBs, And HTPCs

Tom's Hardware's AMA With Asus, In Its Entirety
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Q. It's extremely difficult to find blower-style GPU coolers in countries like Australia. Have you considered making reference Nvidia and blower style AMD cards?

A. Our focus is currently on non-reference design and providing superior cooling and acoustics. We want to ensure cool and quiet operation. A blower design generally cannot offer the efficiency need to offer both of these, it has to work much hardware and can be much louder as such we do not use them.

Q. What happened to HomeTheaterGate, will it return?

A. We are always looking at different options but as many users are now using their own media portals we no longer focus on development of HomeTheaterGate. There are number of other options like JRiverMediaCenter, Windows Media Center and XMBC and more than users enjoy with their media centric or HTPC systems. With that noted, we of course continue to evaluate how we can improve the total HTPC/Media Center experience on both hardware and software levels.

Q. Is there an Asus Rampage V Extreme and will it still be LGA 2011? What is the outlook on LGA vs BGA? Will you be forced to abandon the LGA socket and will this be just with Intel or both Intel and AMD?

A. Sorry cannot comment on potential or upcoming product. You will have to keep a watch out for what may come out. Currently we are committed to our Rampage Series Gene, Formula and Extreme. We are continually fine tuning and tweaking and improving performance, compatibility and overall usability via updates of the UEFI and software updates. In regards to any socket questions all we can communicate is that looking at our track record Asus and its motherboard division we are committed to performance and innovation and the flexibility that is offered in the PC DIY space. We are working to maintain this as much as possible and will continue working on boards focused at allowing the flexibility and features that interest enthusiasts.

Q. I just got a 660 GTX DCU 2 OC earlier this year, is the 760 that huge of a jump that I should upgrade?

A. The 660GTX is a very solid card, especially with the latest drivers and when used with the GeForce Experience software. Depending on your gameplay needs and the resolution you are playing this should dictate your upgrade path. The 760 will provide an increase in performance but depending on what you are playing currently and what you plan is for the next year or two you may want to consider all aspects first.

Q. Have you considered SKUs with shorter PCBs for SFF gaming PCs?

A. Yes you can see we have done this with the release of our GTX 670 DC mini which is specifically design for ultra-small chassis. We hope to offer more of these types of solutions especially as we offer an extensive range of motherboards in mATX and mini ITX.

Q. If Steamroller is released for socket AM3+, will your 880G-series motherboards support it?

A. This isn't something that we directly control. AGESA is usually optimized for the latest platform. Any signal line impedance shifts to cater for new DDR3 modules can have an impact in how well a newer processor will interact with an older chipset/platform. Newer boards will have been designed with those specifications in mind. DDR3 voltage requirements have changed considerably over the past few years as has module density and this changes trace requirements. So I cannot give you a firm answer on that. Hope the answer does help, though.

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  • 2 Hide
    Aoyagi , June 28, 2013 3:13 AM
    So I take it Asus is, in fact, not planning to broaden its AMD laptop selection since they didn't respond to the question about that. Unfortunate, I really liked the brand.
  • 0 Hide
    kennai , June 28, 2013 4:08 AM
    On page 8, the first answer is to the second question, and the second question is to the first answer. Was staring at that second answer for like 2 minutes being like, whaaaaat.
  • 0 Hide
    kennai , June 28, 2013 4:08 AM
    On page 8, the first answer is to the second question, and the second question is to the first answer. Was staring at that second answer for like 2 minutes being like, whaaaaat.
  • 2 Hide
    bim27142 , June 28, 2013 6:12 AM
    They didn't answer my question. :(  :(  :( 
  • 1 Hide
    Madn3ss795 , June 28, 2013 8:39 AM
    I was excited so see any sights of an ITX AMD board from Asus. Sadly all answers led to a big "NO".
  • 1 Hide
    slomo4sho , June 28, 2013 12:58 PM
    Sadly, Asus is too Intel focused to concern themselves with any innovating anything on their AMD lineup.
  • 1 Hide
    vmem , June 28, 2013 1:03 PM
    Quote:
    Sadly, Asus is too Intel focused to concern themselves with any innovating anything on their AMD lineup.


    ASUS is a business, and like any good business they're only concerned with MAKING MONEY. this is actually a GOOD THING, they have a clear goal and they know how to go about doing it: make good products that consumers want to buy.

    a huge part of making money and running a business is getting brand recognition, something AMD has been TERRIBLE at until recently. and ASUS made their point clear, they're not favoring Intel, their marketing research simply says there is insufficient demand. this is because when you walk into best-buy or even microcenter, at least 90% of the people shopping there still equate Intel with CPU. when that changes, ASUS will focus on AMD more. it's really that simple
  • 0 Hide
    vmem , June 28, 2013 1:05 PM
    Quote:
    Awesome info here... though I'm kinda bummed they had no info about pricing on that 39" 4k monitor. I'm drooling at the thought of acquiring one of those since it's using a cheap VA panel, assuming ASUS doesn't get greedy and charge a ton for it.

    Can't wait to be rid of this 1080p plague.


    I don't think it's a simple matter of greed. they can't price it TOO cheaply, or else their 31" 4K monitor with the nice Sharp panel won't sell. They have to price it appropriately for the quality and the market. if I were to venture a guess I'd say it'll be around $2-2.5K when it comes out.
  • -1 Hide
    lp231 , June 28, 2013 1:43 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    Awesome info here... though I'm kinda bummed they had no info about pricing on that 39" 4k monitor. I'm drooling at the thought of acquiring one of those since it's using a cheap VA panel, assuming ASUS doesn't get greedy and charge a ton for it.

    Can't wait to be rid of this 1080p plague.


    I don't think it's a simple matter of greed. they can't price it TOO cheaply, or else their 31" 4K monitor with the nice Sharp panel won't sell. They have to price it appropriately for the quality and the market. if I were to venture a guess I'd say it'll be around $2-2.5K when it comes out.


    From the web, the 31.5" will cost around $3799 to $4000. I expect the 39" to be close to $10,000.

  • 0 Hide
    slomo4sho , June 28, 2013 3:30 PM
    Quote:
    ASUS is a business, and like any good business they're only concerned with MAKING MONEY. this is actually a GOOD THING, they have a clear goal and they know how to go about doing it: make good products that consumers want to buy.

    a huge part of making money and running a business is getting brand recognition, something AMD has been TERRIBLE at until recently. and ASUS made their point clear, they're not favoring Intel, their marketing research simply says there is insufficient demand. this is because when you walk into best-buy or even microcenter, at least 90% of the people shopping there still equate Intel with CPU. when that changes, ASUS will focus on AMD more. it's really that simple


    AMD had nearly 50% market share in 2006 which has gradually dwindled to the current ~16-17% which is around a 10% drop from a year ago. The overreaching bias on tech sites over the years have fortified Intel's position as a monopoly over the CPU market and the lack of features such as PCIe 3.0 and Thunderbolt on AMD exemplifies the perception that AMD is inferior to Intel.

    The reality is that AMD has a clear advantage in integrated GPU solutions that would be optimal for small form factors but the lack of hardware and absence of media coverage perpetuates a fallacy that Intel provides the best solution for all computer needs.

    I, for one, will not be supporting Asus since ASRock and MSI continue to provide a much more balanced solutions on both platforms.
  • -3 Hide
    soundguruman , June 28, 2013 3:55 PM
    I would not buy an Asus product, if it were the only available product on earth.
    The quality control is a joke, and the customer support is even worse.
  • 1 Hide
    anything4this , June 28, 2013 6:27 PM
    Pretty sure I saw a $1000 46"/4k tv (unknown brand) about a week ago. Pretty good considering alternatives.

    Heres a $600 39" one: http://www.overclock.net/products/skyworth-39e780u-uhd-tv/reviews/6071 :D 
  • 0 Hide
    anything4this , June 28, 2013 8:12 PM
    Found the one i was speaking of: http://www.engadget.com/2013/06/25/seiki-launches-39-inch-4k-tv-for-699/

    39" as well, but from sears, so no agent/overseas shipping risk :)  (100+ extra though with better support i guess)
  • 1 Hide
    sonofliberty08 , June 30, 2013 1:10 PM
    comon...... the AMD base mini-ITX box are just like the next gen console ps4 & xbox one that will be in everyone living room, why can't ASUS sense it ? if ASUS keep absence on AMD platform i think i will switch to its brother ASROCK or its competitor MSI.
  • 0 Hide
    Sedare , July 1, 2013 8:31 AM
    Only thing I would have liked to see asked was how to get the Apple 27" Thunderbolt display working with a discrete card on their TB enabled mobos. I've not been able to find any information on this on their site.
  • 0 Hide
    danwat1234 , July 1, 2013 5:29 PM
    Didn't answer the meaty Asus G750 laptop questions, such as; Why use a soldered CPU that's not upgradeable when your competitors use the socketed version?
  • 0 Hide
    Roger Rogers , November 25, 2013 6:58 AM
    danwat1234 commented
    "Didn't answer the meaty Asus G750 laptop questions, such as; Why use a soldered CPU that's not upgradeable when your competitors use the socketed version?"
    .
    In response, could it be just that if they have it fixed in there is (A) less likelihood of warranty comeback (RMA`s) and (B) Windows 8.1 likes to stick around on one set of hardware and (C) The design can be simpler, and therefore cheaper for the consumer and (D) Asus can sell you an all round faster better equiped laptop in three years or so?