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A Budget CPU At Top Speeds, Continued

A 4.1 GHz Dual Core at $130 - Can it be True?
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As one of our more enthusiastic readers wrote to us a few years ago, when we were chasing new overclocking records on what seemed like a daily basis: "I'll knock your numbers down to the ground." In this case, he was referring to the video encoding performance numbers that a heavily overclocked system could post when compared to a stock PC. We've also seen another similar phenomena in days of yore, which ambitious (but older) users probably remember. For example, the Intel Celeron 300A, for which a 300 MHz clock rate was specified, worked flawlessly at 450 MHz. Foreshadowing our current champ, this low-cost offering also knocked a much more expensive Pentium II 400 into the back seat.

Can be had on the cheap: Intel Pentium D 805 at a price of $130.

The Pentium D 805 gives Intel an unassuming budget CPU for its processor portfolio, but simply overclocking the device to 4.1 GHz puts it ahead of top-of-the-line high-dollar processors. For overclocking aficionados this means one thing: the AMD Opteron 144, which led the overclocking pack until just recently, has been dethroned by the Pentium D 805. This latter processor is not only easier on the pocketbook, it's also a noticeably better performer, thanks to its dual core architecture - the Opteron offers only a single core.

The just-opened packaging for the Intel Pentium D 805, which we purchased.

How the Pentium D CPU appears inside the Windows Device Manager
Summary
  1. A Budget CPU At Top Speeds
  2. A Budget CPU At Top Speeds, Continued
  3. Inside the Pentium D 805
  4. The Secret Of The Multiplier
  5. 133 MHz FSB: Perfect For Overclocking
  6. How Is Breaking The 4 GHz Barrier Possible?
  7. How Is Breaking The 4 GHz Barrier Possible? Continued
  8. How Is Breaking The 4 GHz Barrier Possible? Continued
  9. Three Theories Where The Customer Comes Out Ahead
  10. Which Memory Clock Speed Is Most Suitable?
  11. The Right Chipset
  12. Keeping Cool When Power Consumed Tops 150 Watts at 4.1 GHz
  13. Keeping Cool When Power Consumed Tops 150 Watts at 4.1 GHz, Continued
  14. Power Consumption Levels Top 200 W
  15. Power Consumption Levels Top 200 W, Continued
  16. Energy Saving Functions Lack C1E
  17. Risk-free Overclocking, Including Heat Protection
  18. Ready For The 64 Bit Future
  19. Tom's Hardware Guides Overclocking Diary
  20. 3.33 GHz Remains Stable At Standard Voltage Levels
  21. 3.33 GHz Remains Stable At Standard Voltage Levels, Continued
  22. Trouble Free Operation At 3.60 GHz
  23. At 3.8 GHz Some Minor Voltage Increases Become Necessary
  24. Water Cooling Is Recommended For 4.0 GHz
  25. Water Cooling Is Recommended For 4.0 GHz, Continued
  26. Overclocking To 4.10 GHz Boosts Basic Clock Speed By 54 Percent
  27. Overclocking To 4.10 GHz Boosts Basic Clock Speed By 54 Percent, Continued
  28. Will The System Boot At 4.3 GHz?
  29. Benchmark Results Show Performance Increases Of Up To 54 Percent
  30. 3D, Continued
  31. 3D, Continued
  32. Video Editing / Video Encoding
  33. Video, Continued
  34. Video, Continued
  35. Audio Encoding
  36. Office Applications
  37. Office Applications, Continued
  38. Parallel Applications - Multitasking
  39. Synthetic Benchmarks
  40. Synthetic Benchmarks, Continued
  41. Synthetic Benchmarks, Continued
  42. Synthetic Benchmarks, Continued
  43. Summary Overview: Who's The Winner?
  44. Conclusion: The 4.1 GHz Dual Core Delivers Peak Performance For Pocket Change
  45. Conclusion, Continued
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