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Results: Adobe CS6

Intel Core i7-4960X Review: Ivy Bridge-E, Benchmarked
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We use two distinct Photoshop benchmarks, one of which fully taxes each processor’s x86 cores using well-threaded filters, and another that is OpenCL-optimized to leverage graphics resources. Don’t compare the black and red bars above—they’re only together to save space (and your scrolling finger).

Core i7-4960X pretty much ties the Sandy Bridge-E-based -3970X in our CPU-based metric. You'd assume that Ivy Bridge-E would have an advantage, right? It turns out that we also discovered that Core i7-3770K wasn't any faster than -2700K in this test more than a year ago. On the other hand, all of Intel’s six-core CPUs outmaneuver the company’s quad-core offerings.

The OpenCL-accelerated metric is less consistent, seeming to favor architecture over core count or clock rate. For instance, the Haswell-based Core i7-4770K places first, followed by the Ivy Bridge-based Core i7-3770K and -4960X. Four- and six-core Sandy Bridge-based processors group up in a third clump, while AMD’s CPUs fall pretty far back.

The architectural benefit of adopting Ivy Bridge helps Intel’s Core i7-4960X claim a first-place finish, though nobody’s going to upgrade from Sandy Bridge-E for a 5% speed-up. A more demanding render project might create a larger delta between CPUs, and we’re working on sourcing a real-world project to test this theory.

After Effects is a special case where adding cores doesn’t always help performance as the available memory per core shrinks. That’s why you see the Core i7-3970X and -3930K in the middle of the chart. Between its 16 GB of DDR3-1600 and the Ivy Bridge architecture, though, Intel’s Core i7-4960X manages to tie the first-place -4770K.

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Top Comments
  • 37 Hide
    ingtar33 , July 16, 2013 10:35 PM
    about all i'd expect. shame really, but it looks like the enthusiast market is at a standstill till AMD starts to compete again.
  • 14 Hide
    designasaurus , July 16, 2013 9:46 PM
    There's a rumor going around that Ivy-E is going to have a soldered heatspreader instead of using thermal paste. Obviously this would be a big differentiator for enthusiasts picking between Haswell and Ivy-E. Given your access to Ivy-E, do you guys at Tom's have any opinions on this rumor?
Other Comments
  • 6 Hide
    naihan , July 16, 2013 9:29 PM
    Boring. Call me when X99 platform is available.
  • -2 Hide
    Someone Somewhere , July 16, 2013 9:30 PM
    Probably would have been nice to be 8-core. Isn't the actual die on these things just a cut-down 12-core chip? Think I read that somewhere.

    EDIT: Minor error:
    Quote:
    surface alongside Haswell-based 9-series chipsets


    Shouldn't that be Broadwell?
  • 14 Hide
    designasaurus , July 16, 2013 9:46 PM
    There's a rumor going around that Ivy-E is going to have a soldered heatspreader instead of using thermal paste. Obviously this would be a big differentiator for enthusiasts picking between Haswell and Ivy-E. Given your access to Ivy-E, do you guys at Tom's have any opinions on this rumor?
  • 8 Hide
    killerchickens , July 16, 2013 9:46 PM
    I bet it overclocks like a beast. :) 
    Lol now time to spend $1000 to save on my power bill.
  • 37 Hide
    ingtar33 , July 16, 2013 10:35 PM
    about all i'd expect. shame really, but it looks like the enthusiast market is at a standstill till AMD starts to compete again.
  • -8 Hide
    sna , July 16, 2013 10:46 PM
    too early to judge...

    The 6 cores ivyBridge-e "K" version is the real thing.

    and I dont get it , how Tomshardwae fails to say about the SandyBridge-e not having PCIE 3.0 support , while the ivy-E has PCIe 3.0 support . this is a Big factor here.
  • 7 Hide
    ingtar33 , July 16, 2013 10:56 PM
    Quote:
    too early to judge...

    The 6 cores ivyBridge-e "K" version is the real thing.

    and I dont get it , how Tomshardwae fails to say about the SandyBridge-e not having PCIE 3.0 support , while the ivy-E has PCIe 3.0 support . this is a Big factor here.


    they did say it. You didn't read the beginning of the review. Of course pci-e 3.0 is a gimmick and not a reason to buy a new 2011 mb and ib-e chip... and it will remain a marketing gimmick untill gpus can actually be bottlenecked by pci-e 2.0 x16... high end gpus barely bottleneck on pci-e 2.0 x8 atm... it will be a little while (another generation or 3) before gpus will NEED pci-e 3.0.

  • 2 Hide
    Someone Somewhere , July 16, 2013 11:24 PM
    Quote:
    official PCI Express 3.0 compliance (remember, Sandy Bridge-E only claimed 8 GT/s signaling support), and 22 nm manufacturing.


    That's pretty much saying it did it unofficially.

    Besides, you have to look hard to find something bottlenecked by PCIe2.0x8; even high-end GPUs won't run into bandwidth limitations.
  • 9 Hide
    shin0bi272 , July 16, 2013 11:29 PM
    still no gaming benchmarks eh? I guess I'll save my money and stick with my i7-920 for a little bit longer.
  • 6 Hide
    Someone Somewhere , July 16, 2013 11:41 PM
    First off, yes it is largely a gaming machine. If not, it would likely be using Xeons.

    I'd like to see a situation in which you need 4GB/s each way SAS/SATA, but can't afford a Xeon based platform

    LAN cards. At 500MB/s each way (for an PCIe2.0x1 card, plus you're more likely to use an x4 card). You got something with 10GbE?

    Even a Titan 2x could run on PCIe2.0x16.

    Most people don't like running many addin cards. Besides, where's the room given the expected use of this platform is multi-GPU systems?
  • 2 Hide
    ingtar33 , July 16, 2013 11:42 PM
    Quote:
    :)  PCIe 3.0 is a Gimmick ?

    you people think this is a Gaming only Machine?

    try to buy PCIe 3.0 8x/4x Raid Card for example ... they are around starting at $300

    LAN cards as well , and coming cards etc ..

    and who knows ? maybe Titan 2X cards apper :) 

    And Many people Compalind about their SandyBridge-e not supporting PCIe 3.0 speed..

    as for the lack of USB3.0 and few Sata3 ports , this is a 40 Lanes CPU , just buy that 4X PCIe usb 3.0 card and add it problem solved.


    psh... there ARE pci-e 2.0 x16 boards with multiple card support you know. And pci-e 2.0x16 is identical speed to pci-e 3.0 x8... just as pci-e 3.0 x4 is equal to pci-e 2.0 x8... and as we pointed out, pci-e 2.0 x8 is about the upper limit for gpu to mb interface speed at the moment, and pci-e 2.0 x16 is well beyond any gpu to max out as of now.
  • 3 Hide
    tomfreak , July 17, 2013 12:06 AM
    expensive X version clocked high 3.6GHz 6 core.... why not 150w tdp and 8 core @ 3.1-3.3GHz? Do I need a reason to pay extra when the 4930K is doing almost the same performance?
  • 1 Hide
    slomo4sho , July 17, 2013 12:21 AM
    Wasn't this easy enough to predict by observing the modest improvements trend set forth by Sandy to Ivy and then to Haswell?
  • 3 Hide
    flong777 , July 17, 2013 12:53 AM
    Wow SB is looking better and better. IB was at least a modest upgrade to SB but Haswell is just a loser and that's sad.

    There is one exception; the Haswell processors for laptops are much more efficient and provide huge increases in run time without losing any speed. But for desktops, Haswell appears to be a complete bust.
  • 2 Hide
    daglesj , July 17, 2013 1:05 AM
    A nice chip for someone I'm sure but surely the market for these high end chips is dwindling really?

    I'd be intrigued to see the sales figures for Intels high-end chips today compared to say eight years ago.
  • 2 Hide
    ingtar33 , July 17, 2013 2:05 AM
    Quote:
    Wake me up when they gonna sell 12 core i-somethings for 400 bucks


    considering they're selling 6 cores for 1000, they wouldn't sell a 8 core for less then 1500 (probably 2k)... anyone expecting less is kidding themselves. this will remain true as long as AMD is uncompetitive.
  • 0 Hide
    orca_sweets , July 17, 2013 2:36 AM
    Wow. 30% more efficient means with power consumption means use a less powerful light bulb in one of the lamps you use every day. No real performance increase compared to its predecessor. This is depressing. GPU competition right now is awesome. Makes powerful GPUs inexpensive. Now that Intel has passed AMD too much they dont even have to compete with price or performance upgrades. Intel is garbage for what price they charge for some of their processors. Granted, there are several awesome $180 and less options, but anything higher then that and you are paying for BEATS by Dre price premium. We all know how mediocre those are. Sorry. I am done ranting now.
  • -2 Hide
    daglesj , July 17, 2013 2:45 AM
    Really though, what's the issue?

    You can pay $200 and get 90FPS or pay $800 to get 95-100FPS.

    Intel's high-end chips are dead men walking really. More and more niche as time goes on.

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