X58 On A Budget: Seven Sub-$200 Core i7 Boards

ECS X58B-A

The ECS X58B-A briefly dropped below $200 prior to today’s comparison, but is now found for around $220 online. We’re including it today since it was received and tested while still within budget limits, with hopes that it will once again drop below $200.

A quick look at its feature set shows that a second network controller is all that separates the X58B-A from a typical sub-$200 Core i7 motherboard, though by that standard two other contenders are above-average. Other enthusiast-oriented features, such as its two-digit Port 80 diagnostics display, onboard power/reset buttons, and I/O panel CLR_CMOS button are matched by several competing models.

ECS has done away with some of the legacy clutter still found on most motherboards, such as Ultra ATA and Floppy interfaces. Ultra ATA is no longer useful in new builds, and its removal saves both money and motherboard space, but floppies are still required in many XP installations for adding RAID drivers. It’s also worth noting that floppy interfaces are nearly cost-free, since the controller is still present through the motherboard’s multi-I/O IC.

Positioning of the X58 Express northbridge limits the X58B-A to six expansion slots, with an auxiliary power connector found where the uppermost expansion slot would have been. This allowed the CPU socket and DIMM slots to also be moved around half an inch farther from the top edge, though the only benefits we can think of are easier trace routing and added clearance between an oversized CPU cooler and top-mounted power supply.

The northbridge’s 36 PCIe 2.0 lanes are divided among two full-bandwith x16 slots and a single x4 slot, with three spaces separating the two x16 slots for improved graphics card airflow. Making the x4 slot more practical is room for full-length expansion cards, though ECS frustrates us by using a closed-end slot. Though not present, an open-ended x4 slot could have supported a x8 RAID card or a third graphics card in x4 mode.

Removing the Ultra ATA and floppy headers gave us less to complain about concerning X58B-A layout, though we’re still disappointed to se the front-panel audio connector in the bottom-rear corner. We should also note at least once in every comparison that forward-facing SATA ports can potentially be blocked by the lower drive cage of legacy case designs, though most ATX cases have already been updated to prevent any such issues.

BIOS

BIOS clock, timing, and voltage ranges can be found on Page 17’s overclocking comparison.

ECS’s X58B-A “M.I.B II” menu has a fairly short list of overclocking controls, and some are somewhat confusing. For example, increasing “Performance Level” can actually decrease CPU speed, as the “Ultra” option drops CPU multiplier to 12x and locks CPU Voltage at 1.25V.

In fact, changing the “Performance Level” setting is the only way to alter the CPU multiplier at all, and we were forced to use this setting to evaluate X58B-A FSB-overclocking capabilities.

A full set of DRAM ratios are also available, but altering them above DDR3-1333 requires manually increasing the Uncore Ratio to at least twice the DRAM Frequency setting. Furthermore, the motherboard is unbootable at DRAM ratios above the “1600” setting unless an “eXtreme Memory Profile” is chosen, and using one of those boosts the memory voltage to a CPU-risking 1.76V! The X58B-A is one of only two X58 motherboards we had to test at DDR3-1600, rather than the DDR3-1866 setting normally used in Core i7 motherboard roundups.

Accessories

The X58B-A supports both SLI and CrossFire, but we were surprised to find only a CrossFire bridge in the box. The reason for this surprise is that SLI-capable graphics cards rarely if ever include an SLI bridge, while CrossFire-cable graphics cards usually do.

Other surprises include a full set of six SATA cables and an eSATA cable. Most other manufacturers in this price class leave out a few cables to economize.

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56 comments
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  • midnightgun
    If I am not mistaken, the reason the Asus P6T SE is so cheap is because it does not support SLI, only supports Crossfire. Is that not correct?
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  • Crashman
    150684 said:
    If I am not mistaken, the reason the Asus P6T SE is so cheap is because it does not support SLI, only supports Crossfire. Is that not correct?


    At the time the review was written, the P6T SE web page read that it supported SLI. Perhaps Asus changed the web page following a complaint?

    The big difference between the P6T SE and the P6T is the missing Jmicron SATA multiplier. By removing it, Asus killed the pathway that went to it, leaving the JMB363 controller with a "dead port".
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  • midnightgun
    Perhaps. I have had my eye on this board since I started planning my eventual upgrade to i7/i5 architecture (MSI and Gigabyte as well). I know on ncix's forums (canada's equivalent to newegg in the states) the P6T SE had been listed as only crossfire since at least mid May.
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  • midnightgun
    Anywho, thanks for the review. Interesting read.
    2
  • Crashman
    midnightgunPerhaps. I have had my eye on this board since I started planning my eventual upgrade to i7/i5 architecture (MSI and Gigabyte as well). I know on ncix's forums (canada's equivalent to newegg in the states) the P6T SE had been listed as only crossfire since at least mid May.


    I never trust a seller as a source: Asus listed the P6T SE as having SLI support as little as four weeks ago, and now has a completely different page for it. They weren't the only company that advertised SLI capability and leave out the bridge, but it now appears the former P6T SE web page must have been an error, probably from the company copying its P6T page and editing it for the P6T SE, but missing one detail.
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  • anamaniac
    Personally I will (atleast attempting to now) head straight for the Foxconn Bloodrage with a i7 920 and 3 ddr3 1333 sticks (and give them good timings, ignoring bandwidth and attempting a lower voltage) and a 4870 1gb (due to them being quite cheap now). =D
    Though first on my priority list is a better monitor (and rent).

    Neat article regardless.
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  • ceteras
    What an inspiring name for the Foxconn mainboard... looks like it's a corporate culture thing.

    I've skipped the Foxconn page, wouldn't buy from them anyway.
    2
  • Onus
    Interesting read. If I were going to build an i7 rig for myself, that ASRock would probably be my choice. I'm not thrilled about the VRM heating up so much, but I only do low-moderate overclocks so it ought to be ok. The feature set of that board looks suitable.
    2
  • gxpbecker
    I am kinda surprised that the ECS board held its own against these "sronger" boards. From my past experieces ECS has been the walmart brand of mobos. :)
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  • Ryun
    Question: Is the Asrock board able to go into S3 state/Standby mode? The one board I got from Asrock would not and after emailing their tech support they responded by saying that their boards do not support S3 state.
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  • Aerobernardo
    This is just the perferct article for me. And the timing couldn't be any bette with i5 just sround the corner. As soon as it's reviews comes out, we will now be able to compare performance and price of i5's and i7's rigs.

    Thank you Tom's. Reminds me why this is my home page since 2001.
    1
  • Proximon
    That's a whole lot of work. I agree the ASRock is maybe too hot to be my first choice, but I can't quibble on the award. Good work.
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  • dman3k
    Tom's should take a stand and don't even feature any Foxconn products in any reviews.
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  • Anonymous
    I would like to disagree with all this talk about useless IDE connectors, I still use it for optical drives as it is still fast enough. Most systems only come with 6-8 SATA ports, why would i waste one on a crappy optical drive when i need them for faster HDDs.
    Give parallel ATA a break! it still has a valuable place on the mb!
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  • randomizer
    scott314159Give parallel ATA a break! it still has a valuable place on the mb!

    A very large valuable space mind you. Not to mention the air space ;)

    The X58 Pro-E doesn't seem to like S3 sleep. The power and HDD LEDs turn off but the fans are still going and I think the HDDs might be as well. I've made it turn off completely once, but then USB didn't work right once it woke, so I had to restart anyway.
    1
  • Kill@dor
    AerobernardoThis is just the perferct article for me. And the timing couldn't be any bette with i5 just sround the corner. As soon as it's reviews comes out, we will now be able to compare performance and price of i5's and i7's rigs.Thank you Tom's. Reminds me why this is my home page since 2001.


    I don't think there will be too much difference between the 2.
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  • Shadow703793
    ceterasWhat an inspiring name for the Foxconn mainboard... looks like it's a corporate culture thing.I've skipped the Foxconn page, wouldn't buy from them anyway.

    Agreed, the Foxconn boards are fine (actually quite good) for one time things on LN2 etc, but reliability for 24/7 is lacking.
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  • Shadow703793
    scott314159I would like to disagree with all this talk about useless IDE connectors, I still use it for optical drives as it is still fast enough. Most systems only come with 6-8 SATA ports, why would i waste one on a crappy optical drive when i need them for faster HDDs.Give parallel ATA a break! it still has a valuable place on the mb!

    Agreed. However, they should eliminate floppy, Parallel,MIDI/GAME ports.
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  • freak77power
    Better purchase then board with LGA1156 socket.
    -2
  • kaydee
    I've been using the MSI pro-e sli since the initial launch of this mobo. Anyhow, I've used both of the x58 pro and pro sli, and the northbridge temnperature IS a problem for both of the boards. When the PC full loaded (tried using prime, everast stability test) the NB temperature rises up to 114 degrees C. With a thermal paste and a small fan work, the temperature is lowered to 70 dC. at max, but still, it really concerns me. OC ability is at top notch. With air cooling, it is OCed at 3.2Ghz. (150Mhz) no problem what so ever. With the 3R system's prima boss 2 heatsink and enermax 120mm fan, the temperature is at 30 dC. under normal load, and 35 at max load.
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