Cyonic AU-650x PSU Review

Cyonic is a new company that recently entered the PSU market with offerings based on Seasonic platforms, which offer good performance and reliability. Today we're taking a detailed look at the AU-650x power supply.

Cyonic is the result of a few computer enthusiasts, tech geeks and gamers wishing for better high-end components capable of a more extreme computing experience, according to the company's About Us page. So far, the only computer parts Cyonic sells are power supplies. And thanks to the company's close cooperation with Seasonic, which is one of the best PSU manufacturers, it's off to a stellar start. Cyonic's name is a blend of the words cybernetic and electronic. We can't help but notice the resemblance between Seasonic and Cyonic, since both use the "onic" part. Presumably, this is a great coincidence.

Currently, Cyonic has three PSU lines: the AUx, AU and Arise, and each includes three units. The first two cover the 450W and 650W categories, while the Arise family (currently only available in Japan) ranges between 550W and 750W.

The AUx series is Cyonic's flagship. The three units in the series feature 80 Plus Gold efficiency, fully modular cabling and a Fluid Dynamic Bearing (FDB) fan. On top of that, the AUx models offer compact dimensions, making them compatible with very small cases. The unit we're reviewing today is the highest-capacity 650W model.

In addition to its interesting look, this PSU shares the same platform as EVGA's SuperNOVA 650 GS, which is a new Seasonic design addressing budget-oriented users. It's right below the Seasonic G platform, and focuses more on performance per dollar than absolute performance. Thanks to its high-quality parts, including Japanese capacitors and the FDB fan, Cyonic's AU-650x sports increased reliability backed by a five-year warranty. Although EVGA provides an even longer warranty on its similar offering, five years is still a respectable warranty period.

As you probably figured out, the AU-650x's main competitor is, in fact, EVGA's SuperNOVA 650 GS. And although we expect minimal differences in performance, since both PSUs use the same platform, we're still counting on an interesting comparison in areas like noise output.

Specifications

The AU-650x is 80 Plus Gold-certified. Thanks to the DC-DC converters it uses for generating its minor rails, the AU-650x is also compatible with the S6/S7 sleep states introduced by Intel's Haswell architecture. On top of that, it can deliver its full power continuously at up to 50 °C ambient, and its suite of protection features includes everything except over-temperature protection. The five-year warranty on the unit is more than satisfactory.  

A high-quality FDB fan cools the supply's internals; it's a 120mm unit, since the PSU's compact dimensions won't accommodate anything larger. The AU-650x is only 14cm deep. We're more accustomed to 135mm and 140mm fans, which offer good airflow at lower rotational speeds, helping reduce noise output. Smaller fans do facilitate more direct airflow. However, in order to push the same amount of air as a larger fan, they have to spin faster, inevitably generating more noise. Nevertheless, armed with a tuned fan control circuit, even a smaller fan can operate quietly and effectively.

Power Specifications

Rail3.3V5V12V5VSB-12V
Max. PowerAmps2020542.50.3
Watts10064812.53.6
Total Max. Power (W)650

There is only one +12V rail, and it's capable of delivering this PSU's full power on its own. This is fairly typical of PSUs with DC-DC converters for generating the minor rails, since these converters are fed by +12V.

The minor rails have enough capacity for any modern system covered by a mid-range PSU, while the 5VSB rail has the minimum capacity we'd expect from a new power supply.

Cables And Connectors

Modular Cables
DescriptionCable CountConnector Count (Total)
ATX connector 20+4 pin (610mm)11
4+4 pin EPS12V (650mm)11
6+2 pin PCIe (550mm+100mm)24
SATA (400mm+120mm+120mm+120mm)28
4 pin Molex (400mm+120mm+120mm+120mm)14
FDD Adapter (+110mm)11

Cyonic equips this PSU with a single EPS connector; in our opinion, it should have at least two. On the other hand, there are plenty of auxiliary PCIe connectors for a 650W PSU. The same goes for the eight SATA connectors spread across two cables. You'll find a quartet of four-pin Molex connectors for peripherals, and a Berg adapter for components that still need it.

Overall, cable length is good, although we would like a little more distance between the peripheral connectors (at least 150mm).

Finally, all of the cables employ standard 18-gauge wires offering low voltage drops and enough flexibility to be routed through your chassis.

Power Distribution

Since this PSU features a single +12V rail, we do not have anything to say about its power distribution.

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20 comments
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  • JQB45
    Interesting, but I'll stick with Seasonic's own offerings...
    3
  • PureBlackFire
    this along with the GS 550/650 all need price drops. selling at the same price as the XFX XTR series and other offerings on the superior S12G platform is a bad move. the EVGA G2 units sink this even further being just $10 more.
    0
  • CTurbo
    Geez this market is getting crowded. I'm sure this is a great unit, but what could it possibly offer that Seasonic's other numerous 650w units don't? I understand it from Seasonic's standpoint. The more hands in the cookie jar, the more cookies!
    0
  • turkey3_scratch
    Overall, I personally find the EVGA GS to be a bit overrated, and this unit is not much better. I just can't deal with 3.3V rail load regulation at 4.7%. That's way too high for my liking. Ripple, seeing over 70mv. Again, I don't like that. I just don't think it's that good. The only thing going for this and the GS is the full modularity and the pricing. The Corsair TX V2 is a much better performer than both of these, and that is an old budget oriented unit form years ago. Seasonic needs to step up their game when it comes to these units. I've seen much better, such as the Silverstone Nightjar 520W.

    Then again, I'm a lot more strict when it comes to normal people with this stuff. What is "good" to some of you is probably considered "poor" by me. Or your "Excellent" is my "good". I do recommend the GS series very frequently in many builds. It's an average PSU, and so is this one, but I don't like that 3.3V regulation. If it was lower, I'd be much happier.

    Oh, and great review. Toms has better PSU reviews than any other site.
    1
  • CTurbo
    turkey3_scratch, this unit and the GS series units are in no way "average" in terms of real world usage and reliability. The worst Seasonic psu is still going to be much better than average.
    0
  • turkey3_scratch
    Anonymous said:
    turkey3_scratch, this unit and the GS series units are in no way "average" in terms of real world usage and reliability. The worst Seasonic psu is still going to be much better than average.


    When I see units on the market getting even 0% regulation on minor rails, ripple 10mv on both minor rails and under 25mv for the 12V, I consider the GS to be average. "Average" is subjective - it's just how I think of it. :) Reliability is definitely high, quality capacitors, but it's the performance that I would like to see improvements upon.
    1
  • CTurbo
    Yeah but you're basing EVERYTHING on stats and other peoples' reviews. Have you ever even had your hands on one of these? Have you ever used one? Have you ever done a psu tear down? I'm not trying to bust your balls. I'm glad that you have taken such an interest in psus. I'm just saying there's no substitute for hands on experience.
    0
  • turkey3_scratch
    Anonymous said:
    Yeah but you're basing EVERYTHING on stats and other peoples' reviews. Have you ever even had your hands on one of these? Have you ever used one? Have you ever done a psu tear down? I'm not trying to bust your balls. I'm glad that you have taken such an interest in psus. I'm just saying there's no substitute for hands on experience.


    Using a PSU is not going to make me like it more or less. From my third person perspective, the PSU is either working or it's not. That's why I like statistics, it tells me what's going on deep inside that I cannot tell from the outside. And no, I have not done a PSU tear down. I'm still a beginner in learning about PSUs. But other people do tear downs, and if they do, I don't need to.

    And also, I'm planning on buying a 550 GS myself. So just goes to show you that I even do like the series, even though I consider it average.
    1
  • blazorthon
    The whole point of this series from Seasonic and the companies who use it is that its cheaper than their high-end line. The results are what I'd call average performance with some instances of issues that are barely in-spec for ATX power supplies. I agree with turkey3_scratch on this.

    These units aren't bad and I'd consider them in some lower budget builds, but not in higher budget builds or when anything more than modest overclocking is intended. They certainly aren't tier 1.
    1
  • turkey3_scratch
    Though the G2 is super close in price to the GS. The current 550W G2 is the exact same price as the 550W GS. As a matter of fact, the GS 550W has probably been my most recommended PSU on this forum. It all depends on how it is priced.
    0
  • CTurbo
    The two XFX 550w bronze units and the EVGA B2 750w Bronze are IMO the most recommended psus on here.
    0
  • turkey3_scratch
    Yeah, true I do recommend the XFX Core Edition 550W a lot. B2 750W used to be my go-to, pcpartpicker doesn't list it anymore, but you can manually go to the page for it and add it to the part list. But frankly, most builds on here only need a 550W PSU like the XFX. And if the B2 is $10 more, I'll recommend the XFX. Ones that do need a higher rated PSU, I usually go to a G2.

    550W GS is probably my second most recommended.
    0
  • CTurbo
    What you talkin about Willis?

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    Power Supply: EVGA 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $59.99
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-01-29 23:48 EST-0500
    0
  • turkey3_scratch
    But to be fair, that's with a $20 rebate, and a lot of users don't want rebates included in their budget. Some users have a strict amount of money and don't want to spend the extra $20 for the time being.
    0
  • CTurbo
    It was more of a response to you saying that partpicker doesn't list it anymore.
    0
  • JQB45
    So how would we rate this power supply? To me with the ripple issue I'd say its a solid Tier-3 unit, possible Tier-2.
    0
  • CTurbo
    I wouldn't put it lower than tier 2 based on reliability alone. Reliability being the single most important aspect of a psu IMO.

    When I think of tier 3 units, I think of models that are either mediocre in reliability or models that test well when new, but don't age very well.
    1
  • turkey3_scratch
    Anonymous said:
    So how would we rate this power supply? To me with the ripple issue I'd say its a solid Tier-3 unit, possible Tier-2.


    The ripple wasn't really bad. 60mv is quite common on PSUs. The minor rails were both very good. Thew voltage regulation on the 3.3V rail just could have been improved. It was 0.3% from being out of spec.

    @Cturbo: I mean if you go to pcpartpicker, and click on PSU, and narrow it down to EVGA units, the B2 is not listed. But if you Google "pcpartpicker EVGA B2", you can find the page for it.
    0
  • CTurbo
    Quote:
    @Cturbo: I mean if you go to pcpartpicker, and click on PSU, and narrow it down to EVGA units, the B2 is not listed. But if you Google "pcpartpicker EVGA B2", you can find the page for it.



    It's there for me when I do it. It's the only 750w semi-mod Bronze for $59 on the list.
    0
  • turkey3_scratch
    Oh, I found it now. I was ctrl-f and searching for "B2" but I realized it's not listed as B2.
    0